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Punch, Or the London Charivari [1st]  Introduction
Volume 34  (January to June 1858)

Punch,  34 (1858), [viii].

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Notes

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Psychology, Cruelty, Amusement, Expertise


    An extensive summary of Anon, 'The American Horse-Tamer', Punch, 34 (1858), 59, an article describing the system of an 'American gentleman, RAREY [John S Rarey Rarey, John Solomon (1828–66) WBI
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]' for 'breaking and subduing horses'. Explains how Rarey accomplished this feat by techniques which included 'close observation of the horse, his disposition and of the motives which work within the recesses of the equine breast'. Stresses that Rarey's largely successful system does not involve any cruelty to the animal, 'instruments or drugs'.



Issue 859* (26 December 1857) 'Punch's Almanack for 1858'Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), [ii].

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Note for the Naturalists

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Natural History, Taxonomy


Punch,  34 (1858), [iii].

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Recreations in Natural History

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Animal Behaviour, Extinction, Zoological Gardens, Representation


    Reporting the reintroduction of the dodo into England, describes the habitat and eating habits of the animal, and notes that it supports the accuracy of John Savery's Savery, John (fl. 1858) PU1/34/1*2
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drawing of the animal in the Ashmolean Museum Ashmolean Museum, Oxford
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. Explains how David W Mitchell Mitchell, David William (1813–59) WBI
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will help the animal to continue its strange eating habits in the Zoological Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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.



Punch,  34 (1858), [iv].

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Recreations in Natural History

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Instinct


    Describes the discovery of some bats in the west of England which have been trained to carry letters between lovers, and repeats the claim of Rev. Henry Walsingham Walsingham, Rev. Henry (fl. 1858) PU1/34/1x/3
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that the bats are intelligent enough to gauge the appropriate moment to fly around his church.



Punch,  34 (1858), [v].

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Stopping the Teeth

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Commerce, Surgery


Punch,  34 (1858), [vii].

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The Mermaid's Haunt

Swain Sc Swain, Joseph (1820–1909) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

Swain Sc Swain, Joseph (1820–1909) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Geology, Gender, Amateurism


    Shows several young women on a beach, some of whom are sketching and some of whom hold geologists' hammers ready to crack rocks open.



Punch,  34 (1858), [vii].

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Fellowship with the Oppressed

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Universities, Sound

Institutions mentioned:

University of Cambridge University of Cambridge
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Publications cited:

Bacon 1620 Bacon, Francis 1620. Instauratio magna, London: Joannem Billium typographum regium
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Punch,  34 (1858), [viii].

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Scientific Enthusiast

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Electricity, Meteorology, Heroism

People mentioned:

Benjamin Franklin Franklin, Benjamin (1706–90) DSB
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Punch,  34 (1858), [viii].

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Term of Medical Art

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Commerce


Punch,  34 (1858), [ix].

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Choice of Friends

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Surgery


Punch,  34 (1858), [ix].

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Problem for Senior Wranglers

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics, Education, Gender, Amusement


    'Bisect the modern bells and find the real woman'.



Punch,  34 (1858), [x].

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Recreations in Natural History

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Physiology, Light


    Describes a salamander, domesticated by the Bachuela Indians, which emits light from round spots, and, unlike most lizards, can prove the 'allegation of the philosopher that the Salamander could resist the action of the fire'.



Punch,  34 (1858), [xi].

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Education for Animals

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Education

Publications cited:

Hogg's Instructor Hogg's Weekly Instructor (1845–49) Hogg's Instructor (1849–55) Titan (1856–59) Waterloo Directory
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Punch,  34 (1858), [xi].

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Recreations in Natural History

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Monstrosities, Animal Development


    Describes a report of five kittens who, having been tossed into a pond in Lincolnshire, were later found to have been raised by a carp to be amphibious. Adds that the young carp have learnt how to mew and that the developed cats stalked a water rat.



Punch,  34 (1858), [xi].

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Parochial Economy

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Commerce, Class


    'Continue to underpay the Workhouse Doctor, and then you will probably render his situation a sinecure'.



Punch,  34 (1858), [xii].

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Unpublished Prize at the Cattle Show

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Steam-power


    'Ten pounds to MR. BRUNEL Brunel, Isambard Kingdom (1806–59) ODNB
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, for the best hydraulic Ram. Reared upon timber and iron. By Steam, out of Boiler. On view at Millwall'. The reference is to the SS Great Eastern SS Great Eastern
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, which was built at J Scott Russell & Co.'s Shipyard, Millwall Russell (J Scott) & Co.—Shipyard, Millwall
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.



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Issue 860 (2 January 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 2.

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ADVERTISEMENT

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Transport, Medical Practitioners, Commerce


    Requests a nurse 'to superintend the nursing of a line of Omnibuses, which are intefering with the business of an Opposition Company'. The duties of the nurse include taking customers away from rival firms and using verbal abuse to deter passengers from riding on the more comfortable vehicles of the rival firm.



Punch,  34 (1858), 7.

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A Good Opening for Quacks

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery; Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Crime, Disease, Medical Practitioners, Commerce, Quackery, Charlatanry


    Describes the case of John E Stephens Stephens, John Edward (1820–70) WBI The Times, 2 December 1857, p. 11f
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, a former Army Army
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surgeon and manager of the failed London and Eastern Banking Corporation London and Eastern Banking Corporation
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, who failed in his attempt to secure the adjournment of a bankruptcy charge against him on medical grounds, as he was unable to produce a medical certificate to confirm his 'nervous suffering'. Points out that Stephens was not allowed to certify his own illness and suggests that he should have escaped the bankruptcy charges by disguising himself. Expecting similar cases of bankrupts who claim to suffer from 'malades imaginaires'. Suggests an 'opening for the Faculty of Quacks, who will not be deterred by any squeamishness of conscience from furnishing false evidence to support a patient's plea for the adjournment of his case'. Presents a fictional advertisement from a 'RETIRED PHYSICIAN' offering to supply medical certificates to those facing trial. It boasts that 'The Physicians, having mastered the slang of the profession, can couch his statements in such highly scientific verbiage, that he will warrant that their genuineness will always pass unquestioned'.



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Issue 861 (9 January 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 14.

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Tremendous Christmas Tree

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Pharmaceuticals, Quackery, Amusement, Display


    Describes the Christmas tree on display at the Apothecaries' Hall Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London—Apothecaries' Hall
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. The tree is decorated with illuminated 'chemists' bottles and doctor's lamps', as well as 'vials of the most fashionable medicines', but only 'a few patent medicines'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 14.

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A Simple Reason

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Accidents, Engineering

Institutions mentioned:

SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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Punch,  34 (1858), 17.

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Our Absent Friends

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Medical Practitioners, Crime


    Referring to the case of John E Stephens Stephens, John Edward (1820–70) WBI The Times, 2 December 1857, p. 11f
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(see Anon, 'A Good Opening for Quacks', Punch, 34 (1858), 7) suggests the possibility of an increase in 'a certain class of nervous ailments and disorders' caused by 'free living on other people's money'. Describes how patients suffering from this condition become confused and unable to answer questions. Despite his own medical training, Stephens could not relieve his nervous disorder and resorted to travelling to the cooler climate of Scotland. Describes how the 'keen' environment of the north caused him to loose his breath, a condition from which he suffered when confined in court. Proceeds to describe the case of 'those interesting invalids, poor MESSRS. CAMERON and WAUGH', who sought to alleviate their nervous disorders by 'Living in retirement at some continental watering-place'. The references are to Hugh I Cameron Cameron, Hugh Innes (1820–58) WBI
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, the fraudulent general manager of the failed Royal British Bank Royal British Bank
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, and William P Waugh Waugh, William Petrie (fl.1853–65) Taylor 2005
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, director of Stephens's London and Eastern Banking Company London and Eastern Banking Corporation
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. Punch clearly believes that such medical complaints are bogus and that 'victims' escape to foreign climes to avoid publicity. Returning to the case of Stephens, Punch thinks that the case will involve 'an attack of the criminal law fever' and a 'smartish touch of the collarer'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 18.

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[Manchester Economics]

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Invention, Political Economy, Industry


    The caption reads 'Our Manchester Friend tries his hand at "Spinning" for Jack'. The illustration shows a man (a representative of the Manchester school of economics) fishing with a line that is being fed off a spinning jenny, on the treadle of which he rests his foot.



Punch,  34 (1858), 20.

