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The Edinburgh Review; or, Critical Journal [1st]  Introduction
Volume 1  (October 1802 to January 1803)
Issue 1 (October 1802)Expand    Contract

Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 1–18.

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Art. I. [Review of De l'influence attribuée aux philosophes, by Jean J Mounier]

[Francis Jeffrey] Jeffrey, Francis, Lord Jeffrey (1773–1850) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Mounier 1801 Mounier, Jean Joseph 1801. De l'influence attribuée aux philosophes aux Franc-Macons et aux illuminés sur la révolution de France, Tubingen: J.G. Cotta; London: Dulau et Co.
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Subjects:

Politics, Causation, Botany, Scientific Practitioners

People mentioned:

John Robison Robison, John (1739–1805) DSB
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    Considers that Jean J Mounier Mounier, Jean Joseph (1758–1806) WBI
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has given a 'history' of the French Revolution rather than an 'account of its causes' (6). 'He has stated, as the first causes of the revolution, circumstances that really proved it to be begun; and has gone no further back than to the earliest of its apparent effects: He has [...] contented himself with referring the fruit to the blossom, without taking any account of the germination of the seed, or the subterraneous windings of the root' (7).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 18–24.

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Art. II. [Review of Spital Sermon, by Samuel Parr]

[Sydney Smith] Smith, Sydney (1771–1845) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Parr 1801 Parr, Samuel 1801. A Spital Sermon, Preached at Christ Church, upon Easter Tuesday, April 15, 1800; To Which are Added Notes, London: J. Mawman; Cambridge: W. H. Lunn, J. Deighton, and B. Flower; Oxford: J. Cooke, Hanwell and Parker, and R. Bliss
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Subjects:

Politics, Utilitarianism, Morality, Religion, Hospitals, Patronage, Universities, Lecturing


    Reviews Samuel Parr's Parr, Samuel (1747–1825) ODNB
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arguments against both William Godwin's Godwin, William, the elder (1756–1836) ODNB
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views on universal benevolence and Anne R J Turgot's Turgot, Anne-Robert-Jacques (1727–81) DSB
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objections to charitable institutions. Merely alludes to the particular charitable institutions in favour of which Parr's sermon was, in part, preached (namely the five 'royal hospitals' under the superintendence of the Lord Mayor of London: St Thomas's St Thomas's Hospital
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, St Bartholomew's St Bartholomew's Hospital
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, Bridewell Bridewell, prison
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, Bethlehem Hospital Bethlehem Royal Hospital
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, and especially Christ's Hospital Christ's Hospital
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). Remarks on Parr's '32 pages of very close printing, in defence of the University of Oxford University of Oxford
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', rhetorically enquiring whether it is true 'that very many of its Professors enjoy ample salaries, without reading any lectures at all?' (23). Notes that since the publication of Parr's book the university authorities have 'abolished their very ludicrous and disgraceful exercises for degrees, and have substituted in their place a system of exertion, and a scale of academical honours, calculated [...] to produce the happiest effects' (24).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 24–26.

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Art. III. [Review of Thoughts Occasioned by the Perusal of Dr. Parr's Spital Sermon, by William Godwin]

[Sydney Smith] Smith, Sydney (1771–1845) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Godwin 1801 Godwin, William 1801. Thoughts Occasioned by the Perusal of Dr. Parr's Spital Sermon, Preached at Christ Church, April 15, 1800: Being a Reply to the Attacks of Dr. Parr, Mr. Mackintosh, the Author of an Essay on Population, and Others, London: G. G. and J. Robinson
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Subjects:

Utilitarianism, Mental Illness, Population, Radicalism, Medical Treatment


    Approves William Godwin's Godwin, William, the elder (1756–1836) ODNB
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recantation of the principle 'that general utility should be made the immediate motive to our actions', and his comments on particular and general affections (25). Observes that, having read so far, he had hoped 'that a radical cure had been effected' for Godwin's complaint, but that on reading his remarks on population the 'delusion was dispelled', and he concluded that Godwin's was a 'case for life'. Godwin's expedients for counteracting 'the bad effects of excessive population, (so ably pointed out by Mr. Malthus Malthus, Thomas Robert (1766–1834) DSB
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,) are, abortion and child-murder'. In consequence, suggests to Godwin 'the infinite importance of shaving and blistering the crown of his head, of keeping the primæ viæ open, and of strictly pursuing an antiphlogistic regimen. By these means, we have some times seen the understandings of great philosophers wonderfully and rapidly improved'. (26)



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802), 26–43.

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Art. IV. [Review of Asiatic Researches, Volume 6]

Alexander Hamilton Hamilton, Alexander (1762–1824) ODNB
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Hunter 1801, Hunter, William 1801. 'Narrative of a Journey from Agra to Oujein', Asiatick Researches, 6, 7–77
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Lambton 1801, Lambton, William 1801. 'Observations on the Theory of Walls, Wherein some Particulars are Investigated which have not been Considered by Writers on Fortifications', Asiatick Researches, 6, 93–102
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Boag 1801, Boag, William 1801. 'On the Poison of Serpents', Asiatick Researches, 6, 103–27
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Cox 1801, Cox, Hiram 1801. 'An Account of the Petroleum Wells in the Burman Dominians, Extracted from the Journal of a Voyage from Rangong, up the River Iravati to Amarapura', Asiatick Researches, 6, 127–37
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Buchanan 1801, Buchanan, Francis Hamilton 1801. 'On the Religion and Literature of the Burmas', Asiatick Researches, 6, 163–308
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Hardwicke 1801, Hardwicke, Thomas 1801. 'Narrative of a Journey to Srinagar', Asiatick Researches, 6, 309–81
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Bentley 1801, Bentley, John 1801. 'On the Antiquity of the Surya Siddhanta and the Formation of the Astronomical Cycles Therein Contained', Asiatick Researches, 6, 540–43
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, Asiatic Researches Asiatic[k] Researches; or, Transactions of the Society Instituted in Bengal for Inquiring into the History and Antiquities, the Arts, Sciences and Literature of India (1788–1839) Waterloo Directory
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[1 Introduction]

Subjects:

Exploration, Botany, Astronomy


    Observes that 'Amidst the acquisitions which a few years have added to the stock of general information', scholars including botanists 'will acknowledge important obligations to the ardour of literary research, excited in the centre of Asia'. Considers that the learned will particularly look to the 'publications of the Society instituted at Calcutta Asiatic Society [of Bengal], Calcutta
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by the late Sir William Jones Jones, Sir William (1746–94) ODNB
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'. (26) Examines some of the recent findings, and notes that 'that antiquity of the astronomical observations of the Hindus has become a subject of interesting discussion' (27).



[2 Review of Narrative of a Journey from Agra to Oujein, by William Hunter]

Subjects:

Exploration, Amusement, Experiment, Reading, Illustration, Encyclopaedias, Astronomy, Vulcanology


    Notes that at Bruwasagar [Burwa Sagar] the Mahratta subadar 'amused himself with philosophical experiments; he had got the plates of the Encyclopædia, neatly copied by artists of his own; and at the age of sixty, expressed great solicitude to obtain an instructor in the English language, to enable him to understand the text'. Notes that Oujein (i.e. Ujjain) defines the first meridian for Hindu astronomers. Relates William Hunter's Hunter, William (1755–1812) ODNB
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speculations about the cause of the burial of the ancient city of Oujein, which he considers must have been due to an earthquake 'operating with a gentler concussion than usually attends that tremendous phenomenon'. (28)



[4 Review of Observations on the Theory of Walls, by William Lambton]

Subjects:

Mathematics, Mechanics, Engineering, Military Technology


[5 Review of On the Poison of Serpents, by William Boag]

Subjects:

Zoology, Pharmaceuticals, Chemistry

People mentioned:

Felice Fontana Fontana, Felice (1730–1805) DSB
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[6 Review of An Account of the Petroleum Wells in the Burman Dominians, by Hiram Cox]

Subjects:

Exploration, Geology

People mentioned:

Michael Symes, Symes, Michael (1761–1809) ODNB
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Archibald Cochrane (9th Earl of Dundonald) Cochrane, Archibald, 9th Earl of Dundonald (1749–1831) DSB
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[7 Review of On the Religion and Literature of the Burmans, by Francis H Buchanan]

Subjects:

Ethnography, Physical Geography, Botany, Cultural Geography, Astronomy

People mentioned:

Georges L Leclerc, comte de Buffon Buffon, Georges-Louis Leclerc, comte de (1707–88) DSB
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    Observes that the author might have been spared the trouble of ridiculing 'the science of the Brahmins' had he read William Jones's Jones, Sir William (1746–94) ODNB
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observation that the 'system of the Jyauthishicas, or mathematical astronomers' should not be confused with 'that of the Pauranicas, or poetical fabulists; for, to such a confusion alone must we impute the many mistakes of Europeans on the subject of Indian science' (37).



