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Punch, Or the London Charivari [1st]  Introduction
Volume 47  (July to December 1864)

Punch,  47 (1864), [v]–[viii].

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Introduction

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Quackery, Imposture


    Summarises a forthcoming article (Anon, 'The Quack in the Pillory', Punch, 47 (1864), 248) on a quack doctor who 'overstepped the boundary of the law, and attempted to extort money from one of the fools who had confided in him' (viii).



Issue 1199 (2 July 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 1–2.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Religious Authority, Progress, Commerce


    Notes the rejection of a bill 'for making all the Irish railways run Sunday trains', a decision informed by economic rather than religious interests (2).



Punch,  47 (1864), 2.

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Ingenuity Thrown Away

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Invention, Domestic Economy, War


    Announces news that 'a machine for washing dishes has lately been patented in America', although doubts the use of the instrument, given the rising cost of food caused by the American Civil War and the corresponding dwindling need for dishes.



Punch,  47 (1864), 3.

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Croquêt  [1/7]

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Amusement, Exploration, Discovery, Astronomy, Mechanics, Gravity, Scientific Practitioners


    Pondering 'the immediate cause [...,] the design, and [...] the guiding laws' of croquet, notes that while a knowledge of cricket and its origins is something 'every one can get by heart', the situation with croquet is very different: 'let the curious start / With book and plan to trace its wandering course / Like SPEKE Speke, John Hanning (1827–64) ODNB
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and GRANT Grant, James Augustus (1827–92) ODNB
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the Nile, up to its source, / Its streams run back until you end the chace'. Adds that 'Some think when NEWTON Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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viewed the planets roll, / A thought of Croquêt glanced athwart his soul: / In Jupiter the Blue, in Mars the Red, / He saw, while Croquè'd comets madly sped. / If so I wish the Master of the Mint / Had taken Thyme to put his thought in print'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 7.

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Punch's Notes and Queries: A Shameless Piracy Upon Our Honoured and Inestimable Friend N. and Q.

Anon

Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Supernaturalism, Spiritualism, Animal Behaviour, Superstition, Gender


    Written in the style of Notes and Queries Notes and Queries (1849–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, this article includes spoof letters from 'Spirit-Rapper' enquiring about a note in a copy of Lytton 1842 Lytton, Edward Earle George Lytton Bulwer 1842. Zanoni, 3 vols, London: Saunders and Otley
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, and Dominie Sampson, who wants to know whether women express a superstitious animosity towards spiders, which would explain his wife's habit of clearing away the webs of that 'industrious and indefatigable animal'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 9.

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What do you Want? or, The Householder's Constant Companion

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Domestic Economy, Statistics, Periodicals, Exploration


Punch,  47 (1864), 10.

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The American Question

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Crime, Steam-power, Technology, Exhibitions, Mechanics, Cultural Geography


    Discusses an extract from an article in the Albany Evening Journal Albany Evening Journal (1830–1900+) RLIN
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which describes the punishment meted out to a deserter from the Yankee army. Draws attention to the Yankees' preference for the 'rack' and thinks the 'Federal Steam-Rack may be expected to figure in any considerable contribution which Yankeedoodledom may make to any future International Exhibition', the Yankees adapting 'steam, as a motive force, to all varieties of the more complicated machinery of torture'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 10.

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How to do Pepper's Pepper, John Henry (1821–1900) ODNB
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Ghost

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Supernaturalism, Technology, Invention, Exhibitions


    'Use the Ghost and don't pay PEPPER'.



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Issue 1200 (9 July 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 11–12.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Military Technology, Politics, Government


    Notes the debate on the 'Education of Naval Architects', the vote in favour of a substantial fund for the Department of Science and Art Department of Science and Art
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, and an attack on the South Kensington Museum South Kensington Museum
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(12).



Punch,  47 (1864), 12.

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National Defensive Economy

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Commerce


    Praises Edward M Palliser's Palliser, Edward Matthew (fl. 1860) WBI
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new form of ordnance, a 'chilled shot [...] made by being cast in a mould of cold iron', which can penetrate 'the side of an iron-clad', and which costs 'only 2s a-piece' compared with £1 10s for steel shot.



Punch,  47 (1864), 17.

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Punch's Table of Precedence

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Table, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Scientific Practitioners, Engineers, Meteorology, Quackery, Class, Reading, Status


    Noting that 'changes in society' have 'rendered the old Tables of Precedence, to be found in the Peerage, &c., obsolete', presents Punch's new table of precedence which reflects the periodical's attitude towards certain individuals and professions, notably its support for the monarchy and Punch readers, and its hostility to boring preachers and crinoline wearers. The list of 'precedence among men' places Mr Punch third, Joseph Paxton Paxton, Sir Joseph (1803–65) ODNB
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eighth, the 'Medical Profession but no advertisers, quacks or other scum', eleventh, and 'Admiral Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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, while Clerk of the Weather', twenty-sixth. The list of 'precedence among women' places Florence Nightingale Nightingale, Florence (1820–1910) ODNB
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fourth.



Punch,  47 (1864), 18.

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A Trifle too Smart

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Music, Environmentalism, Scientific Practitioners

People mentioned:

Charles Babbage Babbage, Charles (1792–1871) DSB
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Punch,  47 (1864), 19.

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Twelve Thoughts for Those Tempted to Travel

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Education, Human Development, Museums, Comparative Philology, Geology, Engineering, Display


    Presents Mr Punch's reasons 'Why it is so much better' to stay in London during the holiday season. These include 'You can have your children home from school for the Michaelmas holidays, and even an extra week, during which you can examine them carefully as to their progress, and take them to the British Museum British Museum
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, and that of Practical Geology Museum of Practical Geology, Jermyn Street
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, also to the Thames Tunnel Thames Tunnel
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'.



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Issue 1201 (16 July 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 23.

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False Fine Eyes

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Amusement, Disease, Mental Illness, Gender


    Discusses a Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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advertisement for 'Bella-Donna', a lotion for producing 'a brilliant Eye'. Warns that the lotion is made from 'Deadly Nightshade' and will 'cause paralysis of the iris' which, because it has been artificially opened by the lotion, will be exposed to too much light. Goes on to warn that 'The use of Belladonna by stupidity to give itself the appearance of animation is likely, therefore, to result in the addition of ocular blindness to the mental', and denying that the lotion produces a genuine gaze, urges fathers and brothers to dispose of any such lotion found in their houses.



Punch,  47 (1864), 28.