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How to Sweeten the Serpentine

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Chemistry, Sanitation, Pharmaceuticals, Amusement, Class, Invention

Institutions mentioned:

Army


    Describes a proposal by a correspondent in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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to replace the foul liquid of the Serpentine Serpentine, lake, Hyde Park
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with fresh salt water from Brighton. Questions why 'chemical science' cannot stop the Serpentine turning into a 'cesspool' 'by a combination of its resources with the scheme of the Artesian well'. Believes the 'sanitary revolution' may be 'made with rose-water', so that the Serpentine could be 'imbued' with perfumes. In the meantime, suggests that the 'superior classes' and the 'British Public' would benefit from fresh water being conveyed into the lake, and thinks 'any philosophical propounder of a plan for the replacement of the Serpentine slush by salt-water, would quietly accept the advice to describe his invention to the Marines'.



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Issue 862 (16 January 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 23.

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The Leviathan Launch

Tom Tug U Tug, Tom
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Bladdery Pop U Pop, Bladdery
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Salmo Ferox U Ferox, Salmo
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2Tycho Brahe U Brahe, Tycho
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Abraham Lincoln U Lincoln, Abraham
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Nicholas Flam Wiseman (Cardinal) U Wiseman, Nicholas Flam (Cardinal)
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Record Office, Tuesday U Record Office
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Dunn Brown U Brown, Dunn
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John Russell U John Russell
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Willjabber Frikel U Frikel, Willjabber
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Genre:

Introduction; Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Steamships, Engineering, Accidents, Engineers, Technology, Aeronautics, Electricity, Military Technology, Religious Authority, Government, Magic

People mentioned:

Tycho Brahe, Brahe, Tycho (1546–1601) DSB
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Abraham Lincoln, Lincoln, Abraham (1809–65) CBD
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Nicholas P S Wiseman, Wiseman, Nicholas Patrick Stephen (1802–65) ODNB
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Alexander Haldane, Haldane, Alexander (1800–82) ODNB
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Lord John Russell, Russell, Lord John, 1st Earl Russell (1792–1878) ODNB
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Wiljalba Frikell Frikell, Wiljalba (1818–1903) RLIN
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    Boasts that had Isambard K Brunel Brunel, Isambard Kingdom (1806–59) ODNB
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called on the services of Mr Punch, the SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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would have been launched 'without the slightest difficulty'. Appends a sample of spoof letters from the more than 1500 which Mr Punch claims to have received on the subject. Tom Tug accuses Brunel of knowing 'nothing about anything and suggests launching the iron ship using 'ten large magnets, to be prepared under DR. FARADAY's Faraday, Michael (1791–1867) DSB
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direction'. Bladdery Pop suggests attaching 500,000 children's balloons to the vessel, thus lifting it into the air. Salmo Ferrex suggests tying the ship to 'These scoundrel Sepoys' who could be whipped into dragging the ship into the water. Tycho Brahe recommends sending an electric current through the metal vessel and thus forcing it to jump into motion. Abraham Lincoln suggests using the power of recoil from fifty cannons fixed in the ship, whilst Nicholas Flam Wiseman recalls the historical example of an ancient Roman vessel which was moved when a 'Vestal Virgin tied her girdle' to it. 'The Editor of the Record Record (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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' thinks that the only way to solve the problem is to remove the satanic name of the ship and to invite some 'really sincere and pious men' to hold services on the ship. Dunn Brown recommends consulting the shipowner and fraudulent director of the failed Royal British Bank Royal British Bank
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, Humphrey Brown Brown, Humphrey (1803—60) WBI
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, since he contrived to have ships in 'two places at once'. John Russell thinks that the ship will move in obedience to a House of Commons House of Commons
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resolution. Finally, Willjabber Frikel promises to put the ship in water by 'his little magics'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 24.

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A Woman of Real Nerve

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Human Species, Taxonomy, Extinction

People mentioned:

Georges Cuvier, Cuvier, Georges (1769–1832) DSB
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Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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Punch,  34 (1858), 27.

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Tiger-Slaying in Kamschatka

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Hunting, Animal Behaviour

Publications cited:

Rice 1857 Rice, William 1857. Tiger-Shooting in India: Being an Account of Hunting Experiences on Foot in Rajpootana, During the Hot Seasons, From 1850 to 1854, London: Smith, Elder, and Co.
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Punch,  34 (1858), 27.

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A New Saw for an Old One

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Accidents, Engineering

Institutions mentioned:

SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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Punch,  34 (1858), 29.

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Comic Commercial Intelligence

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Chemistry, Language, Gender, Government, Education


    Derides the use of 'pots' as an abbreviation for 'Potash' in 'commercial intelligence', a usage that confounds the 'female aristocracy', 'Members of Parliament', and 'unscientific people in general'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 30.

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To the Universe

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Pharmaceuticals, Reading, Periodicals


    Advertisement from a 'RETIRED PHYSICIAN' who has discovered a cure for a host of 'real and imaginary' ailments. This cure turns out to be Punch, which has 'wonderful restorative and brain-healing qualities' and has cured the advertiser's daughter. He has 'prescribed the remedy to countless myriads of sufferers in all parts of the world, and he has never failed in making them completely healthy in their minds'. Heartily recommends this 'recipe'.



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Issue 863 (23 January 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 31.

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The Rival Powers at Naples

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Geology, Religious Authority, Religion, Superstition


    Describes the contest between the earthquake and priests at Naples, both of which are trying to be 'the more shocking'. Notes from a correspondent's report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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that priests and their flocks flogged themselves with ropes in chastisement for their sins, but observes that 'the earthquake had the advantage of the priests in shaking, even to overthrow, the monuments, at least, of their superstition'. One of these monuments is a Madonna 'who had granted some special favours during the earthquakes'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 33.

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Experience of a Medical Student

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Lecturing, Mental Illness


    Reports on Alexander Peddie Peddie, Alexander (fl. 1850) WBI
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who gave a paper to the Medico-Chirurgical Society of Edinburgh Medico-Chirurgical Society of Edinburgh
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on the 'treatment of drunken maniacs' and covered the topic 'in an exhaustive manner'. Observes that the 'exhaustiveness' of Peddie's lecture is 'too general' a 'characteristic of scientific lectures; for most of those discourses exhaust either the patience or the nervous energy of the audience'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 39.

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Sale of Custom-House Officers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Natural History, Ethnography, Specimen Trading

Institutions mentioned:

Customs Customs
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    Discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of the arrival in Southampton docks of a shipment, addressed to Dr Schwarz of Germany (possibly anthropolgist Eduard Schwarz Schwarz, Eduard (1831–62) WBI
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), of natural history specimens including 'the head of negro preserved in brandy in a jar'. Notes that a trick was played on custom officials who evidently tasted the 'spirituous liquor' in which these gruesome specimens were preserved. Henceforth, the officials will have to 'assure themselves that the brandy in which alleged anatomical preparations are imported, really contains those objects of medical science'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 39.

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Another Chance for the 'Record'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Accidents, Engineering, Religious Authority


    Observes that the idea of a Sunday tide floating the SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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provides an opportunity for the Record Record (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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to denounce the 'wickedness of setting the tide to work on a Sunday'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 43.

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An Abuse that Needs Ventilation

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Hospitals, Sanitation

Institutions mentioned:

General Lying-in Hospital General Lying-in Hospital
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Punch,  34 (1858), 44.

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An Awful Wreck

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Cultural Geography


    Describes the interpretation by some 'savages' of a mysterious iron structure cast on an African shore. Notes that they thought it might be the 'ribs of some monster Leviathan SS Leviathan
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' but that it turned out to be 'the mangled remains of a lady's Crinoline'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 49.

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Statistics on Smoking. From Our Own Tobacco-Stopper

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Spoof

Subjects:

Narcotics, Controversy, Medical Treatment, Health, Disease


    Noting the continuation of the 'Tobacco Controversy', provides a spoof summary of an unpublished report by a 'Committee of tobacco-stoppers', which sought evidence from 1500 smokers on whether smoking was harmful and what counted as 'excessive'. The survey found that most smokers think excessive smoking is an impossibility, that politicians take tobacco to stop the 'narcoticism' of their parliamentary speeches, and that medical students only smoke 'medicinally' and think that it provides a 'fumigant protective from infection'. It was also judged a remedy for bronchitis and only one gentleman had injured himself through smoking—by smoking 'underneath the blankets of his bed'.



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Issue 864 (30 January 1858)Expand    Contract

No Articles Indexed

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Issue 865 (6 February 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 57.