[8 Review of Narrative of a Journey to Srinagar, by Thomas Hardwicke]

Subjects:

Exploration, Botany


[12 Review of On the Antiquity of the Surya Siddhanta, by John Bentley]

Subjects:

Mathematics, Ethnography, Astronomy

People mentioned:

Varahamihira Varahamihira (6th century) DSB
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    Observes that 'Mr. Bentley Bentley, John (fl. 1799–1823) WBI
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appears to be a mathematician of considerable industry and merit' and that 'he has supplied some instructive observations on the principles of the Hindu astronomy, and on the manner in which their cycles were, or might have been formed' (42). Critically examines Bentley's argument from astronomical texts that the entire Sanscrit corpus is of a recent age.




Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 44–59.

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Art. V. [Review of Travels in the Ottoman Empire, by Guillaume A Olivier]

[Alexander Hamilton] Hamilton, Alexander (1762–1824) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Olivier 1801 Olivier, Guillaume Antoine 1801. Travels in the Ottoman Empire, Egypt, and Persia: Undertaken by Order of the Government of France, During the First Six Years of the Republic, London: T. N. Longman & O. Rees, and T. Cadell Jun. and W. Davies
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Subjects:

Exploration, Government, Natural History, Entomology, Amusement, Hydrography, Population, Epidemiology, Climatology, Medical Treatment, Vulcanology, Geology


    Observes that Guillaume A Olivier's Olivier, Guillaume Antoine (1756–1814) WBI
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journey was commissioned amidst 'the horrors of the revolutionary crisis in France', purportedly to collect information primarily on 'Commerce, agriculture, natural history, general physics, geography, the medical art, and even our political relations with Turkey' (44). Concludes from Olivier's established reputation as an entomological author that this purported intent was not a mere pretence to cover 'purposes of more questionable tendancy' (44). In his narrative Olivier explicitly eschews amusing anecdotes and descriptions. Discusses Olivier's account of recent hydrographical work carried out at the request of the Institut Nationale Institut Nationale, Paris
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. Discusses Olivier's account of the consequences of polygamy on population size. Observes that 'canine madness is totally unknown in the east', and discusses the analogy developed by Olivier between 'that disorder and the plague, neither of which, he thinks, can be spontaneously generated or communicated by the atmosphere' (51). Discusses Olivier's suggested treatment for the plague. Observes of the island of Delos that, while 'every where schistose or granitical, it exhibits no trace of volcano; "nothing that can explain, by the laws of physics, the wonders which the Greeks have transmitted to us respecting it"' (57–58). Repeats Olivier's descriptions of the geology of some of the other Greek islands.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 59–61.

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Art. VI. [Review of Political Recollections in Egypt, by George Baldwin]

[Alexander Hamilton] Hamilton, Alexander (1762–1824) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Baldwin 1801 Baldwin, George 1801. Political Recollections Relative to Egypt: Containing Observations on its Government Under the the Mamaluks; its Geographical Position; its Intrinsic and Extrinsic Resources; its Relative Importance to England and France; and its Dangers to England in the Possession of France; With a Narrative of the Ever-Memorable British Campaign in the Spring of 1801, London: T. Cadell, jun. and W. Davies
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Subjects:

Disease, Medical Treatment, Induction, Error, Chemistry, Experiment


    The reviewer is fiercely critical of the work, stating that George Baldwin Baldwin, George (1744–1826) ODNB
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'has suppressed every particle of information on the subjects he professes to discuss'. As an example of this, he discusses Baldwin's 'essay on the plague' which 'occupies a considerable portion of this publication'. Baldwin has been led by a 'singular process of induction' to place his confidence in the topical application of olive oil for the prevention and cure of the plague. (60) The treatment is based on a chemical theory of disease; Baldwin supposes that the humours of the diseased body are caused to effervesce by the presence of an acid, which can be abstracted from the body by its affinity for oil. He suggests the same treatment for gout. He has sought to demonstrate its efficacy by an experiment in which the acid juice of a lemon is removed by its affinity for olive oil.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 61–63.

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Art. VII. [Review of An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of Emigration, by Alexander Irvine]

[Francis Horner] Horner, Francis (1778–1817) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Irvine 1802 Irvine, Alexander 1802. An Inquiry into the Causes and Effects of Emigration from the Highlands and Western Islands of Scotland: With Observations on the Means to be Employed for Preventing it, Edinburgh: Peter Hill; London: Longman & Rees
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Subjects:

Political Economy, Population


    The reviewer observes that since Alexander Irvine Irvine, Alexander (fl. 1802) RLIN
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is a clergyman well-placed to gather local information, he had expected 'instruction on a very interesting topic in the political economy of Scotland'. Instead, the author 'has preferred fine writing to inquiry; and his reader, who looks for facts, will in vain peruse a tedious volume of eloquence' (61–62).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 63–83.

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Art. VIII. [Review of Thalaba the Destroyer, by Robert Southey]

[Francis Jeffrey] Jeffrey, Francis, Lord Jeffrey (1773–1850) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Southey 1801 Southey, Robert 1801. Thalaba the Destroyer, 2 vols, London: T. N. Longman and O. Rees
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Subjects:

Horticulture, Acclimatization, Climatology


    Observes that English blank odes, sapphics, and dactylics have been considered 'as a species of monsters, or exotics, that were not very likely to propagate, or thrive, in so unpropitious a climate', but that Robert Southey Southey, Robert (1774–1843) ODNB
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'has made a vigorous effort for their naturalization, and generously endangered his own reputation in [sic] their behalf' (72).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 83–90.

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Art. IX. [Review of Discourses on Several Subjects, by Thomas Rennell]

[Sydney Smith] Smith, Sydney (1771–1845) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Rennell 1802 Rennell, Thomas 1802. Discourses on Various Subjects, London: F. and C. Rivington
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Subjects:

Infidelity, Reasoning, Utilitarianism, Population, Natural Theology


    Observes that Thomas Rennell Rennell, Thomas (1754–1840) ODNB
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'is apt to put on the appearance of a holy bully, an evangelical swaggerer, as if he could carry his point against infidelity by big words and strong abuse, and kick and cuff men into Christians'. Instead of expressing contempt of infidel philosophers, who 'have power to allure from the Church great numbers of proselytes', one should study them diligently and answer them satisfactorily. While everybody was 'abusing and despising Mr. Godwin Godwin, William, the elder (1756–1836) ODNB
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' he continued to grow in popularity, but 'Mr. Malthus Malthus, Thomas Robert (1766–1834) DSB
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took the trouble of refuting him; and we hear no more of Mr. Godwin'. (88) Criticizes Rennell's 'admiration of the ancients', which leads him to consider 'the works of Homer Homer (8th century BC) CBD
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to be the region and depositary [sic] of natural law and natural religion' (89). Observes that this is ludicrous in view of Homer's often immoral polytheism.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 91–92.

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Art. X. [Review of Voyage dans les departemens de la France, by Joseph, marquis de Lavallée]

[Alexander Hamilton] Hamilton, Alexander (1762–1824) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Lavallee et al. 1792–1802 Lavallée, Joseph et al. 1792–1802. Voyage dans les départemens de la France, par une société d'artistes et de gens de lettres; enrichi de tableaux géographiques et d'estampes, 13 vols, Paris: Brion [and 3 others]
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Subjects:

Statistics, Politics


    'A STATISTICAL Survey of France, in its modern divisions, would be a work eminently calculated to attract, and to repay, the attention of the politician, and of the public at large. The publication before us, though it comprehend a part of the subjects now generally denominated Statistics, yet embraces so many other topics, as to furnish but a very superficial view of those which we consider as the most important' (91).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 94–98.

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Art. XII. [Review of Reflections at the Conclusion of the War, by John Bowles]

[Sydney Smith] Smith, Sydney (1771–1845) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Bowles 1801 Bowles, John 1801. Reflections at the Conclusion of the War: Being a Sequel to "Reflections on the Political and Moral State of Society, at the Close of the Eighteenth Century", 3rd edn, London: F. and C. Rivington
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Subjects:

Politics, Disease, Medical Treatment, Quackery, Radicalism


    'There is a political, as well as a bodily hypochondriasis; and there are empirics always on the watch to make their prey, either of the one, or of the other. Dr. Solomon Solomon, Samuel (d. 1818?) WBI
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, Dr. Brodum Brodum, William (fl.1767) ODNB
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, and Mr. Bowles Bowles, John (1751–1819) ODNB
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, have all commanded their share of the public attention; but the two former gentlemen continue to flourish with undiminished splendour; while the patients of the latter are fast dwindling away, and his drugs falling into disuse and contempt' (94–5). Ridiculing Bowles's fears of sedition, the author observes: 'All complaint is futile, which is not followed up by appropriate remedies. If Parliament Houses of Parliament
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, or Catarrh, do not save us, Dignum Dignum, Charles (1765?–1827) DSB
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and Sedgwick Sedgwick, Mr (d. 1803) WBI
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will quaver away the King George III, King of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover (1738–1820) ODNB
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, shake down the House of Lords House of Lords
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, and warble us into all the horrors of republican government' (97).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802), 98–106.