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The Latest News from Washington

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Sanitation, Geology, Discovery, Domestic Economy, Commerce


    Discusses news of the discovery of a 'soap-mine' in California, warning that it is not a safe investment on the grounds that 'the earth hath bubbles', of which there are many in Britain.



Punch,  47 (1864), 28.

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Spirit-Moving Trade Intelligence

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Commerce, Political Economy, Nutrition, Manufactories


    Noting the dramatic changes in the prices of 'precious metals and provisions', suggests that such 'rising and oscillating movement on the part of gold must clearly have been caused by spiritual agency', and that this was behind the 'rise in bread prices'. Wishes the spirits would 'effect a rise in bread just at the right moment in the manufacture', but laments that 'unluckily the spirits never condescend to stoop to any sort of useful work'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 29.

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A Jolly Puff for Jolly Nose

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Palaeontology, Astronomy


    Suggests an adaptation of a scene from Green Bushes Buckstone, John Baldwin 1845. The Green Bushes; or, A Hundred Years Ago, a Drama, in Three Acts, London: National Acting Drama Office
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, which features a heated exchange between the comic partnership of Paul J Bedford Bedford, Paul John (1794?–1871) ODNB
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and John L Toole Toole, John Lawrence (1830–1906) ODNB
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. Replying to Bedford's claim that his education was deficient, Toole accuses Bedford of being an 'antibilious old pterodactyl', and later confuses 'meteor' for 'métier'.



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Issue 1202 (23 July 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 31–32.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Museums, Comparative Philology, Zoology, Display, Politics, Government


    Reports the parliamentary debate on the British Museum British Museum
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, in which Spencer H Walpole Walpole, Spencer Horatio (1806–98) ODNB
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observed that the public would not be able to see various new acquisitions 'until those beasts and birds shall be taken away'. Adds: 'While we can see four beautiful giraffes and two hippopotamuses alive, it is too absurd to fling lovely Greek marbles into a cellar, to leave room for that dusty splitting old straddler of a camelopard, and the wooden-looking river-horse at the Museum'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 33.

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Early Birds

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Human Development, Health, Disease, Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners


    Discusses the rules devised by the Early Rising Association Early Rising Association
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, which imposes fines on people for being late. Puzzled by the fourth rule which states that 'No excuse for being late will be taken except illness, in which case no fines need be paid'. Ponders how serious the illness has to be before the sufferer can escape the fine, and 'who is to certify the illness'. Wonders whether the association has its 'own doctors for verification'. (33)



Punch,  47 (1864), 38–39.

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Our Dramatic Correspondent

One Who Pays One Who Pays
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Genre:

Regular Feature, Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Amusement, Music, Disease, Mental Illness, Cultural Geography, Gender


    Begins by noting the representation of somnambulism and insanity on the 'operatic stage', alluding to 'Amina' who 'walks in her sleep', and 'Lucia' who 'goes mad'—references to protagonists of Vincenzo Bellini's Bellini, Vincenzo (1801–35) CBD
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opera La Somnambula, and Gaetano Donizetti's Donizetti, Gaetano (1797–1848) CBD
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opera Lucia di Lammermoor respectively. Proceeds to describe other operas in which the heroine dies of consumption (a possible reference to Giuseppe F F Verdi's Verdi, Giuseppe Fortunino Francesco (1813–1901) CBD
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La Traviata), or is 'smitten by a sun-stroke, and dies after seeing visions, which she vocally describes'. Suggests that ague might be the next subject for 'operatic treatment', drawing attention to the fact that the 'French vibrato style of singing' would be appropriate since it 'fosters quite an agueish vibration of the voice'. Complains that there is enough sickness in the world to make it a suitable subject for an opera, and wishes that the operatic character who falls victim to sunstroke would take the precaution of using a parasol. (38)



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Issue 1203 (30 July 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 41.

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A Fact—Notice with a Vengance

[Symbol], pseud.  [Arthur R Fairfield] Fairfield, Arthur R (fl. 1875) WBI
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Symbol], pseud.  [Arthur R Fairfield] Fairfield, Arthur R (fl. 1875) WBI
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Education, Human Development, Zoology, Gender


    Shows a mother and her two daughters sitting before a model of Noah's ark and its animals. One of the sisters holds a baby girl on her knee and the mother holds a model of a hippopotamus before the infant. The mother remarks that her baby is 'beginning to know all the beasts in the ark by name, too', but when she asks the baby the identity of the model she holds in her hand, the baby replies 'Mam-ma'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 41.

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Lofty Speculations

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Commerce, Patronage, Medical Treatment, Imposture, Medical Practitioners, Class


    Presents short announcements by joint-stock companies which may be patronised by aristocrats and other 'People who have more money than they know what to do with'. These include 'The Medical Attendance Company (Limited)' which seeks to acquire the 'practice of the Principal Physicians and Surgeons of London' and supply medicine to the 'British Public'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 41.

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The Coming Comet

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Prognostication, Politics, Crime, Manufactories, Human Development, Music, Environmentalism, Internationalism, War, Observatories


    Song sung to the air of 'There's a Good Time Coming Boys', this opens by describing the imminent appearance of a comet, whose day of arrival has not yet been ascertained by John R Hind Hind, John Russell (1823–95) DSB
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, and which is expected to be 'stronger' and 'longer' than the 'last Comet' (the great comet of 1858). Proceeds to describe some of the dramatic social and political changes that might take place when the comet is finally seen. These include 'Workhouses shall ope their doors, / None shall die of honger, / Organmen shall quite our shores', 'poor needlewomen may / For fair work receive fair pay', 'To the [American Civil] war an end there'll be, / When Americans shall see / The Comet Coming' and 'Universal Peace there'll be'. Concludes by anticipating the amount of dust created if the comet should strike 'the Earth's upper crust', and wonders whether Hind and Charles G Talmage Talmage, Charles George (fl. 1886) WBI
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, who also works in George Bishop's Bishop, George (1785–1861) ODNB
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South Villa Observatory South Villa Observatory, Regent's Park
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, are in fact mistaken.



Punch,  47 (1864), 42–43.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Metrology, Politics, Government, Commerce


    Notes that Sir F Smith (possibly a reference to Francis P Smith Smith, Sir Francis Pettit (1808–74) ODNB
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) raised in the House of Commons House of Commons
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the 'rather important question' of 'whether the British fleet Royal Navy
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is properly armed', to which the Admiralty Admiralty
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declared that it was 'minding its own business'. Later notes discussion in the House of Lords House of Lords
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of a bill to introduce the metric system. Notes the remark of George D Campbell (8th Duke of Argyll) Campbell, George Douglas, 8th Duke of Argyll (1823–1900) ODNB
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that the system has the support of 'all the Chambers of Commerce', and the backing of Henry P Brougham (1st Baron Brougham and Vaux) Brougham, Henry Peter, 1st Baron Brougham and Vaux (1778–1868) ODNB
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. (42)



Punch,  47 (1864), 43.