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A Railway Treasure

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Time, Technology,


    Announcing the publication of a new 'Railway Guide', the writer hopes the work will contain information on 'how long each train will be detained behind its time on the journey' and likely places and times of collision. Also hopes it will include a 'Railway Pronouncing Dictionary', which will help passengers to understand guards and porters and to 'get out at the right station'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 57.

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The Newest Nouveauté de Paris

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Amusement, Engineering, Gender


    Describes 'La Crinoline de Leviathan', a new petticoat whose size, sluggish properties, difficulty of launching, and ability to attract crowds of sightseers, are clearly modelled on the SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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, the giant ship which was finally launched on 31 January 1858.



Punch,  34 (1858), 57.

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Wet Packing

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Hydropathy


    Announces that 'packing patients in wet sheets' was practiced 'on patient travellers in hotels' before it was allegedly discovered by Vincenz Priessnitz Priessnitz, Vincenz (1799–1851) WBI
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.



Punch,  34 (1858), 59.

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The American Horse-Tamer

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Animal Development, Education


    Discusses the power of 'the American, John S. Rarey Rarey, John Solomon (1828–66) WBI
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[...] over untrained and vicious horses'. Notes that the horse tamer 'communicated his secret to Sir Richard Airey Airey, Richard, Baron Airey (1803–81) ODNB
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', who allegedly told Punch that Rarey's secret involved telling the horse, 'If you don't obey, old hoss, I guess I'll read you something out the Morning Star Morning Star (1856–69) Waterloo Directory
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'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 60.

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Concession to the Peace Society Peace Society
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Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Commerce


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Issue 866 (13 February 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 62–63.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Ancient Authorities, Monstrosities, Natural History, Politics, Government

People mentioned:

Pliny Pliny (Gaius Plinius Secundus) (c. 23–79) DSB
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Publications cited:

Pinnock [1815?] [Pinnock, William] [1815?]. A Catechism of Geography, Bristol: Philip Rose
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Punch,  34 (1858), 63.

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A Warning from an Observatory

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Politics

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Observatory, Greenwich


    Noting that Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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of France has compared himself to Julius Caesar Caesar, Julius (Gaius Julius) (100–44 BC) ODNB
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, discusses George B Airy's Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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pamphlet and map (Airy 1852 Airy, George Biddell 1852. On the Place of Caesar's Departure from Gaul for the Invasion of Britain, and the Place of his Landing in Britain, with an Appendix of the Battle of Hastings, London: J. B. Nichols and Sons
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) which prove that Caesar 'did not come to Dover', but is more likely to have arrived in Pevensey.



Punch,  34 (1858), 63.

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The Sea-Serpent Again

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Monstrosities, Animal Behaviour, Controversy


    Discusses the observation of the 'Great Sea Serpent' by a 'British navigator'. Asks 'Where, if there is a serpent of the deep [...] Can that extraordinary reptile keep', especially since, as 'an amphibious creature', he 'can't be always swimming in the sea'. Paraphrasing a line from William Shakespeare's Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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Macbeth, wonders whether the serpent is not 'a false creation, / Proceeding from the grog-oppressed brain', but notes that those who saw it 'say they saw him plain, / Without the customary duplication'. Satisfied that the beast is 'a long way out at sea; / For nowhere else that monster doth appear', and can only 'conjecture' over whether 'a Sea Serpent does or does not swim'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 63.

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The Doomed Ship

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Religious Authority


    Announces the 'doom of the SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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' and expects that the ship 'must be lost, or broken up, or other way swept off from the face of the waters'. Implicitly (but not seriously) agreeing with the Record's Record (1828–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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view that the ship's satanic name had determined its ugly fate, observes that Isambard K Brunel Brunel, Isambard Kingdom (1806–59) ODNB
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was 'misguided' to try to launch the ship on a Sunday. Grieves over the ship's fate but thinks that soon 'not an atom of the ill-starred ship will be distinguishable'. Adds that the Record had already begun writing a leader on the disaster and notes the horror of Record readers at news of the ship's Sunday launch.



Punch,  34 (1858), 68.

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Wedding Favours

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steam-power, Mathematics, Steamships


Punch,  34 (1858), 69.

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New Police Divisions

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Crime


    Responding to the French reaction to a recent attempt to assassinate Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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, reports that an 'imperial decree has just appeared in Paris for the creation of the five great military commands, whose duties are to extend over the preservation of order, and the annihilation of liberty, in the British Empire'. Asserts that the five military divisions will cover Leicester Square, Soho, Birmingham, Guernsey, and Jersey, and that they will communicate with the Ministry of Police in Paris by telegraph.



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Issue 867 (20 February 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 78.

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Punch's Police Report. Important Proceedings Under the Common Lodging House Act

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Disease, Sanitation, Cultural Geography, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Politics


    Describes a spoof legal case in which 'CHARLES LOUIS NAPOLEON' (i.e. Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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) accuses 'MR. JOHN BULL, a keeper of a Common Lodging House, much frequented by foreigners' (i.e. England), with 'various offences under the Common Lodging Houses Act'. Mr Punch, the 'Magistrate', cross-examines Napoleon about his claim that the landlord had neglected to tell the police about 'dangerous cases of contagious or epidemic disorder', and that he had been attacked by 'La Fièvre Rouge'. Napoleon later reveals that he is a medical practitioner who has specialised in the 'treatment of this very disorder' and describes how he sought to treat the disease with blood-letting, change of air, administering cayenne, and preventing 'mental exertion'. At the end of the trial the magistrate concludes that 'there was no proof that the defendant knew of the existence of the alleged cases of the very serious disorder deposed to by the principal witness' and that he was 'not bound to inform the police of suspected cases'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 79.

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The Marriage and the Music-Shops

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships

Institutions mentioned:

SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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Issue 868 (27 February 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 84.

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Corporation Reform

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Health


    Responding to news of the publication of 'Dietary Self Cure of Corpulency' (probably a reference to one of the editions of Moore 1856 Moore, Alfred William [1856]. Corpulency; i.e. Fat or Embonpoint in Excess. Letters to the Medical Times, by A. W. Moore, Explaining Briefly His Newly Discovered Diet System to Reduce Weight and Benefit the Health, London: printed for the author
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) , predicts that it will contain suggestions such as a diet of 'biscuits and water', or of things which one particularly hates. Notes Charles J H Dickens's Dickens, Charles John Huffam (1812–70) ODNB
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remark that 'breakfast off a cigar' would preserve the figure, advice that it recommends to 'a young swell who is anxious lest he should become swollen'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 87.

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The Phantom of the Deep

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Monstrosities, Supernaturalism, Spiritualism, Natural Law


    Reports on the observation of a sea serpent off Saint Helena, which seems to be a favourite location for the monster. Speculates that 'if there is any truth in the theory of the transmigration of the souls', then the sea serpent's soul will haunt the vicinity of Saint Helena. Notes that 'the age of prodigies and portents is fast reviving', with the publication of a work entitled 'Spirit Drawings' (possibly a reference to Wilkinson 1858 Wilkinson, Walter Meacock 1858. Spirit Drawings: A Personal Narrative, London: Chapman & Hall
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). Goes on to discuss the frontispiece of a work entitled 'Spirit Manifestations' (possibly a reference to Dods 1854 Dods, John Bovee [1854]. Spirit Manifestations Examined and Explained: Judge Edmonds Refuted; or, An Exposition of the Involuntary Powers and Instincts of the Human Mind, New York: De Witt & Davenport
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) and again suggests that this signals the revival of more ghostly portents. Returning to the subject of the sea serpent, claims that it is the spirit of Emperor Napoleon I Napoleon I, Emperor of France (1769–1821) CBD
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of France, who seeks to deliver a message which no British seaman can understand. Speculates that the reason why the spirit flounders in the Atlantic Ocean instead of coming to the English Channel to speak to his nephew, Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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, is because 'the laws of spiritualism do not allow that channel of communication'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 88.

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A Fault at any Rate

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Patronage, Commerce


    Notes the considerable inequality between the poor rate paid by the Bank of England Bank of England
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(£72) and that by the Apothecaries' Hall Worshipful Society of Apothecaries of London—Apothecaries' Hall
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(£231).



Punch,  34 (1858), 89.

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Oddities of the Electric Telegraph

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy, Language, Charlatanry


    Discusses one of the 'drollest mistakes' made by the electric telegraph—a misspelt name. Suggests that 'the wire which creates nicknames may coin new phrases, and the British vocabulary may be indefinitely augmented by the blunders of the Electric Telegraph'.



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Issue 869 (8 March 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 97.