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Art. XIII. [Review of Addresse aux vrais hommes de bien, by Jean Herrenschwand]

Francis Jeffrey Jeffrey, Francis, Lord Jeffrey (1773–1850) ODNB
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Herrenschwand 1801 Herrenschwand, Jean 1801. Addresse aux vrais hommes de bien: a ceux qui gouvernent comme à ceux qui sont governés, London: W. and C. Spilsbury
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Subjects:

Theology of Nature, Invention, Progress, Human Species, Political Economy


    Reports that Jean Herrenschwand's Herrenschwand, Jean (1728–1812) RLIN
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objective in this book is to demonstrate that 'in the general design of the universe [...] the race of man was destined to develope the earth in all its different capabilities, and, at the same time, to develope in itself all the faculties with the germs of which it had been provided by nature', and that, rather than 'promoting this double development', monarchs have always, 'either through error or depravity', been the 'scourges of mankind' (98). Considers that Herrenschwand states some truths, but that these are already better expounded elsewhere. These include his 'speculation which traces man's inventions to his necessities, and shews the dependence of his improvement on his wants; and all the reasoning that relates to the variations of price, and the natural causes by which production and consumption are adapted to each other'. His original remarks are 'extravagant and absurd', such as 'that great discovery, for the sake of which the whole book seems to have been written, which reveals the inseparable connexion between the prosperity of a people and the profuse expenditure of their rulers' (99).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 106–08.

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Art. XIV. [Review of The Utility of Country Banks Considered]

[Francis Horner] Horner, Francis (1778–1817) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Anon 1802 Anon. 1802. The Utility of Country Banks Considered, London: J. Hatchard
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Subjects:

Political Economy, Population, Industry, Commerce


    Views the work as largely a poor plagiarism of Smith 1776 Smith, Adam 1776. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, 2 vols, London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell
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and Hume 1752 Hume, David 1752. Political Discourses, Edinburgh: A. Kincaid and A. Donaldson
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.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 108–12.

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Art. XV. [Review of Bread; or, The Poor, by Samuel J Pratt]

[John A Murray] Murray, Sir John Archibald, Lord Murray (1778?–1859) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Pratt 1801 Pratt, Samuel Jackson 1801. Bread; or, The Poor: A Poem with Notes and Illustrations, London: Longman and Rees, and T Becket
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Subjects:

Political Economy


    Samuel J Pratt Pratt, Samuel Jackson (1749–1814) ODNB
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professes 'to instruct, as well as amuse the public; to interest their humanity, by an account of the sufferings of the poor, and enlighten their understandings by this profound lesson of political economy, That scarcity is occasioned entirely by monopoly, and lately took place after plentiful harvests' (108–09). The reviewer considers Pratt's doctrine absurd and his poetry equally bad.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 113.

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Art. XVI [Review of Anniversary Sermon of the Royal Humane Society by William Langford]

[Sydney Smith] Smith, Sydney (1771–1845) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Langford 1801 Langford, William 1801. The Anniversary Sermon of the Royal Humane Society, Kensington, April 19, 1801: An Appendix by the Society, on Shipwrecked Mariners, etc., London: printed by Nichols and Son
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Subjects:

Societies, Medical Treatment, Accidents

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Humane Society Royal Humane Society
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    'An incident which happened to the gentleman engaged in reviewing this Sermon, proves, in the most striking manner, the importance of this charity for restoring to life persons in whom the vital power is suspended. He was discovered, with Dr. Langford's Langford, William (fl. 1801) RLIN
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discourse lying open before him, in the state of the most profound sleep'. After further facetious comments on the sermon's style the reviewer concludes: 'The charity itself is above all praise'.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 122–27.

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Art. XIX. [Review of L'art de rendre les revolutions utiles, by J Esprit Bonnet]

[Thomas Brown] Brown, Thomas (1778–1820) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Bonnet 1801 [Bonnet, J. Esprit] 1801. Essai sur l'Art de Rendre les Revolutions Utiles, 2 vols, Paris: Maradan
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Subjects:

Politics, Medical Treatment


    J Esprit Bonnet Bonnet, J-Esprit (fl. 1795–1816) RLIN
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applies his 'revolutionary science' to ancient Rome and other situations. The reviewer observes: 'The idiosyncracy [sic] of such a constitution [as that of Rome] certainly affords no room for analogical inference [...] and to reason from its destiny, as to the utility of revolutions and counter-revolutions, in general, is like judging of the qualities of a drug, by its operation on a paralytic or an idiot' (123). Uses further medical imagery. Bonnet's 'recipe for preventing revolution seems to indicate a bolder practice [...] than his system of cure'. Paraphrases Bonnet as claiming that 'The philosophy of modern times has infected the throne itself', insofar as kings 'tacitly recognize the sovereignty of the people'. (124)



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 128–30.

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Art. XX. [Review of A Thanksgiving for Plenty, by Robert Nares]

[Sydney Smith] Smith, Sydney (1771–1845) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Nares 1801 Nares, Robert 1801. A Thanksgiving for Plenty; and a Warning Against Avarice: A Sermon, London: printed for the author
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Subjects:

Providence, Piety, Agriculture, Miracle, Meteorology, Natural Law, Political Economy


    The reviewer points to inconsistencies in this sermon. Robert Nares Nares, Robert (1753–1829) ODNB
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writes of visitations of providence 'for the purposes of trial, warning, and correction'. He contends that 'it would be presumptuous and impious to pronounce the purposes' for which God interferes, but adds that 'it has pleased God, within these few years, to give us a most awful lesson of the vanity of agriculture and importation without piety'. (128) Nares writes that God does not interpose by 'positive miracle' but 'influences by means unknown to all but himself, and directs the winds, the rain, and glorious beams of heaven to execute his judgements, or fulfil his merciful designs' (128–29). The reviewer observes: 'Now, either the wind, the rain, and the beams, are here represented to act as they do in the ordinary course of nature, or they are not: If they are, how can their operations be considered as a judgment [sic] on sins? and if they are not, what are their extraordinary operations but positive miracles' (129). Rejects Nares's charge of monopoly against the farmers.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 130–41.

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Art. XXI. [Review of The Journal of Friedrich Horneman's Travels]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Young, ed. 1802 Young, William, ed. 1802. The Journal of Frederick Horneman's Travels from Cairo to Mourzouk, the Capital of the Kingdom of Fezzan, in Africa, in the Years 1797–8, London: G. and W. Nicol
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Subjects:

Exploration, Patronage, Societies, Government, Cultural Geography, Politics, Physical Geography, Climatology, Expertise, Mapping, Imperialism, Commerce

People mentioned:

Mungo Park, Park, Mungo (1771–1806) ODNB
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James Rennell, Rennell, James (1742–1830) ODNB
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John Ledyard, Ledyard, John (1751–89) ODNB
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Joseph Banks Banks, Sir Joseph (1743–1820) DSB ODNB
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Publications cited:

Browne 1799 Browne, William George 1799. Travels in Africa, Egypt, and Syria, from the Year 1792 to 1798, London: T. Cadell junior and W. Davies, and T. N. Longman and O. Rees
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    Describes the circumstances of Friedrich K Horneman's Hornemann, Friedrich Konrad (1772–1800) WBI
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travels, which were conducted under the patronage of the Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior Parts of Africa Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior Parts of Africa
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. Observes that he travelled to Egypt via France, 'where he met with every assistance from that liberal and enlightened spirit which has always directed the scientific circles of Paris'. Notes that Napoleon Napoleon I, Emperor of France (1769–1821) CBD
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gave him assistance in Egypt, which he was at that time 'pillaging [...] under the treble disguise of mussulman, a man of science, and a friend of liberty' (130). Ridicules the 'laboured and pompous panegyric' on the African association in the introduction by William Young Young, Sir William, 2nd Baronet (1749–1815) ODNB
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, who emphasizes the disciplined expertise of the society's travellers (134).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 141–58.