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Beautiful Stars

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Observation, Amusement


    Gives advice on observing two 'star' actresses. Treating them as if they were celestial bodies, the author notes that they are 'both evening stars' of the 'first magnitude', but that they will be 'setting in a very few more nights'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 47.

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Traps to Catch Fools

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment, Adulteration, Charlatanry, Imposture, Commerce, Periodicals, Reading


    Describes some of the lessons that can be learned from quack doctors about the 'art of getting money', notably the fact that a 'penny-worth' of worthless substances and a 'five-shilling advertisement, is a failure if it only produce five or six sovereigns'. Describes how such a principle can be adopted in other forms of trade, including how an 'unscrupulous printer' can circulate a book which contains a mixture of such unsavoury ingredients as 'mendacity' and 'indecency' and yet count on sales to 'lunatics'. Concludes by lamenting the 'utter failure' of the 'Medical Act' which was designed to protect the public, and presents Dr Punch's warnings to his 'credulous friends' who might be duped by the 'jack-puddings [buffoons] of 1864, whether the latter advertise themselves as "registered" or "non-registered practitioners", or resort to newspapers of apparent respectability'. Notes that the 'very best tonic for nervousness can be obtained in Fleet Street, every Wednesday, for three-pence'—i.e. Punch.



Punch,  47 (1864), 50.

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'Who's Griffith?'. An Ode In Commemoration of a Grand Parliamentary Feat

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Vaccination, Aeronautics, Accidents, Mathematics, Expertise


    Responding to news of the statesmen, Christopher D Griffith Griffith, Christopher Darby (fl. 1864) PU1/47/5/7 Stenton 1976
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, who was 'Twice Counted Out' or defeated in Parliament Houses of Parliament
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, stresses that 'a thing twice done has brought a Briton glory' and considers other infamous events that happened twice. For example, 'Twice men have had small-pox, spite vaccination [...] Twice have risked life in mad aërostation'. Acclaims Griffith's feat above them all, apostrophising 'Counting BABBAGE Babbage, Charles (1792–1871) DSB
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' and 'BIDDER Bidder, George Parker (1806–78) ODNB
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, Calculating Boy', on the subject.



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Issue 1204 (6 August 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 51.

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'Home, Sweet Home'

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Health, Human Development, Climatology, Animal Behaviour


    Shows a male figure bathing up to his neck in a lake. He looks nervously over to a hippopotamus that is bathing nearby. The caption insists that 'Acclimatisation is all very well in its way—but it is no joke, on rising to the surface, after taking a header, to find a lively hippopotamus as your companion of the bath'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 52–53.

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Punch's Essence of Parliament

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Proceedings, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Medical Practitioners, Imperialism, Sanitation, Engineering, Politics, Government, Accidents, Transport


    Notes the royal assent given to 'several tons of Railway Bills' and the rejection of a bill for 'sending out raw and half-taught medical officers to India' (52). Later notes a new act for 'making Advances for Public Works in the Manufacturing Districts', and reminds readers of the benefits of being away from London during the construction of John Thwaites's Thwaites, Sir John (1815–1870) ODNB
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'Sewer barricades' and other public works. Also notes the 'Act for making it easier to make Railways', which Punch thinks 'will make them cheaper to make' but warns that unless directors improve the communication facilities between passengers and guards, then accidents will happen and 'it is to be hoped that juries will give thundering damages'. (53)



Punch,  47 (1864), 53.

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Contagion on the Rail

Anon

Genre:

Reportage

Subjects:

Railways, Travel, Disease


    Notes the new peril of railway travel—catching small-pox.



Punch,  47 (1864), 54.

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The Army-Surgeon Famine. An Intercepted Letter

George George
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Surgery, Education, Charlatanry, War, Amateurism, Professionalization, Class, Commerce


    This spoof letter is headed 'To EARL DE GREY AND RIPON', apparently a conflation of the names of former Secretary of State for War, Henry G Grey (3rd Earl Grey) Grey, Henry George, 3rd Earl Grey (formerly styled 'Viscount Howick') (1802–94) ODNB
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, and current Secretary of State for War, George F S Robinson (1st Marquess of Ripon) Robinson, George Frederick Samuel, 1st Marquess of Ripon, 2nd Earl of Ripon and 2nd Earl de Grey (1827–1909) ODNB
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; the salutation is 'MY DEAR DE GREY', and the letter is signed 'George', and addressed from 'Horse Guards Army—Commander-in-Chief's Office (Horse Guards)
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'. It urges that 'Something must be done to provide the Army Army
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with competent Surgeons', noting that the terms and payment offered by the army are not good enough for 'men of education'. Draws attention to the problems of raising army surgeons' pay and recognising their 'social standing', notably the fact that other officers regard them as 'intermediate between gentlemen and tailors'. Suggests that a solution to the problem is to revise the standard of qualification needed to become an army surgeon, in the belief that army surgery requires no more skill than that possessed by a butcher or cabinet-maker, and should not depend on proficiency in Latin. Similarly, noting the disagreements between doctors, thinks 'what they call medical science is all humbug' and believes that 'any druggist's apprentice' could undertake the duties of an army medical officer. Questions why an army medical officer should be catechised 'in botany and chemistry and philosophy' and insists that he be examined 'in his own business'. Concludes by pointing out that if 'illiterate snobs' are accepted as army surgeons, they will be 'satisfied with moderate pay' and will not want to associate with 'officers and gentlemen'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 59.

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Medical Query

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Mental Illness, Neurology


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Issue 1205 (13 August 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 61.

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Note by a Stump-Orator

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Language


Punch,  47 (1864), 63.