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The Press on its Last Legs

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Engineering, Nutrition


    Believes that the amount of sugar and water 'which are daily swallowed in conjunction' at French cafes, 'would respectively suffice to freight and float the lately launched Britannic Ship, Leviathan SS Leviathan
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'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 99.

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Virgil v. Palmerston

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Discovery, Expertise, Politics


    Asserts that, like Virgil Virgil (Publius Vergilius Maro) (70–19 BC) CBD
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, Prime Mininster Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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has given 'a sketch of "Civis Romanus" [Roman citizen], according to [his] notion of the qualities implied in the word'. Reproduces what it claims is Palmerston's poem, which compares the achievements of Britain to those of France. The poem includes the lines 'Let us grant without scruple LEVERRIER Le Verrier, Urbain Jean Joseph (1811–77) DSB
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/ Out-telescopes ADAMS Adams, John Couch (1819–92) DSB
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by far. / What's the odds? The more planets the merrier, / And Neptune can't be a French star'.



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Issue 870 (13 March 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 103.

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The Anti-Street-Noise League

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Music, Crime, Mental Illness, Health, Medical Practitioners, Disease


    Reports Mr Punch's delight at news of a meeting to suppress street noise and his appointment of a committee to take evidence in support of that cause. The fictitious evidence includes that from Mrs Materfamilias, who links the near death of her child and her 'nervous fever' to Italian organists, and adds that her husband 'caught inflammation of the chest by going after a policeman one night, who refused to act'. Another witness, Dr Febrifuge, connects the 'protracted sufferings of many of his patients to their inability to procure repose' caused by howling at night.



Punch,  34 (1858), 107.

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A Railway that Pays

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Commerce, Accidents


    The writer is alarmed by the complaint made by Mr Vance Vance, Mr (fl. 1858) PU1/34/10/2
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at the half-yearly meeting of the Eastern Counties Railway Company Eastern Counties Railway Company
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concerning the extensive compensation payments it made to passengers injured on its lines. Noting the assurance of Horatio Low Low, Horatio (Chairman of the board of directors of the Eastern Counties Railway Company) (fl. 1858) PU1/34/10/2
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, chairman of the board of directors, that the matter was being given the 'most serious' attention, points out that the 'best method of saving fracture-money' would be to 'organize the arrangements of his dangerous railway rather better'. Adds that his thrift should 'consist in the reduction in casualties involving liabilities for funereal baked meats and similar matters, such as surgeons' fees, splints and bandages'. Thinks that Low should have silenced 'such indiscreet complaints' as those made by Vance if he wanted to run his firm without caring for passengers.



Punch,  34 (1858), 109.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Illustration, Caricature

Subjects:

Astronomy, Politics, Government


    Shows the sun, in which there appears the face of Edward H Stanley (Lord Stanley) Stanley, Edward Henry, 15th Earl of Derby (formerly styled 'Lord Stanley') (1826–93) ODNB
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, being eclipsed by the face of his father, Prime Minister Edward G G S Stanley (14th Earl of Derby) Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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, which is made to form part of the mountainous surface of the moon. This is a reference to Lord Stanley's appointment to the position of Colonial Secretary in his father's cabinet, and also to the imminent 'Great Solar Eclipse' of 15 March.



Punch,  34 (1858), 109.

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A Dangerous Remedy

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

War, Disease, Health


    Hopes, contrary to most people's desires, that a cure for seasickness will not be found, as this helps 'unman the ships of our adversaries'.



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Issue 871 (20 March 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 112.

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The Divinity of Rank

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Scientific Practitioners, Education, Expertise, Class, Religion


    Responding to a Univers Tribune Catholique, La (1832) Univers (Religiuex, Politique, Philosophique, Scientifique et Litteraire) (1833–60) Bibliotheque Nationale
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list of the number of aristocrats 'converted to Popery in England', questions the implication that aristocratic titles 'involve theological intuitions' and argues that if significant numbers of individuals from the various scientific, medical, and intellectual professions had converted this 'would have been somewhat more to the purpose'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 113.

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Specimen of a Select and Comprehensive Cyclopaedia of the Most Profound Knowledge, Compiled by Punch and Judy, for the Express use of Adults Only

Anon

Genre:

Fragment, Spoof

Subjects:

Mathematics, Ancient Authorities, Instruments, Mesmerism


    In defining 'A', observes that it 'denotes a universal affirmative proposition, such as Manchester and Meanness are synonyms', 'an unknown quantity' in algebra, and points out that 'Amongst the Romans A signified 5000, amongst the Greeks number 1, so absurdly vague were those puerile people of antiquity in their ideas'. Under 'ABACUS', observes that it was 'a table used by ancient mathematicians, covered with dust or sand on which they drew figures with their fingers' and 'an instrument for facilitating operations by means of counters, but so complicated that we prefer sending the reader down to Oxford or Regent Street' where shop windows demonstrate the principle. Adds that 'Abacus Pythagoricus is a table of numbers ready cast up to facilitate working in arithmetic', which has now been 'rigorously excluded from schools'. In defining 'ABADIR', notes that it was the 'name of the stone which SATURN swallowed under the absurd supposition that it was his own little boy JUPITER', an explanation which Punch belives only electro-biology can explain.



Punch,  34 (1858), 114.

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Attempted Sabbatarian Outrage

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Railways, Medical Practitioners


    Discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of a failed attempt by Sabbatarians to stop Sunday trains on a Scottish railway line. Notes that Sabbatarians have also failed to stop 'medical men and relatives to be procured on Sundays at the bed of sickness or death'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 114.

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The Two Voices

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Scientific Practitioners, Politics, Nationalism


    In an apparent reference to a new Anglo-French row, hopes that the 'learned zoologists' can 'find out the reason' why 'the [British] Lion hates Chanticleer's strain' [the crowing of the French Cock], and notes that 'it is a curious fact in zoology / That the growl of the Lion so works on the Cock, / That it sets his a crowing: and neither's apology / Addressed to the other, can soften the shock'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 122.

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An Engineering Difficulty

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Engineering, Military Technology


    Referring to the capture of two English engineers in Naples by King Ferdinand II Ferdinand II, King of the Two Sicilies (1810–59) CBD
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of the Two Sicilies, suggests blowing up 'that pig-headed potentate with a few "amiable words"' and then 'a little amiable gunpowder', which is unprecedented in solving 'engineering difficulties'.



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Issue 872 (27 March 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 124.

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Key to the Passport Mystery

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Disease, Cultural Geography, Travel, Politics


    A response to the decision by the French government to change its passport system so 'as practically to exclude the majority of British travellers from France'. Explains this move as a reaction to 'liberty-fever', a 'moral plague', which Englishmen communicate 'to most foreigners with whom they come in contact'. It is 'attended with a kind of mental exaltation in which the patient seems to talk and act rationally' but 'in the opinion of the state-doctors' suffers from a 'dangerous delirium'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 125.

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The Eclipse at Turnham Green (From our Special Reporter.)

Anon

Genre:

Diary, Spoof

Subjects:

Astronomy, Observation, Observatories, Animal Behaviour


    Illustrates the domestic and meteorological troubles which the author faced in his attempt to observe the solar eclipse of 15 March. Notes that by the time he had blackened a glass pane for observing the eclipse, clouds blocked the view, but later is convinced that an 'increasing greyness' is due to the eclipse. Attempts to identify the species of bird in his garden which sings in 'utter disregard of the Eclipse'—animal behaviour which contradicts his expectations. When the sky lightens, he discards his smoked-glass screen and walks out into the rain.



Punch,  34 (1858), 131.