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Art. XXII. [Review of Voyages from Montreal, by Alexander Mackenzie]

[Francis Jeffrey] Jeffrey, Francis, Lord Jeffrey (1773–1850) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Mackenzie 1801 Mackenzie, Alexander 1801. Voyages from Montreal, on the River St. Laurence, Through the Continent of North America, to the Frozen and Pacific Oceans, in the Years 1789 and 1793: With a Preliminary Account of the Rise, Progress, and Present State of the Fur Trade of that Country, London: T. Cadell, jun. and W. Davies
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Subjects:

Exploration, Natural History, Physical Geography, Ethnography, Race, Progress, Meteorology, Botany, Expertise, Instruments, Metrology, Heroism

People mentioned:

George Vancouver Vancouver, George (1757–98) ODNB
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    Observes that, while this is an interesting volume, it 'will convey but little important information to the Geographer, the naturalist, or the statesman' (141). Summarizes Alexander Mackenzie's Mackenzie, Sir Alexander (1763/4–1820) ODNB
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description of the Inuit peoples and his theory of their racial origins; discusses the failure of the Inuit to show any 'progress in civilization or improvement' under European influence (146). Observes that Mackenzie 'is not a naturalist, and had no leisure for minute observations'. Describes his observations of vegetation growing on permanently frozen ground, and of mixed woodland being succeeded exclusively by poplars after destruction by fire. Observes of the latter: 'Mr. Mackenzie must excuse us for not giving implicit faith to this observation'. Describes how, after one unsuccessful attempt to reach the Pacific coast, Mackenzie made a winter voyage to Britain 'for the express purpose of obtaining the necessary instruments and information, and returned fully qualified to make a scientific survey of the countries he was to traverse, and to fix his geographical positions with accuracy and precision'. (149)



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 158–63.

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Art. XXIII. [Review of The Elements of Optics, by James Wood]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Wood 1801 Wood, James 1801. The Elements of Optics: Designed for the Use of Students in the University, 2nd edn, Cambridge: J. Deighton and J. Nicholson
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Subjects:

Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, Education, Publishing, Textbooks, Universities, Light, Deduction, Induction, Experiment, Instruments, Hypothesis, Gravity, Speculation

Publications cited:

Newton 1729, Newton, Isaac 1729. Lectiones opticae. Annis MDCLXIX, MDCLXX et MDCLXXI in scholis publicis habitae: Et nunc primum ex MSS. in lucem editae, London: Guil. Innys
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Newton 1704 Newton, Isaac 1704. Opticks; or, A Treatise of the Reflexions, Refractions, Inflextions and Colours of Lights. Also Two Treatises of the Species and Magnitude of Curvilinear Figures, London: Sam. Smith and Benj. Walford
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    Relates that, about five years before, James Wood Wood, James (1760–1839) ODNB
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and Samuel Vince Vince, Samuel (1749–1821) ODNB
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'undertook to draw up a series of elementary works, which should comprise the substance of the lectures usually read at Cambridge University of Cambridge
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, upon Mathematics and Natural Philosophy', of which series this is the sixth and last volume (158). Addressing 'philosophical readers', the reviewer notes that the work is concerned with the deductive part of optics to the exclusion of the experimental, probably because the treatise has been composed primarily to 'assist the student of astronomy' (158–59). Does not entirely approve of this plan, which is a slight to Isaac Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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. However, generally approves of the execution of the work, while noticing that some sections contain 'considerable inaccuracies; chiefly where a reference was necessary to the merely experimental branch of the subject' (159). Briefly describes the contents of the work. Concludes with remarks on 'the inaccuracy with which our author has [...] alluded to some passages of Sir Isaac Newton's Optics [sic], in which the theory of Vibrations is mentioned'. Considers this section of Newton's work has commonly been perverted 'by ignorant theorists' who have used his authority to build 'the most extravagant hypotheses'. (162) Argues that Wood has failed to appreciate Newton's caution in stating the hypothesis of an etherial medium and in distinguishing it from a strict induction.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 163–72.

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Art. XXIV. [Review of Travels Through Sweden, Finland, and Lapland by Joseph Acerbi]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Acerbi 1802 Acerbi, Joseph 1802. Travels through Sweden, Finland and Lapland to the North Cape, in the Years 1798 and 1799, 2 vols, London: Joseph Mawman
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Subjects:

Exploration, Climatology, Statistics, Scientific Practitioners, Religion, Magic, Mesmerism, Supernaturalism, Patronage, Government, Natural History, Illustration

People mentioned:

King Gustav III Gustav III, King of Sweden (1746–92) CBD
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    Observes that, while the Joseph Acerbi Acerbi, Joseph von (1773–1846) WBI
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did not intend to give a statistical account of Sweden, 'we cannot imagine a more dry statistical account tha[n] that of Gothenburg' (164). Criticizes his personal remarks regarding academicians at Stockholm, Upsala, and elsewhere. Considers that some of the claims made by Acerbi have been invented; for example 'a man of talents [....] has published a demonstration of the existence of the devil in the human body [...] that the ceremony of exorcism was performed at the baptism of the present Prince Royal—that a gentleman of great abilities, accomplishments, and virtue [...] firmly believes, that by the influence of mesmerism, he can transport himself into heaven, hold converse with his deceased relatives, and distinctly perceive their souls clothed in white jackets'. Also criticizes a 'silly anecdote' which relates to the president of the Royal Society Royal Society of London
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(Joseph Banks Banks, Sir Joseph (1743–1820) DSB ODNB
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), and is 'an exaggerated edition of a falsehood contained in the dull writings of a contemptible satirist' (166). Criticizes as inconsistent and erroneous Acerbi's 'invectives against the government and academies of Sweden' (167). Later criticizes Acerbi's ingratitude in telling anecdotes at the expense of those who have aided him, as in the case of his remarks on Carl P Thunberg Thunberg, Carl Peter (1743–1828) DSB
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and other academicians to whom 'he afterwards informs us [...] his work is indebted for most of the natural history which it contains' (170). Observes that the 'figures of the insects [...] are excellent' (172).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 172–201.

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Art. XXV. [Review of An Inquiry into the Nature and Effects of the Paper Credit of Great Britain, by Henry Thornton]

[Francis Horner] Horner, Francis (1778–1817) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Thornton 1802 Thornton, Henry 1802. An Enquiry into the Nature and Effects of the Paper Credit of Great Britain, London: J. Hatchard, and F. and C. Rivington
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Subjects:

Political Economy, Induction, Cultural Geography, Publishing

People mentioned:

David Hume, Hume, David (1711–76) DSB
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Adam Smith, Smith, Adam (1723–90) ODNB
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Charles L de Secondat Secondat, Charles Louis de, Baron de la Brède et de Montesquieu (1689–1755) DSB
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Institutions mentioned:

Bank of England Bank of England
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Publications cited:

Boyd 1801, Boyd, Walter 1801. A Letter to the Right Honourable William Pitt on the Influence of the Stoppage of Issues in Specie at the Bank of England, on the Prices of Provisions, and Other Commodities, London: J. Wright and J. Mawman
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Smith 1776 Smith, Adam 1776. An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, 2 vols, London: W. Strahan and T. Cadell
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    Observes that 'the progress of commercial philosophy has been much accelerated by the writings of practical men of business' (172). Asserts that the personal knowledge of detail is incompatible with the habits of the statesman or speculative enquirer, making it necessary 'that the labour of accumulating particular facts should be separated from the more liberal task of generalizing these into principles' (172–73). 'In England, which is the native country of political economy, the works contributed by professional men, form a large deposit of authenticated facts'. Considers Henry Thornton's Thornton, Henry (1760–1815) ODNB
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work to be particularly valuable in this regard, although the materials are not well organized and some of the arguments are 'embarrassed'. (173) Regrets that it has not been written comprehensively in the form of a 'general treatise' (174), and seeks to give an 'abstract of its principal contents' (175).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 201–16.

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Art. XXVI. [Review of Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth, by John Playfair]

[Francis Jeffrey] Jeffrey, Francis, Lord Jeffrey (1773–1850) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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/ [William G Maton?] Maton, William George (1774–1835) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Playfair 1802a Playfair, John 1802a. Illustrations of the Huttonian Theory of the Earth, London: Cadell and Davies; Edinburgh: William Creech
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Subjects:

Geology, Mineralogy, Chemistry, Stratigraphy

People mentioned:

Richard Kirwan, Kirwan, Richard (1733–1812) ODNB
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Jean A Deluc, Deluc, Jean André (1727–1817) DSB
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Abraham G Werner, Werner, Abraham Gottlob (1749–1817) DSB
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Robert Jameson Jameson, Robert (1774–1854) DSB
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    Observes: 'The Huttonian theory of the earth, which it is the object if the volume before us to explain and support, is not referable to either of those classes into which geological treatises have been commonly divided. Its author cannot be considered either as a Vulcanist purely, or a Neptunist, since he has asserted the agency both of fire and water, in his system' (201). Later concludes: 'The ability with which he [John Playfair Playfair, John (1748–1819) DSB
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] has combined the complicated materials of his subject, and the correct and luminous order he has observed in the statement of a loose and analogical argument, have given a precision and scientific unity to the system of Dr Hutton Hutton, James (1726–97) DSB
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, in which it was formerly deficient. The task, therefore, both of its advocates and its adversaries, will be hereafter comparatively easy; since it is scarcely possible for any question to remain, either as to the tenets it maintains, or the arguments by which they are to be supported' (216).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 216–37.