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New Railway Signals. (From the Code Godsonian)

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Instructions, Spoof

Subjects:

Railways, Transport, Time, Charlatanry


    Introduces 'a set of entirely New Rules and Regulations drawn up for the future guidance of officials connected with the New Railway Line' which will be called the 'N.S.E.W. Colwell Hatchney Railway' (a reference to the lunatic asylum in Colney Hatch Colney Hatch Asylum
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). The rules illustrate the incompetence and confusion associated with a railway company: for example, the 'General Signals' include 'Blowing a Nose' and 'Playing the Trombone', and the rules stipulate that such signals 'may mean anything, everything, nothing, or something'. The rules for 'Time' and the 'Duties of Signalman' are equally worrying. For example, they stipulate that 'The Company intend to run Trains just whenever they like, without reference to any stated times', and that 'The Signalman may wave the Red Flag, whenever he feels elated or excited'. The rules for 'Guards' are somewhat more reassuring. For example, the guard should 'carry all the Acts of Parliament affecting Railways' and that he 'must know the current number of Bradshaw's Railway Guide Bradshaw's Monthly Railway Guide (1841–1900+) ODNB, s.v. Bradshaw, George
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by heart'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 64.

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The Old, Old Story (Respectfully Dedicated to Small German Princes in General)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Comparative Philology, Animal Behaviour, Politics, Military Technology, War, Internationalism


    Describes the fable of a cat and monkey, whose 'moral's seen in action in all ages, ranks and climes'. The cat is an allegorical representation of Prussia and/or Otto E L von Bismarck (Count of Bismarck-Schönhausen) Bismarck, Prince Otto Edward Leopold von, Duke of Lauenburg (1815–98) CBD
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, while the monkey represents 'the smaller powers'. The poem describes how the cat and the monkey lived together but that, one day, the cat 'closed her soft fur round' the monkey who was a generally well-behaved and peaceful animal that 'kept out of the way of edge-tools, gun-powder, fire'. The cat and monkey then craved for 'Duchy chestnuts' (a reference to the Danish duchies of Schleswig-Holstein over which Prussia and Austria were fighting Denmark), but after roasting the chestnuts the cat used the monkey's paw to 'extract the dainties from the fire's hungry maw', an act that caused extreme pain to the monkey but which enabled the cat to enjoy the food. The moral of the poem is that the cat (Prussia) is the 'artful one', while the monkey (smaller powers) is 'the tool eximious'.



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Issue 1206 (20 August 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 71.

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[Sick Leave for the Federal Malingerer]

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Disease, War, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Commerce


    Shows an American military officer (a 'Federal Malingerer') and an English officer in the bar of a New York hotel. Much to the English officer's consternation, the American officer complains of having gastric fever and states that he expects to contract small-pox. He proceeds to explain: 'I go to a civilian doctor, and tell him I want a month's sick leave—and I just give him twenty dollars, so he certifies I'm sick, and goes to an army doctor who certifies it-is-so. I git my leave, and the two doctors trouser the dollars between 'em'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 73.

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Professional Love Song. The Medical Assistant

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Taxonomy, Education, Instruments


    Written from the perspective of a medical assistant whose duties include minding 'the Surgery bell' and rolling 'the frequent pills', proceeds to describe his beloved as 'a banker's only child' who is the 'beauty of the shire'. He notes how his 'counter-irritant, the [surgery] boy' observes his reaction to Bella when 'she goes riding by', and how his medical surgery is disrupted by the recollection of Bella: for example 'the merest glimpse of Bella's nose nosology upsets'. Goes on to describe his ambition to be educated at Guy's Hospital Guy's Hospital
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and to 'live on pulse' until he is the 'boast of my market natal town', but then feels palpitations which 'no stethescope can tell'. The palpitations are evidently caused by his knowledge of the fact that Bella is to be married to a General J, an event that dissipates his hopes of 'sitting by the Surgery fire' and of giving Bella 'the sweet emulsion of a kiss'. Concludes by lamenting the fact that there is no medical treatment for his condition.



Punch,  47 (1864), 78–79.

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A Chat About the Netley Monument

Anon

Genre:

Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Medical Practitioners, Heroism, War, Surgery, Class

Institutions mentioned:

Army Army
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    Set in a 'First Class Carriage', this is a conversation between a 'Swell' and a 'Surgeon' on the monument erected at Netley to commemorate the 'fifty-four medical officers who fell in the Crimea'. They break into conversation when the surgeon extracts a piece of cinder from eye of the swell, an act which prompts the swell to urge the need for every train to carry a surgeon and to praise the Netley monument. The surgeon warns, however, that the monument will not encourage more 'fellows' to enter the army, and goes on to explain that army surgeons require better pay, better treatment, and 'Fraternity and equality' with fellow officers. The swell reminds the surgeon that 'combatant officers' would not accept these terms, while the surgeon insists that 'a fellow who may have to take up an artery in a shower of bullets' is as much a 'combatant officer' as a 'General who as often as not directs strategic operations at a safe distance' from the field of battle. The swell and the surgeon agree that the army still regards surgeons as snobs (i.e. people of inferior social rank), and the surgeon explains that this has prompted the army to advertise for 'Acting Assistant Surgeons'. Replying to the swell's suggestion that the army should explicitly advertise for 'Snobs for Surgeons', the surgeon warns that applicants will be snobs rather than educated men. (78) The surgeon concludes that either 'Surgeons in the Army must have their claims conceded, or the Army will have to do without Surgeons', a problem which the swell thinks will be solved by placing the 'medical profession on a level with the military' and raising a 'distinguished Surgeon' to the peerage (79).



Punch,  47 (1864), 79.

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Nostrum and Vestrum; or, Mutual Attestation

Prof. Holloway U Holloway, Prof
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Barry Du Barry & Co. U Barry Du Barry & Co.
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Disease, Quackery, Patronage


    Consists of a spoof correspondence between Prof. Holloway (an allusion to Thomas Holloway Holloway, Thomas (1800–83) ODNB
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) and Barry Du Barry & Co. Holloway upholds the efficacy of the 'DELICIOUS HEALTH-RESTORING REVELENTA ARABICA FOOD' sold by Barry Du Barry & Co., a substance that Holloway claims will treat a bewildering range of medical complaints, from indigestion and constipation to hydrophobia and delirium tremens. Holloway supports his claim by appealing to the fact that he successfully tried the remedy on the late Mason G Stratford (5th Earl of Aldborough) Stratford, Mason Gerard, 5th Earl of Aldborough (1784–1849) Cokayne 1910-59
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, the notorious supporter of homeopathy. The firm of Barry Du Barry & Co. reciprocate by upholding the efficacy of 'HOLLOWAY'S PILLS AND OINTMENT' as cures for an equally bewildering number of illnesses. They explain that the pills and ointment 'act harmoniously in preserving the pure and best materials of the body, and in expelling all that is redundant, effete, or corrupt, restoring the British constitution by a process precluding any occasion for the ballot and extension of the suffrage'. They support their views by citing three cases out of '60,000 cures' allegedly effected by Holloway's treatment.