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On the Singular Electrifying Qualities of Plaice, and the Cure of its Benumbing Effects

Mr Punch, M.A., F.R.S., F.L.S., F.R.S.L., &c., &c. Punch, Mr
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Genre:

Paper, Spoof

Subjects:

Natural History, Zoology, Animal Behaviour, Mental Illness, Physiology, Politics, Human Development


    A report on a paper presented to the 'Natural History Section' of the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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opens with a description of Alexander von Humboldt Humboldt, Alexander von (Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von) (1769–1859) DSB
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and John Hunter's Hunter, John (1728–93) DSB
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work on the Gymnotus electricus (electric eel), and a reminder that the 'unscientific' can see it at the Royal Polytechnic Institution Royal Polytechnic Institution
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. With his familiar juxtaposition of esoteric scientific terms and social commentary, Mr Punch presents his detailed researches supporting that claim that the 'power of producing torpidity' is exhibited by 'the second, or Subbrachial group of the Malacopterygii' which includes sole, founder, turbot, and plaice. Describes the effects on humans of eating these particular species of fish: sole seems to produce a shock and a tendency to escape from the room, while the common flounder affects the muscles and nerves of speech and accordingly ruins after-dinner speeches. More potent, however, is the plaice, which according to Mr Punch's experiments on the effects of the fish on the statesman Ralph Bernal Osborne Bernal Osborne, Ralph (1808?–82) ODNB
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, has the immediate effect of causing 'a visible indisposition to exertion'. Osborne's movements are 'evidently done [...] in a cataleptic state', and his 'faculties became benumbed', his 'promises and pledges' forgotten, and other characteristics lost. After fellow statesmen removed the plaice, Osborne was seen to regain his powers of 'vivacity, sting, and readiness', and is now so fully recovered that nobody would think he was once a 'dull, dead, silent, and apparently insensible man'. Mr Punch submits that the plaice must rank higher than the Gymnotus electricus for its electrical powers.



Punch,  34 (1858), 132.

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Did You Ever!

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Astronomy, Animal Behaviour


    Depicts a young boy, his aunt and sisters relaxing in a drawing room. The boy reads a newspaper report of the recent eclipse and its apparently 'extraordinary effect upon the inferior animals', and tells his aunt and the 'girls' that he would have 'have you and the girls look out for squalls'.



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Issue 873 (3 April 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 135.

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Reform and Omnibuses

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Transport, Technology, Progress, Government


    Laments the ongoing failure of the new omnibus to appear and compares the tardiness of omnibus reform to that of the Reform Bill.



Punch,  34 (1858), 139.

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''Twas Passing Strange!'

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Observation


    'The Eclipse, and the very little effect produced by it'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 141.

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Animal Observation Taken in London During the Eclipse

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Astronomy, Animal Behaviour, Amateurism, Observation, Instruments, Periodicals


    Noting the anticipated effects of the eclipse on animals, draws attention to the 'ample evidence' from correspondents in support of this claim (notably the cessation of bird song during the eclipse). However, seeks to remedy the fact that 'no mention had been made in any scientific journal of the ecliptical effects upon the London brute creation'. Offers a series of spoof reports from such individuals as 'an amateur astronomer' and 'a highly scientific gentleman', whose observations of the extraordinary behaviour of domestic animals appears to have only a tenuous connection with the eclipse. For example, Mr Spoone of Islington claimed that 'at half-past twelve o'clock one of his canary birds suddenly stopped singing, and continued silent for ten minutes. It is, however, doubtful if the observation can be considered of much value, inasmuch as MASTER SPOONE chanced to give the bird a lump of sugar at the time, and this might have occasioned the effect which was remarked'. The first letter of the article, 'O', is a woodcut in the shape of an eclipsed sun, which in the adjacent illustration is being observed through a tabletop telescope by a crouching figure. A clown looks through the other end of the instrument.



Punch,  34 (1858), 141.

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A Pleasant Prospect

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Climatology, Prognostication, Cultural Geography, Politics


    Notes the prediction by William Parsons (3rd Earl of Rosse) Parsons, William, 3rd Earl of Rosse (1800–67) DSB
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of a very hot summer. Claims that the astronomer 'must have founded his prophesy on the meteorology of Ireland', where the 'mildness of the season is proved by the visible sprouting of the orange plant in the Castle Dublin Castle
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conservatories in Dublin', following the recent appointment of Archibald W Montgomerie (13th Earl of Eglinton) Montgomerie, Archibald William, 13th Earl of Eglington and 1st Earl of Winton (1812–61) ODNB
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as Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. Eglington, who had previously served in this office, was noted for his fairness and liberality.



Punch,  34 (1858), 142.

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No Justice for Widowers!

Nicholas Nicholas
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Physiology, Natural Law, Government


    Protests that the new bill for legalising marriage with a deceased wife's sister is a physiological rather than a theological question. Insisting that 'what is physiologically right is theologically right also', the writer argues that Parliament Houses of Parliament
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should be a 'theological assembly' and 'ought to legislate on the foundation of natural laws', but claims that he will warmly oppose natural laws and other 'mandates' coming from this authority.



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Issue 874 (10 April 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 143.

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Optical Phenomena Observed During the Eclipse

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Light, Instruments, Observation, Amateurism


    Describes one of the 'Optical Phenomena attending the Eclipse'—the discovery of several hundred black eyes caused by the 'injudicious' use of smoked-glass plates to observe the celestial event. Recounts the experience of Mr Swipey, who sought to carry out George B Airy's Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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suggestion that 'elevated' persons should 'remark the changes of appearance of surrounding objects': he became 'elevated' (drunk) and noted that the eclipse made all objects 'look double'. Following Airy's suggestion to gauge the sun's luminosity using a candle, 'a gentleman at Peckham' singed off part of his right eyebrow, which can be seen 'without the aid of any instrument'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 144.

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Feast on the First Instant

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Quackery, Patronage


    Notes that patrons of homeopathy dined together on All Fools' Day.



Punch,  34 (1858), 145.

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Alarming Solar Phenomenon

Copernicus Hazy, F.R.A.S., F.R.G.S., &c., &c., &c. Hazy, Copernicus (FRAS, FRGS, &c., &c., &c.)
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Astronomy, Observation, Photography, Amateurism, Comparative Philology


    Informs Mr Punch of his interest in the letters of George B Airy Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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, John R Hind Hind, John Russell (1823–95) DSB
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, and the secretary of the Photographic Society of London Photographic Society of London
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(William Crookes Crookes, Sir William (1832–1919) DSB ODNB
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) on the solar eclipse. Noting his favourable geographical location for observing the event, presents his observations bearing upon the outbreak of spots on the sun's face. Using his 'travelling DOLLOND Dollond, John (1706–61) DSB
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' placed in his coach-house, he projected an image of the sun onto paper and then a collodion plate. Reports that shortly after the contact of the solar and lunar images, he 'saw a dark object stealing over' the sun's upper rim, a monstrous animal which, as the illustration of the collodion plate shows, was evidently a spider on the telescope lens. Reckons that this casts into shade other solar phenomena, including 'red flames, crowns of glory, dark projections from the rim of the moon's shadow, BAILEY's Baily, Francis (1774–1844) DSB
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beads'. Convinced by the genuineness and importance of his observation, speculates that it might give 'foundation' to 'the wild Norse legend of the dragon that is one day to devour the Sun and Moon'. Finally, he noticed a spider hanging from the end of his telescope and, identifying himself as a disappointed 'student of nature', crushes the insect.



Punch,  34 (1858), 145.

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Political Natural History

Anon

Genre:

Dialogue, Spoof

Subjects:

Natural History, Zoology, Politics


    Dialogue between a 'Clever Child' and a 'Savage Father' who explains that the difference between a Tory and a Conservative is the same as that between 'a Crocodile and an Alligator'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 146.

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Internal Vaccination

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Vaccination, Medical Treatment, Nutrition

Institutions mentioned:

Royal College of Physicians Royal College of Physicians
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    Discusses a report in the Bristol Times Bristol Times (1839–53) Felix Farley's Bristol Journal (1853–64) Daily Bristol Times and Mirror (1865–83) Bristol Times and Mirror (1883–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of a remedy for preventing smallpox scars that involves bathing the marks in tripe-liquor. Struck by the fact that tripe is derived from the same quadruped from which smallpox vaccinations are produced, suggests that the 'internal use' of tripe might also stop smallpox. Recommends that anybody 'apprehensive of catching small-pox' should try this experiment.



Punch,  34 (1858), 149.

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The Indian Puzzle

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Organic Chemistry, Politics, Language, Government


    Compares and contrasts the government's India Bill with organic chemistry. On the one hand, the bill is like organic chemistry, in that 'it is a complicated matter', although the jumble of matter in organic compounds can be disentangled while that in the bill cannot. On the other hand, the bill is unlike organic chemistry, because the former is 'the work of a Ministry of simple Conservatives', while the latter is 'a product of the Chemistry of the Compound Radicals'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 161.

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Life and Limb Valuation for Railways

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Railways, Accidents, Commerce


    Following a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, discusses the fact that the amount of compensation payments paid out by railway companies in the event of an accident is proportional to the pecuniary circumstances of the victim. Suggests that this makes railway companies protect the rich rather than the poor traveller, but urges that the payment should be 'no respecter of persons'. Goes on to suggest that 'mutilations ought to be rated in some measure according to the marketable value of the member or the feature spoiled'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 151.