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Art. XXVII. [Review of The Crisis of the Sugar Colonies]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

[Stephen] 1802 [Stephen, James] 1802. The Crisis of the Sugar Colonies; or, An Enquiry Into the Objects and Probable Effects of the French Expedition to the West Indies and their Connection with the Colonial Interests of the British Empire. To which are Subjoined, Sketches of a Plan for Settling the Vacant Lands of Trinidada. In Four Letters to the Right Hon. Henry Addington, London: J. Hatchard
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Subjects:

Imperialism, Nutrition, Pharmaceuticals, Aeronautics, Race, Disease, Mental Illness, Instinct, Feeling, Radicalism, Agriculture, Experiment


    The reviewer dislikes the anonymous author's 'predilection for circuitous modes of expression'. Quotes his contrast between mere labour on the one hand, and slavery on the other, which differs from it 'as widely as a nauseous drench in the mouth of an infant, from the medicated milk of its mother'. (218) Observes that the author tries to 'convey the idea of a white man's inferiority to a Negro, in the warfare of the West Indies' by comparing 'the contest to that of an aeronaut with an eagle'. Suggests that this analogy would be more likely to be used 'to pourtray [sic] the superiority of discipline and art over natural advantages'. (219) Gives examples of the author's more eloquent medical imagery. The author believes 'the instinctive dread' that the slaves have of their masters is 'a mysterious charm, which if once broken, cannot be restored'. The reviewer observes that, even if the feeling of slaves towards masters is instinctive rather than rational, it is no more 'anomalous and capricious than the emotions of the maniac, who trembles at the nod of his keeper, from some strange, ideal, and inexpressible dread—then, in a paroxysm of his disease, shakes off this unaccountable obedience—but soon, exhausted by the effort, returns to passive submission'. (224) The author recommends that 'the newly acquired island of Trinidada' (231) should be used as '"a farm of experiment", where the possibility of emancipating the negroes, by slow and prudent means, may be safely and conveniently tried' (232).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 237–45.

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Art. XXVIII. [Review of A Treatise on the Means of Purifying Infected Air, by Louis B Guyton de Morveau]

[John Thomson] Thomson, John (1765–1846) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Guyton de Morveau 1802 Guyton de Morveau, Louis Bernard 1802. A Treatise on the Means of Purifying Infected Air, of Preventing Contagion, and Arresting its Progress, trans. by Robert Hall, London: T. Hurst
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Subjects:

Gas Chemistry, Disease

Institutions mentioned:

Académie des sciences, Paris Académie des Sciences, Paris
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    Concludes: 'The very copious extracts which we have given, will secure us, we trust, from the imputation of having wilfully misrepresented the facts, opinions, and reasonings, which it contains. [...] a regard for the truth obliges us to declare, we have found in it a much less profound discussion of the subject, than, from the well-known talents and information of the author, we were prepared to expect' (244).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 245–52.

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[Review of A Letter to Dr Percival Percival, Thomas (1740–1804) ODNB
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on the Prevention of Infectious Fevers, by John Haygarth]

[John Thomson] Thomson, John (1765–1846) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Haygarth 1801 Haygarth, John 1801. A Letter to Dr. Percival, on the Prevention of Infectious Fevers: And, an Address to the College of Physicians at Philadelphia, on the Prevention of the American Pestilence. Read to the Literary and Philosophical Society of Bath, London: Cadell and Davies
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Subjects:

Disease, Vaccination, Medical Treatment, Medical Practioners

People mentioned:

Edward Jenner, Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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William Cullen Cullen, William (1710–90) DSB
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^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 2 (January 1803)Expand    Contract

Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 253–80.

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Art. I. [Review of The Philosophy of Kant, by Charles F D de Villers]

[Thomas Brown] Brown, Thomas (1778–1820) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Villers 1801 Villers, Charles François Dominique de 1801. Philosophie de Kant; ou, principes fondamentaux de la philosophie transcendentale, Metz: Collignon
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Subjects:

Internationalism, War, Science Communication, Philosophy, Metaphysics, Astronomy, Physics, Mathematics, Light, Politics

People mentioned:

Isaac Newton, Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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William Herschel, Herschel, Sir William (1738–1822) DSB ODNB
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Friedrich Schiller, Schiller, Friedrich (Johann Chrisoph Friedrich von) (1759–1805) CBD
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Johann W von Goethe, Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von (1749–1832) DSB
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Gottfried W Leibniz, Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm (1646–1716) DSB
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Epicurus, Epicurus (341–270 BC) DSB
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Étienne B Abbé de Condillac, Condillac, Étienne B, Abbé de (1714–80) DSB
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François M A de Voltaire, Voltaire, François Marie Arouet de (1694–1778) DSB
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George Berkeley, Berkeley, George (1685–1753) DSB
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David Hume, Hume, David (1711–76) DSB
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Thomas Reid Reid, Thomas (1710–96) ODNB
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Institutions mentioned:

Institut Nationale, Paris Institut Nationale, Paris
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Publications cited:

Kant 1781 Kant, Immanuel 1781. Critik der reinen Vernunft, Riga: J. F. Hartnoch
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    Discusses the notion that 'the sciences' refuse 'every geographical barrier' and considers how this relates to the communication of ideas across political barriers (253). Questions Charles F D de Villers's Villers, Charles François Dominique de (1765–1815) WBI
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dedication of his book to the 'National Institute of France, as the "Tribunal invested with Supreme Jurisdiction in the Empire of the Sciences". States that Villiers is zealous for Immanuel Kant's Kant, Immanuel (1724–1804) DSB
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fame, claiming that he 'is a mathematician, an astronomer, a chemist: in natural history, in physics, in physiology, in history, in languages, and literature, and in the arts; in all the details of geography, as they relate to the exact situation of the parts of the globe, their inhabitants and productions—everything is familiar to him'. Villers also 'contends that the planet Herschell ought rather to have been known to astronomers under another name; as, twenty six years before the discovery of that portion of our system, its existence had been predicted by Kant'. (255) Gives a detailed account of Kant's work as related by Villers.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 281–87.

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Art. II. [Review of Travels in Greece and Turkey, by Charles S Sonnini]

[Alexander Hamilton] Hamilton, Alexander (1762–1824) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Sonnini 1801 Sonnini De Manoncourt, Charles Nicolas Sigisbert 1801. Travels in Greece and Turkey, Undertaken by Order of Louis XVI, and with the Authority of the Ottoman Court, London: T. N. Longman & O. Rees
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Subjects:

Travel, Ancient Authorities, Climatology, Agriculture, Ethnology, Race, Degeneration, Geology, Naturalists


    Quotes Charles N S Sonnini De Manoncourt's Sonnini De Manoncourt, Charles Nicolas Sigisbert (1751–1812) WBI
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description of Egypt as 'the cradle of the arts and sciences and from which the Greeks derived part of their knowledge' while Greece was the 'cradle of graces and good taste' (282). The extract discusses the differences in agricultural cultivation and climate between Egypt and Greece and the effect of this on their respective national characteristics. Sonnini describes the 'Copt, or native of Egypt' as 'lazy and slovenly, clownish and ignorant, unfeeling and superstitious, he has no longer any remembrance, nor even any trace remaining, of the greatness of his ancestors. What a difference between this nation, entirely degenerated, and that which still inhabits the beautiful countries of Greece !' (282–83). The reviewer recounts the 'only two geological speculations in which the author has indulged; only remarking, that neither of them is new' (284). Quotes Sonnini's observation on the eastern Mediterranean: 'we cannot help thinking that this extent of sea, thickly strewn with a multitude of islands has formed a continent in times the most remote; and that a sudden irruption of the waters of the Black sea, earthquakes, and the violent action of volcanoes, have inundated this ancient country of Greece, and torn it into innumerable shreds. [...] Who knows even whether it be not this part of the Mediterranean, rather than in the ocean, that we must look for the famous Atlantis of Plato Plato (428–348/7 BC) DSB
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? [...] The islands of the Ægean sea are the summits of mountains, which belong to a country whose plains have been submerged by a sudden intteruption of the waters of the Black sea' (285). Compares Sonnini's views with Olivier 1801, Olivier, Guillaume Antoine 1801. Travels in the Ottoman Empire, Egypt, and Persia: Undertaken by Order of the Government of France, During the First Six Years of the Republic, London: T. N. Longman & O. Rees, and T. Cadell Jun. and W. Davies
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stating: 'they are both naturalists; and, in this department, much pleasing information is afforded in each' (287)


See also:

[Alexander Hamilton], 'Art. V. [Review of Travels in the Ottoman Empire, by Guillaume A Olivier]', Edinburgh Review, 1 (1802–03), 44–59


Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 287–305.