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Issue 1207 (27 August 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 82.

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Quiet Watering Places. No. I—Winklebeach  [1/9]Anon, 'Quiet Watering Places. No. II—Gwrysthlogwdd (Continued)', Punch, 47 (1864), 134–35
Anon, 'Quiet Watering Places. No. II—Gwrysthlogwdd (Continued)', Punch, 47 (1864), 156

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Diary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Telegraphy, Progress


    Describes the geographical and cultural remoteness of 'Winklebeach', an 'out-of-the-way spot', which the 'Railway has not yet reached' and where 'a message by telegraph is unknown'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 83.

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How to Know When Parliament is Up

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Railways, Accidents, Engineering, Progress, Charlatanry, Observation, Commerce


    Reports that a railway engine on the 'new portion of the Great Southern and Northern Railway' fell into a street in Clerkenwell after a railway bridge collapsed. Parodying the grave tone adopted in serious reports of railway accidents, the report begins by hailing with 'not an unreasonable pleasure' 'every extension' of 'our Railway System', but stresses the 'drawbacks which, though they cannot be regarded as blemishes upon a noble invention, are not unfrequently productive of serious mischief'. Proceeds to describe the 'boon' which the 'auxiliary branch of the Great Southern and Northern Railway' has proved to the local area, but regards the accident to be an 'exception' to the 'rule' that the railway has not caused any casualties. Noting the uncertainty over the precise time of the accident, the author describes the 'extraordinary excitement' caused by the incident and points out that the only casualties were 'a large number of herrings and apples' belonging to a costermonger. Notes the sympathy expressed for the costermonger and the uncertainty as to the 'proximate cause of the accident', but points out that several local inhabitants did not think the bridge looked strong enough 'to bear the weight that constantly passed over it'. Concludes by adding more information concerning the identity of the train: according to a crossing-sweeper, its name began with an '"F", probably the Fly or the Phantom'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 84.

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Chemin de Fer et De L'Enfer

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Technology, Religious Authority, Religion


    Announcing the opening of the Northern Spanish Railway Northern Spanish Railway
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by 'a person denominated King of Spain' (i.e. King-Consort Francisco D A Bórbon y Bórbon Bórbon y Bórbon, Francisco de Asís María Fernando, King-Consort of Isabel II, Queen of Spain (1822–1902) WBI RLIN
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), describes the close connections between the railway and Catholicism. For example, 'No end of priests' blessed the engines, 'The boilers are to contain nothing but holy water', and 'A first-class carriage is to be fitted up as a confessional in case of accidents'. Ponders the fact that while one end of the line is in 'devout Madrid', the other is in 'Voltairean Voltaire, François Marie Arouet de (1694–1778) DSB
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Paris'. Asks: 'Which way will flow the stronger current of thought?'



Punch,  47 (1864), 88.

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Dannle George on the Drought

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Prognostication, Astrology, Charlatanry


    Written to represent a Scottish speaker, opens by pondering the reasons for 'This here long drought' and why 'the larned can't explaain' it. Turning to the weather prophets of the day, asks Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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'How long 'twool last' and whether 'Zadkiel' (Richard J Morrison Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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) can 'voretell' the 'weather by the stars' as he does for 'Plags, earthquaaks, vamuns, wars'. Resolves that in future he will not rely on Zadkiel or Francis Moore Moore, Francis (1657–1714?) ODNB
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and that while the 'Earth cracks wi' thurst' he will quench his with 'a quart o' beer'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 89.

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Zoological Recreation

Homo Homo
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Evolution, Human Development, Instinct, Human Species, Animal Development


    Begins by insisting that the 'interest excited by the late swimming matches' revives the 'controversy about Man's place in nature', which he thinks may be answered by Richard Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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and Thomas H Huxley Huxley, Thomas Henry (1825–95) DSB
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(whose Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature Huxley, Thomas Henry 1863. Evidence as to Man's Place in Nature, London: Williams and Norgate
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greatly fuelled the controversy). Noting that animals can be distinguished from man by 'deficiencies' as well as 'endowments' and 'instinct by want of reason', the author argues that if, unlike man, 'quadrupeds swim naturally', then this is an 'essential difference between Simia and Homo'. He urges that this can be tested by plunging 'the orang-outang into the hippopotamus's tank' at the Zoological Society Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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. In a postscript, he admits being hasty in assuming that no humans can swim, and wonders if babies can perform this task.



Punch,  47 (1864), 89.

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The Anti-Railway Assault and Robbery Guarantee Company

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Railways, Crime


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Issue 1208 (3 September 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 99.

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Heavy Charge

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Military Technology, Experiment, War, Steamships, Commerce


    Ponders the results of the trials of William G Armstrong's Armstrong, Sir William George, Baron Armstrong of Cragside (1810–1900) ODNB
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'monster gun' at Shoeburyness. Stresses that all there is to show for the expenditure of 'forty pounds' per shot is a 'Hole in a shield, the model fence / Of Ironsides [...] Save proof that if, with skilful aim, / The gun were levelled true, / And Ironsides invading came, / 'Twould riddle her sides too'. Acknowledges the need to fight 'Imaginary foes' to prepare for war, but notes how much further 'the money goes' when the foe is a real enemy. Draws attention to the waste of money caused by inaccurately aiming the gun during firing practice, and concludes that 'the bolt, so pitched aright' will cause much damage to 'foreign Ironsides'. Concludes by maintaining support for 'dog-cheap' ordnance instead of 'firing off the sum / Of forty pounds in vain'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 100.

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A Word to the Westry

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Adulteration, Imposture, Government, Politics


    Discusses news that 'Upwards of two hundred doctors' have supported Arthur H Hassall Hassall, Arthur Hill (1817–94) ODNB
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as a candidate for the 'New Medical Officer' in Marylebone, a judgement that has 'enraged that awful body the Marylebone Vestry Marylebone Vestry
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'. Reports that the vestry has denounced the 'Medical Profession for its interference' but cannot understand this reaction as Marylebone is not known for unscrupulous tradesmen whose adulterating activities would be exposed by Hassall. Concludes that 'it still looks fishy to see Trade banded against Hassall, and for the sake of the "good taste" of which these swell parochials are so justly proud'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 101.

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Amends to Leicester

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Aeronautics, Language

People mentioned:

Henry T Coxwell Coxwell, Henry (Tracey) (1819–1900) ODNB
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Punch,  47 (1864), 101.

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Our Own Review

Anon

Genre:

Review, Spoof

Subjects:

Music, Environmentalism

People mentioned:

Charles Babbage Babbage, Charles (1792–1871) DSB
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Punch,  47 (1864), 101.