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Popular Astronomy

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Superstition, Observation


    Discusses the confusion of one of its rural correspondents over the use of 'limbs' in descriptions of the sun and moon. While accepting that the sun and moon have 'eyes, nose, and mouth', as shown on pub signs, he thinks those who assert that the celestial bodies have limbs 'have not [...] a leg to stand on'.



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Issue 875 (17 April 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 153–54.

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The Domestic Opera

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Quackery, Human Development


    Features a song by a family doctor, who examines a child's tongue, and thinks the 'world is but a gilded Pill, / The breeze of fame a sweetened draught'. He adds that when the pills fail you, 'You'll know what hollow spells you've quaffed', and urges the child to call on him whenever 'darkest visions near thee blend'. (154)



Punch,  34 (1858), 162.

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Lord Rosse's Prediction of Excessive Political Heat

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Prognostication, Superstition, Meteorology, Politics, Astronomy, Instruments, Government, Observation


    Discusses rumours spreading around the various clubs that William Parsons (3rd Earl of Rosse) Parsons, William, 3rd Earl of Rosse (1800–67) DSB
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has predicted that the approaching parliamentary session 'would be about one of the hottest ever known' (a reference to Rosse's prediction of a hot season). In contradiction to these rumours, the writer presents a communication allegedly from Rosse, who denies the truth of the statement imputed to him and claims, 'by the testimony of his Telescope, which enables him to look into the middle of several weeks to come, that the session of 1858 will be about one of the mildest known for years'.



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Issue 876 (24 April 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 163.

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Political Advice Gratis

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Disease, Politics, Government, Quackery, Reading


    Offers the Prime Minister, Edward G G S Stanley (14th Earl of Derby) Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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, some political advice which is given as if Punch were a political physician administering medicine to the English constitution. Advises Derby to change his principles by taking 'a course of alternative medicine', notably 'some strong purgatives to drive out by degrees all his party prejudices'. Thinks his political demise can be averted by several means, including swallowing 'a Reform pill without waiting till next session', because 'Unless taken quite in time, a tonic will prove useless'. Goes on to advise the 'weak' premier to take a 'good strong dose of Punch', which contains no 'quackism' and is 'In all political diseases [...] the only sure corrective'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 164.

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A New Idea for the Aldermen

Mycophagus Mycophagus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Botany, Natural History, Nutrition, Government

People mentioned:

Joseph Banks Banks, Sir Joseph (1743–1820) DSB ODNB
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    Responding to an article in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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describing the discovery of a gigantic fungus in a Doncaster tunnel, suggests that the plant is probably 'good to eat'. Noting the incredible growth rate, appearance, and strength of the fungus, and other edible fungi, recommends this specimen to the Lord Mayor of London, Robert W Carden Carden, Sir Robert Walter, 1st Baronet (1801–88) ODNB
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, for consumption at a civic feast. Suggests trying the fungi on pigs before alderman, lest the latter grow 'excrescences' from their noses as a result.



Punch,  34 (1858), 165.

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The Zoological Nemesis of Faith

Zoologist Zoologist
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Reading, Menageries, Representation, Zoological Gardens, Animal Behaviour, Heroism, Faith

People mentioned:

David W Mitchell Mitchell, David William (1813–59) WBI
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    Identifying himself as 'an elderly man', the narrator describes his childhood pursuits in natural history, including his reading of William Bingley's Bingley, William (1774–1823) ODNB
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Anecdotes Bingley, William 1803. Animal Biography; or, Authentic Anecdotes of the Lives, Manners, and Economy, of the Animal Creation, Arranged According to the System of Linnaeus, 3 vols, London: Richard Phillips
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and Oliver Goldsmith's Goldsmith, Oliver (1728?–74) ODNB
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Animated Nature Goldsmith, Oliver 1774. An History of the Earth, and Animated Nature, London: J. Norse
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, his memories of the lions in the Tower of London Tower of London
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, and of Edward Cross's Cross, Edward (1774?–1854) ODNB
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Exeter Exchange Royal Menagerie Exeter Exchange—Royal Menagerie
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, where he saw wild animals, including Chuny the elephant, the 'massacre' of which caused him 'bitter [...] suffering'. He relates how Cross's collection was moved to new premises at King's Mews, Charing Cross Cross's Menagerie, King's Mews, Charing Cross
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, and how, with the latter location giving way to the National Gallery National Gallery
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, Cross's animals were replaced by 'wonderful works of art'. Having joined the Zoological Society Zoological Society of London
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and being a frequenter of the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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, he found the latter institution inferior to Cross's menagerie. Agrees that the animals are better kept, but stresses that his 'faith in the animals is shaken'. His reverence for elephants as the 'best and wisest of brutes' has evidently been undermined by novelist Charles Reade's Reade, Charles (1814–84) ODNB
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unfavourable portrait in Reade 1858 Reade, Charles 1858. Cream: Contains Jack of All Trades, a Matter of Fact Romance, and The Autobiography of a Thief, London: Trübner & Co.
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, his reverence for the camel has been shattered by the criticisms of William H Russell Russell, Sir William Howard (1820–1907) ODNB
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in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, and his faith in the lion had been ruined by the accounts of Roualeyn G G Cumming Cumming, Roualeyn George Gordon- (1820–66) ODNB
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and David Livingstone Livingstone, David (1813–73) ODNB
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. Finally, he notes his loss of faith in the hyena and complains that his zoological beliefs 'are turned topsy-turvy'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 170.

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The Patent Ear Protector and Anti Organ Nuisance

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Invention, Technology, Sound, Music, Health


    Describes an invention for protecting the ear against 'the intolerable irritation and distraction occasioned by the Italian organ-grinders'. This consists of a u-shaped piece of wood to which is attached two adjustable screws that fit inside the ear. Suggests likely customers for this invention and an alternative strategy against the street musicians—a noisy dog whose howl overpowers the music.



Punch,  34 (1858), 170.

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Shall the Hudson Have a Statue?

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Commerce, Heroism, Charlatanry, Steam-power

People mentioned:

George Hudson, Hudson, George (1800–71) ODNB
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James Watt Watt, James (1736–1819) DSB
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Punch,  34 (1858), 172.

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[Horse Training by the Rarey Method]

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Amusement, Education, Animal Development


    Shows a old horseman gesturing towards his horse who obediently brings him his hat. The caption reads: 'Old Mr. B. found out that the oil of Rhodium system is all nonsense, and has been initiated by Mr Rarey. Whenever he gets split, and loses his hat [...], he just says to his horse, "Fetch it, Old Boy!" and the thing is done!'. This is a reference to John S Rarey's Rarey, John Solomon (1828–66) WBI
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system of taming horses.



Punch,  34 (1858), 172.

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The Latest Turn of Science

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Manufactories, Invention, Amusement, Aesthetics, Gender, Patronage, Domestic Economy


    Discusses an American invention of a 'mechanical curl-paper' which allows for the production of systematically arranged hair ringlets, and which Punch regards as 'a great improvement'. Wishes to see a patent taken out for an invention that 'would enable ladies to put their bonnets on in less than five minutes', an invention that Punch expects every husband would purchase.



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Issue 877 (1 May 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 176.

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Italian Persecution (A Scene from Real Life)

Anon

Genre:

Drama, Drollery; Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Health, Mental Illness, Sound, Music, Instruments


    The illustration shows a sickbed on which lies a boy suffering from a nervous fever induced by the noise of an organ-grinder.



Punch,  34 (1858), 179.

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The Service and the Reward

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Hospitals, Disease


Punch,  34 (1858), 181.

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Ragged Playgrounds

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Health, Human Development, Education


    Discussing the benefits of ragged playgrounds, as opposed to ragged schools, argues that 'wholesome recreation' provided by such places is a 'vital necessity' for those bodies with 'immature and not yet ripened intellects'. Moreover, such playgrounds will enable the body to grow properly. Adds that 'wholesome play' has a beneficial effect on 'young morals', and so 'calls the judgement into play, while developing the muscles'.



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Issue 878 (8 May 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 185.

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The Battle of the Gunboats

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Military Technology, Controversy, Commerce


    Discusses a recent controversy in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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over the methods of launching gunboats: in particular, whether they should be kept afloat or hauled up on slips. Laments the idea of public money being used to finance these slipways.



Punch,  34 (1858), 185.