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Art. III. [Review of Natural Theology, by William Paley ]

Anon

Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Paley 1802 Paley, William 1802. Natural Theology; or, Evidences of the Existence and Attributes of the Deity: Collected from the Appearances of Nature, [London]: R. Faulder
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Subjects:

Natural Theology, Design, Creation, Unbelief, Natural History, Botany, Zoology, Heredity, Evolution

People mentioned:

Marcus T Cicero, Cicero, Marcus Tullius (106–43BC) CBD
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Isaac Newton, Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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Robert Boyle, Boyle, Hon Robert (1627–91) DSB ODNB
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John Ray, Ray, John (1627–1705) DSB
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William Derham, Derham, William (1657–1735) DSB
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Georges L Leclerc, comte de Buffon, Buffon, Georges-Louis Leclerc, comte de (1707–88) DSB
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Erasmus Darwin Darwin, Erasmus (1731–1802) DSB
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    Observes: 'With less learning and less originality than some of his distinguished predecessors, it would be difficult, perhaps, to point out his superior in soundness of judgement, or in vigilant and comprehensive sagacity. With great strength of reasoning and power of decision, he has also united more moderation and liberality of sentiment, than is usually to be found among disputants; and added weight to his argument by a certain plainness and sobriety of manner, that is infinitely better calculated to produce conviction than the sallies of an ambitious eloquence' (287). Asserts: 'No thinking man, we conceive, can doubt that there are marks of design in the universe, and any enumeration of the instances in which this design is manifest, appear, at first sight, to be both unnecessary and impossible. A single example seems altogether as conclusive as a thousand; and he that cannot discover any trace of contrivance in the formation of an eye, will probably retain his atheism at the end of a whole system of physiology' (289). States that whilst there are a number published works that 'promote pious meditation' on the subject of natural theology, 'a work was still wanted [...] in which the evidences of a wise and beneficent Creator might be detailed with sufficient amplitude, while every thing was omitted that the most scrupulous of scepticism could challenge, and in which the fallacy of every atheistical hypothesis might be distinctly exposed' (291). Praises William Paley's Paley, William (1743–1805) DSB
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use of Mechanical phenomena as opposed to human intelligence to support his arguments. States: 'The unbeliever always finds his advantage in referring to a principle of which it must be admitted that he and his antagonist are equally ignorant [...]. To Mechanical phenomena the same evasive reasoning cannot be applied' (296). Discusses Paley's arguments against the assertion that the 'whole system of the universe may be explained from 'a law' or 'the mechanism of its parts'. States that '[a] law presupposes an agent; for it is only the mode according to which an agent proceeds; and mechanism can produce nothing, unless there be a power to whose operations it is subservient. The same censure is passed upon those who would substitute such words as "principle, process, or generation," for a real explanation of cause of any existing phenomena. The internal moulds, by which Buffon keeps his organic particles from running into new combinations, meet with no better treatment; and "the appetencies" of Dr Darwin are explained and disposed of in this manner' (300–01).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 317–30.

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Art. VII. [Review of The History of England, by John Adolphus]

[John A Murray] Murray, Sir John Archibald, Lord Murray (1778?–1859) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Adolphus 1802, Adolphus, John 1802. The History of England, from the Accession of King George the Third, to the Conclusion of Peace in the Year One Thousand Seven Hundred and Eighty-Three, London: T. Cadell, jun. and W. Davies
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Pascal 1656 Pascal, Blaise 1656. Lettre escrite á un provincial par un de ses amis sur le sujet des disputes présentes de la Sorbonne, [Paris?]: [n. pub.]
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Subjects:

Religion, Freethought, Mathematics


    States: 'The Jesuits were first expelled from France, 1594, (though afterwards reestablished;) from Venice, in 1606; from England, 1604. Was all that done by free-thinking philosophers ? The ablest work that was ever published against them [...] was certainly the work of one of the most religious men that ever existed [i.e. Blaise Pascal Pascal, Blaise (1623–62) DSB
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]' (324).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 330–45.

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Art. VIII. [Review of Voyage dans la basse et la haute Egypte, by Dominique V Denon]

Anon

Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Denon1801 Denon, Dominique Vivant 1802. Voyage dans la basse et la haute Égypte, pendant les campagnes du General Bonaparte, Paris: P. Didot
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Subjects:

Exploration, Light, Heat, War, Degeneration


     States that the French troops, 'in passing through the desert [...,] experienced for the first time, that optical deception which makes a burning surface of sand assume the appearance of a lake of water. This appearance the French have denominated mirage; the nature of it is thus explained by M. Denon Denon, Dominique Vivant, baron (1747–1825) WBI
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—"It is an illusion produced by the mirage of salient objects on the oblique rays of the sun, refracted by the heat of the burning soil. [...]" This explanation, is, no doubt, completely satisfactory; though it is rather a new notion we believe, that the rays of the sun can be refracted by heat'. (333–34) Refers to the 'degenerate natives', and observes: 'M. Denon assures us, that while sitting among the ruins of Luxor, he was seriously asked by one of their Sheiks, whether it was the French or the English that had erected these monuments ?' (342).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 345–81.

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Art. IX. [Review of Politique de tous les cabinets de l'Europe, by Louis-Philippe, comte de Ségur]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Ségur 1801 Ségur, Louis-Philippe, comte de 1801. Politique de tous les cabinets de l'Europe: pendant les règnes de Louis XV et de Louis XVI; contenant des pieèces authentiques sur la correspondance secrète du Cte de Broglie, 2nd ed., 3 vols, Paris: F. Buisson
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Subjects:

Politics, Progress, Human Species, Feeling, Astronomy, Natural Law, Discovery, Invention, History of Science, Gravity, Dynamics

People mentioned:

Adam Smith, Smith, Adam (1723–90) ODNB
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David Hume Hume, David (1711–76) DSB
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Publications cited:

Stewart 1792–1827 Stewart, Dugald 1792–1827. Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind, 3 vols, London: A. Strahan, and T. Cadell; Edinburgh: W. Creech
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    Observes that 'the refinements of modern policy, which have sprung from the progressive improvement of the human species, [...] have, in their turn secured that progress.' (345). Later states: 'It is true, that the dictates of feelings not always aimable, and often outrageous, are frequently, more than any impulse of reason, the springs which actuate the operations of [nation] states; but it is equally true, that in all animals the passions themselves are implanted for the wisest of purposes; that instinct is the principle to which, more than reason, the preservation of life, and the maintenance of order in the universe, must be ascribed' (347). Asserts that 'the number of discoveries or inventions, which have been suddenly made in any branch of knowledge, is small indeed. All the more important steps in the progress of the human mind may rather be termed improvements than inventions: they are refinements upon methods formally known—generalizations of ideas previously conceived. By how many small and slowly following steps was the true nature of planetary motions brought to light! By how many insensible gradations did that theory receive its explanation from the great law of gravitation, which, constantly and universally acting, keeps each body in its place, and preserves the arrangement of the whole system' (352–53). In drawing an analogy between the 'balancing theory' (in relation to the European political system) and the planetary system the reviewer states that 'the newly-discovered planets are found to obey the same law that keeps the rest in their orbit [...] even in this enlightened age, we have not yet succeeded in discovering the whole extent of planetary law, or reducing certain apparent irregularities of the system to common principles' (353). Continues: 'This is the balancing theory. It was as much unknown to Athens and Rome, as the Keplerian Kepler, Johannes (1571–1630) DSB
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or Newtonian Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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laws were concealed from Plato Plato (428–348/7 BC) DSB
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and Cicero Cicero, Marcus Tullius (106–43BC) CBD
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, who certainly knew the effect of gravitation upon terrestrial bodies. It has arisen, in the progress of science' (354). When discussing how 'federal power' is impacted on by 'relative interests', draws the following analogy: 'in considering the former we must lay out of view those deranging causes, as we demonstrate (in Dynamics) the properties of the mechanical powers, without taking into view the effects of friction, or the resistance of the medium in which powers operate' (362). Continues at length to relate this 'balancing theory' to the political history of Europe and Britain's relations with its 'natural enemies' and 'natural allies' (373).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 407–12.

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Art. XII. [Review of On the Necessary Truth of Certain Conclusions Obtained by Means of Imaginary Expressions, by Robert Woodhouse]

James Ivory Ivory, James (1765–1842) DSB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Woodhouse 1801 Woodhouse, Robert 1801. 'On the Necessary Truth of Certain Conclusions Obtained by Means of Imaginary Expressions', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 91, 89–119
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Subjects:

Mathematics, Logic

People mentioned:

Gottfried Leibniz Leibniz, Gottfried Wilhelm (1646–1716) DSB
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    Quoting Robert Woodhouse's Woodhouse, Robert (1773–1827) DSB
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defence of imaginary numbers, states: 'The drift of this argument is not very plain. If it is only meant to say that there must be some way or other of accounting for the paradox, that truth is produced by unintelligable operations, or by faulty reasoning, the position will hardly be denied. On the other hand, if it is intended to argue, that every general method, that uniformly leads to true conclusions, must therefore be regulated by the rules of sound logic, the inference cannot be admitted. We are of the opinion that the imaginary arithmetic is one glaring instance of the contrary' (408–09). The review concludes: 'the present paper will be found to contain nothing new or interesting to geometers. It is only incumbent on us to notice, that some just observations occur in discussing the controversy concerning logarithms of negative numbers, towards the end of the paper. We cannot conclude our remarks, without expressing our disapprobation of the mode in which Mr Playfair's Playfair, John (1748–1819) DSB
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method of reasoning is attacked, not openly, and by name, but indirectly, covertly, and by insinuation' (412).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 412–21.