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The New Bream Down Harbour

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Animal Behaviour


    Ponders the identity and swimming behaviour of 'the new bream' and calls on Francis T Buckland Buckland, Francis Trevelyan (1826–80) ODNB
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to supply the 'icthyological information' when he 'goes out of mourning for the lamented sturgeon'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 102.

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A Brutal Democracy

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Degeneration, War, Politics, Government, Cultural Geography


    Insists that 'now the belligerent Yankees have sunk to the level of savage beasts', the existence of an 'Animal Republic' can be added to that of the 'Animal Kingdom'.



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Issue 1209 (10 September 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 104–05.

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From Our Ill-Used Contributor

Epicurus Rotundus Rotundus, Epicurus
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Genre:

Regular Feature, Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Astronomy, Aeronautics, Engineering, Animal Development, Death, Museums


    Addressed to Mr Punch, this letter opens by noting a few details concerning 'the Starry GALILEO Galilei, Galileo (1564–1642) DSB
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' including his vital dates and the fact that he preceded the writer in 'remarking that the world still moves'. Proceeds to describe the writer's (usually miserable) experiences of remaining in London during the very hot holiday season. Later notes his failure to 'go and see the balloon start from the Crystal Palace Crystal Palace
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', but recalls an earlier ascent that he made with Charles Green Green, Charles (1785–1870) ODNB
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from Cremorne Gardens Cremorne Gardens
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. Also notes the progress of the Thames Embankment Thames Embankment
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and the frequent fall of a horse and cart into this river. He points out that 'Sometimes horse and cart are dragged out [...] but at other times I incline to believe that the animal being drowned, is interred in the Embankment, and laid away for a few centuries, at the end of which his bones will be dug out, and set up in the British Museum at Kensington South Kensington Museum
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, in evidence that the English of the Victorian age buried horses with funeral rites' and are therefore not as Christian as documents suggest. (104)



Punch,  47 (1864), 110.

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The Refining Effects of the Metric System in the Colliery Districts

[Symbol], pseud.  [Arthur R Fairfield] Fairfield, Arthur R (fl. 1875) WBI
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Symbol], pseud.  [Arthur R Fairfield] Fairfield, Arthur R (fl. 1875) WBI
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Metrology, Education, Language, Class, Industry, Cultural Geography


    Shows two miners whose faces are covered with soot, and who talk to a gentleman sitting on a horse. One of the miners gives directions to the equestrian figure, informing him in strong Yorkshire dialect and with reference to the metric system, how to reach an undisclosed destination. Punch plays on the fact that apart from the references to 'centimetres', 'Dekametres', 'Hekometre', and 'Dakare', the metric system has not refined the speech of those from the colliery districts. For example, the miner explains, 'Wuny oop 'igh Park Colliery, a'll toorn to roight 'boot centimetre oop rooad, then goa on straight rooad 'boot Dekametre'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 112.

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Music and Medicine

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Music, Medical Treatment, Language


    Noting the 'Grand Choral Festival' of the Tonic Sol-Fa Association Tonic Sol-Fa Association
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, insists that 'Tonic Sol-Fa' seems 'an infinitely more agreeable tonic than quinine'.



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Issue 1210 (17 September 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 113.

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Railway Suttee

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Accidents, Technology, Gender


    Addressed to 'Railway Directors', this article discusses a letter in the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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containing an 'alarming account of a fire in a railway carriage, caused by a lump of burning coke which entered it from the engine'. Describes how the burning coke ignited the furnishings of the carriage and how one passenger attempted to control the blaze with his paletôt, the carriage not being supplied with water. Punch urges railway directors to 'provide all your trains with a water supply' for extinguishing carriage fires, a move that will protect the carriage furnishings but also the lady occupants wearing 'inflammable fabrics'. Explains how a 'hose, running, the whole length of the train', connected to a 'properly constructed reservoir', would enable 'any gentleman at a moment's notice to constitute himself fireman to a lady on fire'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 115.

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Snobs and Surgeons in the Army

Armiger Armiger
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, War, Class, Medical Treatment


    The writer begins by asking Punch not to blame 'the Swells' for the 'Surgeon-Famine in the Army Army
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' and identifies himself as a swell whose family has 'always lived sumptuously on the labour of others' and who entered the army in order to become something more than a swell. Upholds the claim that the surgeon is the most gentlemanly of all 'in a Regiment', not least because of his education, and explains other officers' indignation towards army surgeons on the grounds that the former regret not having 'rank and birth'. Accordingly notes the low breeding of most army officers, many of whom are sons of 'a large mercantile rogue, or a swindling railway jobber'. Being 'purse-proud' snobs they assert their position by 'insisting on the abasement of Army Surgeons'. Reasons that it is the 'Snobs' rather than the swells who are 'insolent to the Surgeon', and defends the need to regard surgeons as much as combatant officers as others. Threatens to resign his commission if the 'reasonable demands of the Army Surgeons' are not granted, and upholds the need for effective surgery in the army.



Punch,  47 (1864), 115.

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Hippophagy Again

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Zoology, Cultural Geography, Cruelty


    Discusses a lecture given by one of the secretaries of the French Society for the Protection of Animals Société Protectrice des Animaux
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in which the speaker defended the eating of horseflesh.



Punch,  47 (1864), 116.

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Scurvy Rogues

A Respectable Man Respectable Man, A
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Crime, Medical Treatment, Adulteration, Government


    Noting the apparent link between the reduced frequency of garotting and the 'assignment of flogging to those crimes', suggests that the same punishment should be used for those who supply adulterated lime-juice to the Royal Navy Royal Navy
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. Notes that in a letter to The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, Henry Leach Leach, Henry (1836–79) ODNB
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, the 'resident medical officer to the Dreadnought Dreadnought, ship
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hospital-ship', explains how lime-juice supplied to the navy is made from 'tartaric and other acid'. The author regards this adulterated substance as 'good-for-nothing rubbish' and the act of producing and supplying it 'a heartless fraud'. While he tolerates the lenient punishments given for 'ordinary acts of cheating and swindling', believes the manufacture of 'sham lime juice', which allows 'multitudes' to 'rot and die' of a 'dreadful disease', should be punished by whipping. Concludes by contemplating with abhorrence the prospect of flogging the 'chief proprietor of those extensive works, a sleek, smooth, gentleman in a suit of black', and suggests that neither Mr Punch nor anybody else could tolerate this eventuality. He adds that he could not stand this, as his 'hatred of a rascal is less intense than his veneration for a person whose deportment and exterior are those of a respectable man'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 120.