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Diviners and Dupes

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Mesmerism, Animal Magnetism, Crime, Quackery, Commerce


    Responding to an advertisement in a Birmingham paper from a female 'Clairvoyante' and 'Herbalist', asks whether clairvoyants can see through walls in houses of correction where they have been imprisoned. Goes on to discuss the experiences of a 'professor of Somnambulism', Adolphe Didier Didier, Adolphe (fl. 1856–71) WBI
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, who offers his 'oracular consultations' to the fashionable readers of the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, and who claimed to have predicted the Derby winner during a mesmeric trance. Given that he was forced to publish a book on animal magnetism (Didier 1856 Didier, Adolphe 1856. Animal Magnetism and Somnambulism, London: T. C. Newby
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), Punch suspects that such powers benefit all but the 'owner'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 190.

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A Hint to the Horsetamers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Education, Animal Development, Cruelty


    Discusses the chances of John S Rarey's Rarey, John Solomon (1828–66) WBI
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system being used to tame a hippopotamus, as well as 'stablemen and horsebreakers [...] the very lowest order of the brute creation'. Since Rarey's system works on the affections, the author wonders whether it will succeed with these brutes who have no affections (judging by the cruel manner in which they treat horses). Advises John V S Townshend (Viscount Raynham) Townshend, John Villiers Stuart, 5th Marquess Townshend (formerly styled 'Viscount Raynham') (1831–1925) Cokayne 1910-59
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and the 'Cruelty-Preventers' to take up the matter, and, if this proves too slow, recommends the formation of an 'Equestrian Humane Society' for the 'abolition of horse torture'. Concludes by asking Rarey to 'try his hand at groom-taming'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 190.

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Clause for a Medical Bill

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Quackery


    'No Quack shall be entitled to bring an action for libel against anybody for denouncing him'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 192.

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Hard to Bear

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour


Punch,  34 (1858), 192.

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A Pair of Them

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Heroism

People mentioned:

Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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Issue 879 (15 May 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 195.

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The Brute Tamer (An Old Song in a New Shape)

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Animal Development, Education, Mesmerism, Cruelty


    Discusses his use of John S Rarey's Rarey, John Solomon (1828–66) WBI
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method of taming horses. Opens by describing how he prevented a groom from using brute force to tame a horse, instead inviting him to use Rarey's method. A crowd gathers which supports the narrator's rejection of the cruel methods of the groom, but cannot understand Rarey's system. The crowd is then convinced by the narrator's demonstration of Rarey's system, the narrator denying that the effect was connected with 'Electro-biology / Not any magic or mystery'. Finally, the author manages to convince the groom to use Rarey's method of 'Persuasion's gentle force'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 196.

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Just Like 'em

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Animal Development, Education, Gender


    Shows a young woman crying because her husband will not tell her the 'taming secret'—a reference to John S Rarey's Rarey, John Solomon (1828–66) WBI
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method of horse-taming.



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Issue 880 (22 May 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 203.

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Mr Punch to the Honourable Thomas Duncombe M.P.

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Vaccination, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Heroism, Discovery, Politics, Disease


    Challenges Thomas S Duncombe's Duncombe, Thomas Slingsby (1796–1861) ODNB
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view that the new statue of Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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in Trafalgar Square is out of place among 'naval and military heroes', and that 'everybody' is disgusted by it. Deciding that Duncombe's remarks are not meant in jest but prompted by 'ignorance', explains why Jenner deserves a statue. Mr Punch's argument stresses how Jenner's 'discovery' has dramatically reduced cases of smallpox throughout Europe. (203) Supposing that Duncombe wishes to honour destroyers rather than preservers of the human race, suggests removing the Jenner statue to the Thames Tunnel Thames Tunnel
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and putting 'Crimean generals and Chelsea commissioners' and the disreputable politician William Cox Cox, William (1817–89) Stenton 1976
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on Trafalgar Square pedestals. Concludes by stressing that Jenner 'devoted his life to labour for the good of his kind'. (203–04)



Punch,  34 (1858), 205.

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A Case for Mr Rarey

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Politics


    Describes the 'ungovernable' behaviour of the government 'Indian Elephant'. This is an allusion to Edward Law (1st Earl Ellenborough) Law, Edward, 1st Earl of Ellenborough (1790–1871) ODNB
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, president of the East India Company East India Company
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Board of Control and former governor-general of India, who was often called 'Elephantborough' by Punch. The reference is to Ellenborough's attack on the current governor-general of India, Charles J Canning (1st Viscount Canning) Canning, Charles John, Viscount Canning of Kilbrahan, governor-general and first viceroy of India (1812–62) ODNB
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, for delivering a proclamation confiscating lands in the Oudh province of India, which threatened to precipitate another rebellion. Punch thinks this behaviour could have been controlled with the taming skills of John S Rarey Rarey, John Solomon (1828–66) WBI
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.



Punch,  34 (1858), 211.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Vaccination, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Heroism


    Reports on Thomas S Duncombe's Duncombe, Thomas Slingsby (1796–1861) ODNB
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objection to the statue of Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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in Trafalgar Square and reminds 'the veteran dandy TOM' of the 'myriads and myriads of lives' saved by 'the discovery of vaccination'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 212.

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A New Pleasure for Entomologists

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Entomology, Disease, Steamships

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Entomological Society of London Entomological Society of London
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    Discusses a report in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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of the discovery of the 'auger-worm' disease on board the royal steamship, HMS Barracouta HMS Barracouta
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.



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Issue 881 (29 May 1858)Expand    Contract

No Articles Indexed

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Issue 882 (5 June 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 226.

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[An Adept in the Art of Horse-Taming]

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct. [2]

Illustrators:

J L, pseud.  [John Leech] Leech, John (1817–64) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Animal Development, Education


    The first illustration shows a portly gentleman, Mr Briggs, and other figures standing before a young horse in a stable. The caption explains that Briggs, 'having become an adept in the art of horse-taming, operates upon a colt he has bred himself, and which has never been broken,—'. The sentence continues 'With complete success' under the second illustration, which shows Mr Briggs standing proudly on the colt which now lies on the stable floor.



Punch,  34 (1858), 231.

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A Medical Sentimentalist

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners


    Discusses a Lancet Lancet (1823–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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advertisement from a medical practitioner who wishes to be introduced 'to the Daughter of a Medical Man, with a view to Marriage and Partnership'. While praising the heart of the advertiser, surmises that the 'boundless love [...] embraces the whole profession, as he in whose glowing breast it palpitates, seems prepared to fold in his arms the child of any member of that profession, and join her papa in practice'. Claiming to be able to 'divine' the character of the doctor from his advertisement, argues that he enjoys moonlight walks, poetry, tender music, and that he gets upset over his 'young and beautiful' consumptive patients.



Punch,  34 (1858), 231.

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Lying in Numbers

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Health, Disease, Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners


    Suggests a verse for quacks who advertise. The author of the poem opens by affirming his generally good state of health, but then describes how he had been afflicted by gout in the limbs, coughs in the chest, and 'dropsy and dyspepsia dire'. Concludes by explaining how doctors and surgeons failed to remedy his symptoms but that 'Professor GAMMON's pills' 'banished every pain'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 231.

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Of Course

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Vaccination, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Heroism

People mentioned:

Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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Issue 883 (12 June 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 233–34.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Commerce, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Government, Politics, Pollution, Public Health, Sanitation


    Noting the second reading of William F Cowper's Cowper, William Francis, 1st Baron Mount-Temple (1811–88) ODNB
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medical bill, Punch 'intends to move a clause empowering a Magistrate to order any Advertising Quack to be flogged, and branded with a Q', the only solution to 'the murderous system' of 'heartless traders'. Proceeding to report on the introduction of a poisons bill by Edward G G S Stanley (14th Earl of Derby) Stanley, Edward George Geoffrey Smith, 14th Earl of Derby (1799–1869) ODNB
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, complains that two million Londoners live over a 'far worse poison'—the Thames. Urges that the river should be cleansed, a sewage system installed, and chemists' shops attacked. (233)



Punch,  34 (1858), 234–35.

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The Pet of the Provinces

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Medical Treatment, Surgery


    Identifying him as the 'State Quack', this poem describes Benjamin Disraeli's Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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trumpeting of his political victories to his countrymen. Some of his boasts about his political powers are couched in medical terms: for example, he promises the country that 'we've medicines in store which will serve you far more than any that others could send you', including 'Tory-Whig mixtures, from Peelite prescriptions they're made up', 'Conservative Pills, that will cure all your ills', and 'the best antidotes for too liberal votes, which might bring on a low Radical fever'. Also boasts that he can perform a 'tax-amputation' and that he has a pill which will be called '"Poor Man's Friend", which will keep up his strength without eating'. (235)



Punch,  34 (1858), 235.