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Art.XIII. [Review of Oupnek'hat, by Abraham H Anquetil-Duperron]

[Alexander Hamilton] Hamilton, Alexander (1762–1824) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Duperron 1801–02 Anquetil-Duperron, Abraham Hyacinthe 1801–02. Oupnek'hat, id est, Secretum tegendum: opus ipsa in India rarissimum, continens antiquam et arcanam, seu theologicam et philosophicam, doctrinam, équatuor sacris Indorum libris, Rak Beid, Djedjr Beid, Sam Beid, Athrban Beid, excerptam: ad verbum, e Persico idiomate, Samskreticis vocabulis intermixto, in Latinum conversum: dissertationibus et annotationibus, difficiliora explanantibus, illustratum, 2 vols, Strasbourg: Levrault
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Subjects:

Ancient Authorities, Superstition, Religion, Reason


    Observes that, 'of the false religions which have successively obtained in the world, the absurd dogmata have frequently furnished a striking contrast with the state of science amongst their followers. [...] the massive structures of ancient Egypt attest considerable progress in mechanics; but the wars of Typhon and Osiris, and the obscene rites of their local deities, are an insult to reason, and to nature. Would we profit by Grecian science, it is to Aristotle Aristotle (384–322 BC) DSB
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, and not Hesiod Hesiod (c. 8th century BC) CBD
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, we must have recourse; yet the old bard was probably the faithful historian of opinions which prevailed more or less generally, till Europe was enlightened by the divine rays of a religion revealed from above. The Coran [sic] relates that Mohammed was transported into the moon; but the Khalifs who succeeded him and implicitly believed in the pretend miracle, employed mathematicians to measure a degree of the circle. From these observations, our reader will possibly infer, that if Indian literature be capable of affording curious or instructive information, it is probably not from the sacred Vedas that the stream will flow' (413–14). Goes on to criticise Abraham H Anquetil-Duperron's Anquetil-Duperron, Abraham Hyacinthe (1731–1805) WBI
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ability to translate the text of the Vedas from either the original Sanscrit or the later Persian translations into Latin; inserts both the original and the translated version of the preface of the Persian translation of the Vedas.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 426–31.

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Art.XV. [Review of Observations on the Two Lately Discovered Celestial Bodies, by William Herschel]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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and [Henry B Parnell] Parnell, Henry Brooke, 1st Baron Congleton (1776–1842) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Herschel 1802 Herschel, William 1802. 'Observations on the Two Lately Discovered Celestial Bodies', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 92, 213–32
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Subjects:

Astronomy, Discovery, Progress, Nomenclature

People mentioned:

Giuseppe Piazzi, Piazzi, Giuseppe (1746–1826) DSB
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Heinrich W M Olbers Olbers, Heinrich Wilhelm Matthias (1758–1840) DSB
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    Gives an overview of William Herschel's Herschel, Sir William (1738–1822) DSB ODNB
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observations of the recently discovered 'supposed planets', Ceres and Pallas, 'or, as he [Herschel] calls them, moving stars' (426). States that Herschel 'maintains, that these bodies are neither [...] comets nor planets, but he gives them the name Asteroids' (427). Objects to 'the unnecessary introduction of new terms into Philosophy'. Observes: 'The science of astronomy is, beyond any other branch of the mixed mathematics, loaded with an obscure and difficult technology. As all nations have been observers of the heavenly bodies, so all languages have contributed to form the nomenclature of the astronomer. [...] Knowing, as we do, the great power of words in misleading and perplexing our ideas, we cannot allow the unnecessary introduction of a new term to escape unnoticed. Where a new object has been discovered, we cheerfully admit the right of the discoverer to give it a new name; but we will not allow a needless multiplication of terms, or an unnecessary alteration in the old classification of things, to be either justifiable or harmless, a substitute for real discovery, or a means of facilitating the progress of invention'. (428) Later asks: 'If a new name must be found, why not call them by some appelation which shall in some degree, be descriptive of, or at least consistent with, their properties? Why not, for instance, call them Concentric Comets, or Planatary Comets, or Cometary Planets? or, if a single term must be found, why may we not coin such a phrase as Planetoid or Cometoid?' (430). Concludes by stating that Herschel's theory of 'the influence of solar spots on the price of grain' is 'hasty and erroneous' (431).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 431–50.

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Art. XVI. [Review of Principes d'économie politique, by Nicolas F Canard]

[Francis Horner] Horner, Francis (1778–1817) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Canard 1801 Canard, Nicolas François 1801. Principes d'économie politique, ouvrage couronné par l'Institut National, dans sa séance du 15 Nivôse an IX (5 Janvier 1801); et depuis rev., corr. et augm. par l'auteur, Paris: F. Buisson
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Subjects:

Political Economy, Mathematics, Metaphysics, Philosophy, Language

People mentioned:

Adam Smith, Smith, Adam (1723–90) ODNB
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John H Tooke, Tooke, John Horne (1736–1812) ODNB
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John Locke Locke, John (1632–1704) DSB
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Institutions mentioned:

Institut Nationale, Paris Institut Nationale, Paris
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    States: 'It may be said of all great and permanant discoveries, which have unfolded the operations of nature, that some occasional gleams of light broke out from time to time, before the full truth was revealed. The whole history of mathematical and physical sciences forms a continued illustration of this remark. [...] In the philosophy of mind, for example, the great fact of association was obscurely percieved by Hobbes Hobbes, Thomas (1588–1679) DSB
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, and even by Aristotle Aristotle (384–322 BC) DSB
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[...] the two great discoveries by which Mr Hume Hume, David (1711–76) DSB
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and Bishop Berkeley Berkeley, George (1685–1753) DSB
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have effected such a memorable revolution in metaphysics, the correct analysis of our ideas of cause, and the precise limitation of our knowledge of external substances, may be traced, the former in the writings of Barrow Barrow, Isaac (1630–77) ODNB
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and Aquinas Thomas Aquinas, Saint (1225–74) DSB
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, the latter in the sceptical system of Democritus Democritus (late 5th century BC) DSB
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. The political economist might adduce similar instances from the history of his science' (446).



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 450–56.

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Art. XVII. [Review of The Bakerian Lecture on the Theory of Light and Colours, by Thomas Young]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Young 1802a Young, Thomas 1802a. 'The Bakerian Lecture: On the Theory of Light and Colours', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London, 92, 12–48
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Subjects:

Light, Hypothesis, Societies, Truth, Publishing, Periodicals, Controversy, Lectures, Gender, Institutions, Ether

People mentioned:

Leonhard Euler, Euler, Leonhard (1707–83) DSB
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Robert Hooke, Hooke, Robert (1635–1703) DSB
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Christiaan Huygens, Huygens, Christiaan (1629–95) DSB
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Nicholas Malebranche Malebranche, Nicholas (1638–1715) DSB
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Institutions mentioned:

Royal Society Royal Society of London
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Publications cited:

Young1802c, Young, Thomas 1802. Syllabus of a Course of Lectures on Natural and Experimental Philosophy, London: Royal Institution
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Newton 1687, Newton, Isaac 1687. Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica, Londini: Jussu Societatis Regiae ac Typis Josephi Streater
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Newton 1704 Newton, Isaac 1704. Opticks; or, A Treatise of the Reflexions, Refractions, Inflextions and Colours of Lights. Also Two Treatises of the Species and Magnitude of Curvilinear Figures, London: Sam. Smith and Benj. Walford
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    Begins: 'As this paper contains nothing which deserves the name, either of experiment or discovery, and as it is in fact destitute of every species of merit, we should allowed it to pass among the multitude of those articles which must always find admittance into the collections of a Society which is pledged to publish two or three volumes every year. [...] But we have of late observed in the physical world a most unaccountable predilection for vague hypothesis daily gaining ground; and we are mortified to see that the Royal Society, forgetful of those improvements in science to which it owes its origin, and neglecting the precepts of its most illustrious members, is now, by the publication of such papers, giving the countenance of its highest authority to dangerous relaxations in the principles of physical logic' (450–51). Relates that Thomas Young Young, Thomas (1773–1829) DSB
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'introduced himself to the literary world, by a few desultory remarks upon the theory which he appeared to think new, but which had been previously exposed and refuted—the muscularity of the crystalline lens. Soon after this he retracted his opinion; and a year or two ago he again brought it forward' (451). Comments: 'Were we to take the trouble of refuting him, he might tell us, My opinion is changed, and I have abandoned that hypothesis: but here is another for you. We demand, if the world of science, which Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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once illuminated, is to be changable in its modes as the world of taste, which is directed by the nod of a silly woman, or a pampered fop? Has the Royal Society degraded its publications into bulletins of new and fasionable theories for ladies who attend the Royal Institution Royal Institution of Great Britain
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?' (452). Proceeds to outline and refute Young's version of the 'Eulerian hypothesis'.