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Lusus Naturae

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Husbandry, Monstrosities, Zoology


    Shows a 'Excursion Tourist' and a 'Facetious Rustic' looking into the distance where they observe a tree behind which stands an animal that looks like it comprises two rear ends of horse joined together (it is merely two horses standing face to face, but with their front ends obscured by the tree). The tourist thinks he sees an 'Extra'or'nary cre'char', while the rustic boasts that the animal was bred on 'this 'ere wery fa-arm'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 120.

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After-Dinner Papers

Thomas Buzz, Junior Buzz, Thomas, Junior
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof; Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Observation, Periodicals, Amateurism


    Written to represent an author of limited literary abilities, this presents the author's 'long count of the weather of Last Month' that was dictated to him from 'your Scitific Crospondent [...] after dinner'. The notes are somewhat confused and chaotic: for example, 'Cumuli and cirrhi gave themselves up to the full development of ozone; while Summer Meteoric Phosphorescent Trains met the Radiating Streamers within five minutes of each other'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 120.

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Startling Cruelty

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Hospitals, Light, Surgery, Medical Treatment


    Discusses the cost of furnishing, repairing, and redecorating the Ophthalmic Hospital Royal London Ophthalmic Hospital
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and puzzles over the apparently tragic-sounding cost for 'Rods for the Blind'.



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Issue 1211 (24 September 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 124–25.

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From Our Ill-Used Contributor

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Instruments, Display, Commerce, Heat, Astronomy, Meteorology, Microscopy, Government


    The letter-writer describes his 'delightful and instructive walk' on the south side of the Strand, a journey that brings him into direct sunlight and which prompts him to hope that 'Posterity will twist the Strand a little, and amend this fault, unless the Sun himself shall correct it by some alteration of the precession of the equinoxes' or 'other astronomical reform'. He goes on to describe some scientific instruments in a window of an undisclosed shop, including a 'thermometer that tells you how cold it will be on Christmas Eve next', a 'telescope, very cheap, that will enable you to hear the doves cooing in the planet Venus', and a microscope that reveals the coarseness of the skin. Later, he comes across a 'picture-shop' whose windows display a photograph of a 'great photographic chemist', and a 'watch-face high up below a window', a instrument apparently 'put there to test the power of certain Government telescopes'. (124)



Punch,  47 (1864), 125.

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Railway Difficulties

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery; Dialogue, Spoof

Subjects:

Railways, Transport


    Describes some of the uncomfortable aspects of a railway journey 'on the Cruxregis Line' from 'the Metropolitan Terminus' to Capfield.



Punch,  47 (1864), 125.

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Nasal Education

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Narcotics, Philosophy, Psychology, Education, Mathematics, Natural Theology


    Discusses the claim that 'snuff is a great stimulant to thinking', which has been supported by Alexander von Humboldt Humboldt, Alexander von (Friedrich Wilhelm Heinrich Alexander von) (1769–1859) DSB
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who has asserted that snuff 'refreshes the memory'. Unable to summon any evidence to refute this claim, and noting the ability of some people who are able to remember an incident by recollecting a 'scent with which it is associated', suggests that the nose be used as a 'mnemonical assistant'. Presents examples of how this might be effected including sniffing Eau de Cologne to recollect a 'tough problem of Euclid Euclid (fl. 295 BC) DSB
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' or whiffing peppermint to stamp on the memory 'an argument of William Paley Paley, William (1743–1805) DSB
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'. Concludes by pointing out that the outcome of competitive examinations would be won by 'the man who had not merely the most nous, but the most nose'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 126.

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Letter from Mr Boswell Boswell, James (1740–95) ODNB
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James Boswell Boswell, James
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Engineering


    Discusses the unsafe and incommodious state of Blackfriars Bridge Blackfriars Bridge
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, which is now being demolished, and points out that his 'friend', Samuel Johnson Johnson, Samuel (1709–84) ODNB
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, 'was dissatisfied with the plan on which the [present] bridge was constructed' although his designs for the bridge were not adopted. Adds that 'little more than a century has vindicated the great philosopher's wisdom' and suggests that the new bridge be called Samuel Johnson in recognition of his character and profound good sense.



Punch,  47 (1864), 129.

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A Visit to Mynheer van Dunk

Vagabundus Vagbundus
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Engineering, Genius, Railways, Cultural Geography


    Describes a visit to Schevening in Holland and praises a tramway at the Hague, a construction that prompted the writer to claim 'that the Dutchman hath a genius for mechanical invention even hath the go-ahead American or Briton', and identifies the railway as one of 'purely Dutch construction'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 131.

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Putting Britannia on Her Metal. Letter from the Poet Laureate of the Fleet

Tomas Little Little, Tomas
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof; Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Military Technology, Technology, Progress, Steam-power, Engineering

Institutions mentioned:

Royal Navy Royal Navy
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    Written as if by an old naval captain of limited literary ability, this describes his visit to his niece's wedding during which he sings a song featuring the lines 'Arts of Oke are our ships'. This causes great amusement to the husband of his niece who told the writer that he was 'bhind the Age' and that 'to tawk of ships as "Arts of Oke" was habsurd, hand if i wornt aware that Ships were like Spoons [...] i was litl better than a spoon myself'. The letter is supplemented by a 'balad' entitled ''Ard as Oak are Our Ships', a ballad that seeks to dissipate worries about the iron construction of ships: it insists that 'The old British Lion with his new iron chain. / Is cast in mould, that's all right in the main', that 'A Screw by an old Salt is not much admired, / But quickly our Screws will shell out, when required', and that the iron ships are ''Ard as Oak are our Ships'. Concludes by stressing the advantages of an iron over a wooden ship, including the fact that 'no rot can make he decay', and that 'our Bilers well made are by MAUDSLAY Maudslay, Henry (1771–1831) ODNB
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and PENN Penn, John (1805–78) ODNB
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, / Won't become half so crusty as some Captains we ken'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 132.

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Triumph of Homeopathy

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Homeopathy, Medical Treatment, Disease, Death


    Discusses news of Adolf, Freiherr von Willisen Willisen, Adolf Freiherr von (1798–1864) WBI
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, 'Prussian Minister at Rome', who died of '"perniciosa" fever', 'a sort of ague caused by malaria'. Punch regards this as a victory for homeopathy because Von Willisen's physician was a homeopath who, instead of treating his patient with 'large doses' of quinine, 'physicked' him with 'globules', and thus caused him to die.