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A Fine Gentleman

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Expertise, Charlatanry, Class


    Discusses the question of the gentlemanly status of Mr Watkins Williams Williams, Watkins (fl. 1858) PU1/34/23/3
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who, in a legal trial, denied being a qualified medical practitioner yet had styled himself a doctor but not a member of the Royal College of Surgeons Royal College of Surgeons
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. Notes that counsel denied that the accused was a gentleman because a gentleman 'was one who had no occupation or calling'. Observes that on this basis vagabonds and quacks would qualify as gentlemen.



Punch,  34 (1858), 235.

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The Doctors and Their Bills

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Government, Politics, Homeopathy, Disease, Health


    Laments the number of medical bills brought before Parliament Houses of Parliament
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and blames this on dissent among doctors. Discussing ways of generating unanimity, suggests that a homeopathic bill 'might do more good than a larger one such as would please the general practitioner' and be acceptable to the Royal College of Physicians Royal College of Physicians
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. Also suggests that 'the best Medical Bill would be 'one founded on the Chinese practice—"to pay the Doctor so long as you were well, and stop the payment the moment you fell ill"'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 240.

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Aërial Drainage

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Disease, Public Health, Taxonomy, Medical Practitioners, Cultural Geography, Engineering, Language, Sanitation


    Discusses a proposal to channel sewer gases from the sewers through large columns on the streets and into the air above people's heads. Goes on to discuss the French origin and etymology of diphtheria, noting the 'slight mistake' that French physicians made in 'christening their little nosological stranger'. Focussing on the removal of the disease, suggests conveying noxious gases from sewers via 'elegant and graceful columns' or lampposts.



Punch,  34 (1858), 241.

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Our Bread Upon the Waters

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary,

Subjects:

Nutrition, Chemistry


    Discusses a report in the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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concerning an 'impending moral and physical revolution about to result from Chemistry'—the possibility, enunciated in a recent lecture by Edward Frankland Frankland, Sir Edward (1825–99) DSB DNODNBB
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, of producing foods from their constituents. Boasts that Mr Punch had anticipated Frankland's claim in an article on 'Vegetable Mutton' in Punch's Pocket Book for 1855 Punch's Pocket Book (1842–80) Waterloo Directory
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. Here, Mr Punch noted that although a galvanized mixture of water, charcoal, hydrogen, nitrogen, and oxygen cannot produce food, 'the discovery of some agent yet more subtle than electricity may one of these days' enable the production of venison from 'air, water, and cinders'. Noting the Morning Post's claim that coal could be used to make bread, surmises that all food and other 'creature comforts' may be produced from coal.



Punch,  34 (1858), 241.

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The Medical Wisdom of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Government, Politics, Quackery, Homeopathy, Expertise


    Discuses a petition sent to the House of Commons House of Commons
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for bringing Albert I Coffin's Coffin, Albert Isaiah (c. 1790/1–1866) ODNB
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'medico-botanical system' within medical legislation. Questions the ability of Parliament Houses of Parliament
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to judge the credibility of Coffin's system and suggests that if it does consider it, then it should also consider the medical systems of Christian F S Hahnemann Hahnemann, Christian Friedrich Samuel (1755–1843) DSB
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, James Morison Morison, James (1770–1840) ODNB
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, and advertising quacks. Points out that 'all parliament can do in legislating upon medicine' is to ensure that only those who have satisfied 'competent' medical experts of their skill should be allowed to practice.



Punch,  34 (1858), 242.

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Sawney and Sambo

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Race, Comparative Anatomy, Human Species, Controversy


    Discusses a meeting of the Ethnological Society Ethnological Society of London
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where a Mr Craufurd (John Crawfurd) Crawfurd, John (1783–1868) ODNB
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criticised Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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for confusing the skull of an African with that of 'a Scotch sargeant', a mistake showing the fallacy of distinguishing races of men by their skulls. Punch thinks the skull of the Scottish sergeant came to be confused in this way because it 'had probably been marked as the Skull of Blackie', a pun on the common Scottish surname.



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Issue 884 (19 June 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 244.

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Shipbuilding Extraordinary

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Spoof

Subjects:

Steamships, Engineering

Institutions mentioned:

SS Leviathan SS Leviathan
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    Discusses news that New York shipbuilders are constructing 'a ship so tremendously long, that there is no part of the ocean sufficiently broad to enable it to turn'. Adds that the latter problem has been solved by having wheels at its American and English ends which will mean that passengers will simply be able to walk between the two countries. Notes that the ship will also boast cabstands, an omnibus, and shops.



Punch,  34 (1858), 245.

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A Fine Stamp on Sulphur

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Medical Treatment, Race


    Noting that sulphur cures a cutaneous affliction on the homeopathic principle that like cures like, suggests that the 'Lazzaroni of Naples' have been saved from this disease owing to the immense quantities of sulphur produced by the recent eruption of Mount Vesuvius.



Punch,  34 (1858), 249.

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A Go at the Gunboats

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Commerce, Government


    Following a report in the Hampshire Telegraph Hampshire Telegraph (1802–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, attacks the government for wasting money on a useless scheme for preserving gunboats by hauling them high above water and then launching them when needed. Laments the slowness of the launching operation and thinks that the Admiralty Admiralty
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deserves a 'good coal hauling'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 251.

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Accident to a Government Train

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Railways, Accidents, Government, Politics, Engineering


    Report of a railway accident at Slough, the site of a famous banquet at which Benjamin Disraeli Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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described the political controversy sparked by the warning of the president of the East India Company East India Company
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Board of Control, Edward Law (1st Earl Ellenborough) Law, Edward, 1st Earl of Ellenborough (1790–1871) ODNB
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, to the governor-general of India, Charles J Canning (1st Viscount Canning) Canning, Charles John, Viscount Canning of Kilbrahan, governor-general and first viceroy of India (1812–62) ODNB
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, that his proclamation confiscating lands in the Oudh province of India threatened to stir up another rebellion. In this report, 'BENDIZZY' (Disraeli) is portrayed as a engine driver whose hasty control of the 'Parliamentary train' called 'Reasoning' caused the accident. The report plays on the similarity between the terms used to describe a railway accident and those used to describe a politician whose train of argument has 'got off the line of truth'. For example, it notes that the 'train [...] was started without notice of the signal "Caution", and was not sufficiently ballasted with facts', and 'just before the break-down, BENDIZZY was "rather going it", and some expressed a hint that he would burst his boiler'. Criticises the zealous and shortsighted 'driving' style of Bendizzy, pointing out that 'this hap-hazard style of driving may be all very well for reckless Opposition work; but it clearly will not do for a Government train, which of course must be kept going at the regular pace'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 251.

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The Mute and the Medical Interest

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Quackery


    Reports on a parliamentary petition from the 'Undertakers of the United Kingdom' that quacks be allowed unlimited rights to practice under the terms of any medical bill.



Punch,  34 (1858), 252.

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A Hint to France

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Physiology, Surgery, Death, Lecturing


    Discusses the lectures of Charles-E Brown-Séquard Brown-Séquard, Charles-Édouard (1817–94) DSB
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at the Royal College of Surgeons Royal College of Surgeons
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, in which the lecturer identified a point in the brain which, when lightly touched, 'produces instant death'. Notes that the medical term for the structure translates as 'the point as the writer's pen'.



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Issue 885 (26 June 1858)Expand    Contract

Punch,  34 (1858), 253.

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Precaution Better than Guns

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Vaccination, Medical Practitioners, War, Heroism


    Noting the decision by Emperor Napoleon III Napoleon III, Emperor of France (originally Louis Napoléon (Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte)) (1808–73) CBD
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to re-vaccinate his whole army, hopes Thomas S Duncombe Duncombe, Thomas Slingsby (1796–1861) ODNB
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, the notorious opponent of the Trafalgar Square statue of Edward Jenner Jenner, Edward (1749–1823) DSB
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, will 'consider that this accounts for the virus displayed by the French army against this country'.



Punch,  34 (1858), 254–55.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Public Health, Sanitation, Government


    Reports on measures taken and to be taken to purify the Thames.



Punch,  34 (1858), 256.

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Puff and Counterpuff

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Pharmaceuticals


    Discusses advertisements from Thomas Holloway Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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and Julien Larue du Barry Larue du Barry, Julien (fl. 1843) WBI
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, who claimed to have made themselves ill taking each other's medical substances, but then recovered on taking their own.



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