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 457–60.

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Art. XVIII. [Review of An Account of Some Cases of the Production of Colours, by Thomas Young]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Young 1802b Young, Thomas 1802b. 'An Account of Some Cases of the Production of Colours, Not Hitherto Described', Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, 92, 387–97
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Subjects:

Light, Heat, Chemistry, Hypothesis, Institutions, Discovery, Soceities, Periodicals

People mentioned:

Issac Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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Institutions mentioned:

Royal Society Royal Society of London
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Publications cited:

Newton 1704 Newton, Isaac 1704. Opticks; or, A Treatise of the Reflexions, Refractions, Inflextions and Colours of Lights. Also Two Treatises of the Species and Magnitude of Curvilinear Figures, London: Sam. Smith and Benj. Walford
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    Begins: 'We are sorry to say that Dr Young Young, Thomas (1773–1829) DSB
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is by no means more successful in making observations and experiments, than in forming systems. The new case of colours he claims to have discovered, has been observed a thousand times; and he has only the merit of giving an absurd and contradictory explanation of it' (457). Gives a critical account of Young's observations regarding 'the coloured images which appear to surround a luminous body, when a hair is interposed near the eye', 'the colours of mixed plates', and the 'blue colour of the lower part of a candle flame' (457–59). Later comments: 'we cannot conclude our review of these articles, without entreating, for a moment, the attention of that illustrious body, which has admitted, of late years, so many paltry and unsubstantial papers into its Transactions Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society (1665–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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. Great as the services are which the Royal Society has rendered to the world and valuable as the papers have been in every volume, (not less valuable, surely since the accession of the present excellent president [ i.e. Joseph Banks Banks, Sir Joseph (1743–1820) DSB ODNB
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]), we think on the benefits which it has conferred, with feelings of warmest gratitude. We only wish that those feelings should be unmingled by any ideas of regret, from the want of selection, to which we are adverting; and that it should cease to give its countenance to such vain theories as those which we find mingled, in this volume, with a vast body of important information' (459–60).


See also:

[Henry P Brougham], 'Art. XVII. [Review of The Bakerian Lecture on the Theory of Light and Colours, by Thomas Young]', Edinburgh Review, 1 (1802–03), 450–56


Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 460–66.

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Art.XIX. [Review of Icones Herniarum, by Peter Camper]

[John Thomson] Thomson, John (1765–1846) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Camper 1801 Camper, Peter 1801. Petri Camperi Icones Herniarum, ed. by Sam. Thom. Soemmerring, Frankfurt am Main: Varrentrapp et Wenner
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Subjects:

Anatomy, Surgery

People mentioned:

Henry Cline, Cline, Henry (1750–1827) ODNB
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Pierre J Desault Desault, Pierre Joseph (1744–95) WBI
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Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 466–74.

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Art.XX. [Review of Commentaries on the History and Cure of Diseases, by William Heberden]

[John Thomson] Thomson, John (1765–1846) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Heberden 1802 Heberden, William 1802. Commentaries on the History and Cure of Diseases, London: T. Payne
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Subjects:

Disease, Observation, Reason, Methodology, Quackery, Diet, Medical Treatment, Physiology, Gravity, Metaphysics, Progress

People mentioned:

William H Wollaston, Wollaston, William Hyde (1766–1828) DSB
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Nicolas L Vauquelin, Vauquelin, Nicolas Louis (1763–1829) DSB
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Antoine F de Fourcroy Fourcroy, Antoine François de (1755–1809) DSB
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    Observes: 'It seems now beginning to be understood, what indeed reason and example might have taught us long ago, that the science of medicine can only be improved by observation and experience, by attending to the animal body, both in health and disease, and tracing their general laws' (466). Discusses the different meanings of 'experience', stating that the 'term has been frequently misapplied' (467). Quotes from William Heberden Heberden, William, the elder (1710–1801) ODNB
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the claim: 'the art of healing [...] has scarcely hitherto had any guide, but the flow of experience, and has yet made no illustrious advances by the help of reason: nor will it probably make any, till providence thinks fit to bless mankind, by sending into the world some superior genius, capable of contemplating the animated world with the sagacity shewn by Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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in the inanimate; and discovering that great principle of life, upon which its existence depends, and by which all its functions are governed and directed'. The reviewer comments: 'If no progress can be made in the art of healing, till another Newton arises to proclaim that great principle of life, and determine its laws, our expectations must surely be very hopeless. The discovery of Newton was not the discovery of a cause, but the generalization of a particular fact. [...] The questions concerning vitality, bear the same relation to the study of physiology, and the practice of medicine, as the metaphysical discussions concerning materiality, or immateriality of the soul, to the phenomena of the mind'. (474)



Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 475–85.

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Art.XXI. [Review of Elements of the Philosophy of the Mind, by Thomas Belsham]

[Thomas Brown] Brown, Thomas (1778–1820) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Belsham 1801 Belsham, Thomas 1801. Elements of the Philosophy of the Mind, and of Moral Philosophy, London: J. Johnson
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Subjects:

Philosophy, Feelings, Materialism, Psychology, Religion, Belief, Ethics, Truth, Crime, Utility, Reason, Metaphysics

People mentioned:

David Hartley, Hartley, David (1705–57) DSB
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Plato, Plato (428–348/7 BC) DSB
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George Berkeley Berkeley, George (1685–1753) DSB
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Edinburgh Review,  1 (1802–03), 495–510.

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Art.XXIII. [Review of Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, Volume 5, Part 2 (1802)]

[Henry P Brougham] Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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WIVP: The Wellesley Index to Victorian Periodicals 1824-1900, ed. by Walter E. Houghton, et al., 5 vols, Toronto: University of Toronto Press; London: Routledge and Kegan Paul, 1966–89
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Genre:

Review

Publications reviewed:

Blizard 1802, Blizard, Thomas 1802. 'A Description of an Extra-Uterine Foetus', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 5, 189–92
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Playfair 1802b, Playfair, John 1802b. 'Meteorological Abstract for the Years 1797, 1798, and 1799', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 5, 193–202
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Ivory 1802, Ivory, James 1802. 'A New and Universal Solution of Kepler's Problem', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 5, 203–46
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Wallace 1802, Wallace, William 1802. 'A New Method of Expressing the Coefficients of the Developement of the Algebraic Formula (a²+b²—2abcof[phi])[to the power n], by Means of the Perimeters of Two Ellipses, when n Denotes the Half of Any Odd Number. With an Appendix, Containing the Investigation of a Formula for the Rectification of any Arch of any Ellipse', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 5, 251–93
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Kennedy 1802, Kennedy, Robert 1802 .'Chemical Analysis of an Uncommon Species of Zeolite', Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh, 5, 295–303
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, Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh Transactions of the Royal Society of Edinburgh (1783–1900+) BUCOP
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[2 Review of A Description of an Extra-Uterine Fætus, by Thomas Blizard]

Subjects:

Anatomy, Obstetrics


[3 Review of Meteorological Abstract, by John Playfair]

Subjects:

Meteorology


[4 Review of A New and Universal Solution of Kepler's Problem, by James Ivory]

Subjects:

Astronomy, Mathematics

People mentioned:

Johannes Kepler, Kepler, Johannes (1571–1630) DSB
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Issac Newton, Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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Leonhard Euler, Euler, Leonhard (1707–83) DSB
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Girolamo Cardano Cardano (Cardan), Girolamo (1501–76) DSB
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Publications cited:

Newton 1687, Newton, Isaac 1687. Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica, Londini: Jussu Societatis Regiae ac Typis Josephi Streater
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Euler 1748 Euler, Leonhard 1748. Introductio in Anaysin Infinitorum, Lausanne: Marcum-Michaelem Bousquet & Socios
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[6 Review of A New Method, &c., by William Wallace]

Subjects:

Astronomy, Mathematics

People mentioned:

Giulio C Fagnano Dei Toschi, Fagnano Dei Toschi, Giulio Carlo (1682–1766) DSB
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Joseph L Lagrange Lagrange, Joseph Louis (1736–1813) DSB
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    Observes: 'Whilst so much remains yet to be done for the Mathematics by all nations; and, to take a more contracted view, while so much is wanting in this country to render us at all fit for competition with the mathematicians of the Continent, any such appearance of high preeminence in this line, as we have now been contemplating, delights us—in a degree which we are not likely to be followed by the sympathy of all our readers' (510).



[7 Review of Chemical Analysis of an Uncommon Species of Zeolite, by Robert Kennedy]

Subjects:

Chemistry, Geology, Experiment



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