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Issue 1212 (1 October 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 133.

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Solution of a Difficulty

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Archaeology, Comparative Philology


    Noting the existence and identity of two skulls of Oliver Cromwell Cromwell, Oliver (1599–1658) ODNB
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, discusses the 'somewhat parallel case' of two different daggers being presented, at 'the Archaeological Meeting in Warwick', as that with which John Felton Felton, John (d. 1628) ODNB
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killed George Villiers (1st Duke of Buckingham) Villiers, George, 1st Duke of Buckingham (1592–1628) ODNB
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. Punch attempts to explain why both William B P Feilding (7th Earl of Denbigh) Feilding, William Basil Percy, 7th Earl of Denbigh (1796–1865) WBI
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and Thomas Thistlethwayte Thistlethwayte, Thomas (1809–1900) WBI
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could claim to have inherited Felton's dagger.



Punch,  47 (1864), 134–35.

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Quiet Watering Places. No. II—Gwrysthlogwdd (Continued)  [6/9]Anon, 'Quiet Watering Places. No. I—Winklebeach', Punch, 47 (1864), 82
Anon, 'Quiet Watering Places. No. II—Gwrysthlogwdd (Continued)', Punch, 47 (1864), 156

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Diary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Human Development, Hunting


    Continuing his description of his travels in this fictional Welsh village, the narrator notes that he dined at an inn with 'three Jolly Companions from College', one of whom was called Gorilla. He does not explain 'the peculiar fitness of this title' but claims that 'if DU CHAILLU Du Chaillu, Paul Belloni (1831–1903) CBD
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had seen him, he would have shot him out of hand'. The diary reveals that the somewhat aggressive behaviour of Gorilla may explain his nickname. (134)



Punch,  47 (1864), 135.

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Mushrooms and Property

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Botany, Collecting, Nutrition, Environmentalism, Zoology, Natural History, Crime, Class


    Discusses the move by 'Prudent practical farmers of the fen counties [...] warning people against trespassing' in search of mushrooms. Proceeds to criticise the law regarding the ownership of wild mushrooms and ironically adopts an outrageously rigid position on wild and common natural property. Declares that 'all wild things', including mushrooms and strawberries, and common land and air, should be rejected. Adds that 'wild plants' should be abolished too, since medical treatments and therefore money can be made out of them, and that since 'All herbs and flowers' have a 'botanical value', they should 'belong to the owner of the soil on which they grow', and that children found guilty of picking them should be whipped in a house of correction. Goes on to insist that chasing butterflies should be made an 'indictable offence' and only legal for the 'proprietors of the fields and meadows over which they flutter'. Concludes by dismissing the notion that 'wildness inherent in any natural production' is 'common property' as a fallacy inherited from 'our illiberal ancestors'. Notes that 'landed property' is passing from the 'hereditary aristocracy' to 'our merchant princes', who 'know what property is' and have 'too much respect for the mushroom' to allow anybody to pick them.



Punch,  47 (1864), 139.

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The Royal British Association Under Hydrothermal Influence

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Geology, Progress, Heat, Zoology, Palaeontology, Physiology, Archaeology, Experiment, Crime, Politics


    Discusses Charles Lyell's Lyell, Sir Charles, 1st Baronet (1797–1875) DSB ODNB
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presidential address to the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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on the 'mysteries of geology and the hydrothermal blessings of Bath' (a version of which was published as Lyell 1865 Lyell, Charles 1865. 'Address', Report of the Thirty-Fourth Meeting of the British Association for the Advancement of Science; Held at Bath in September 1864, lx–lxxv
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). Focuses on Lyell's claim that 'The inhabitants of sea and land [...] before and after the grand development of ice and snow, were nearly the same'. Punch notes that the 'grand development' to which Lyell refered was the 'discovery' by Dr Grusselback Grusselback, Dr (fl. 1864) PU1/47/14/4
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that a snake 'which had been frozen to torpidity for ten years' was 'restored to activity'. However, wonders why, in the 'interests of science', Grusselback was not brought into the lecture theatre in a box of ice, and then 'vivified by the President with hydrothermal applications' and thus 'evidence that he was like "other creatures" before and after this grand development of ice and snow'. Ponders the practicallity of Grusselback's plan to try his freezing/revivification process on criminals, and then turns to several examples of the 'grand development of ice and snow'. These include the 'discovery of a number of people who had been frozen up in an Alpine Pass for a period of some eighteen years', some of whom 'were subjected to SIR CHARLES LYELL's "hydrothermal influence" and were likely to be brought to life when the director of the experiment discovered the body of an uncle whose estate he had inherited, and consequently gave up the experiment as a bad job'. Punch also notes Lyell's claim that hydrothermal influence has 'transformed bits of Roman bricks into opals' and how the discovery, by Aleksander F Middendorf Middendorf, Aleksander Fedorovich (1815–94) DSB
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, of a carcase 'preserved in a frozen mass for perhaps ten thousand years', shows 'nature anticipating' Grusselback: had the latter been present at the site of the mammoth, he would have resuscitated it by 'hydrothermal influence'. Praises Grusselback's proposed experiments on criminals as 'novel, economical and humane'. With a burgeoning prison population, the plan to 'Freeze them up' and then subject them to '"hydrothermal" treatment' at the end of their sentences, is welcomed. Punch then considers the benefits of freezing and later heating 'great men' of the day. For example, asks 'Why should we not take MR GLADSTONE Gladstone, William Ewart (1809–98) ODNB
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, and freeze him up till another generation be fit for democratic reform and philosophical finance'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 140.

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Main Drainage in Vain

Anon

Genre:

Poetry

Subjects:

Pollution, Sanitation, Public Health, Disease


    Opens by asking why, despite the sewerage system under London, 'millions of money' is still being spent on sending 'our dregs to the Brine'. Questions whether such locations as Hampton and Twickenham can supply pure water to the Metropolis: to 'afford the Thames prettier / Tributaries of unspeakable mud / Than those which now by the turtle-fed City are / Rendered'. Concludes by urging 'Father Thames' to 'Pour, from [...] an elegant urn / Water of crystalline diaphaneity' and to derive all his water from rural sources.



Punch,  47 (1864), 141.

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The Ethnology of Capitular Barbarism

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Ethnology, Animal Behaviour, Human Development, Religion, Crime


    Asks ethnologists to decide which 'tribe of barbarians' is responsible for 'chipping off the surfaces of our Cathedrals'. Noting that Armenians are said to have flayed St Bartholomew Bartholomew of Farne, Saint (d. 1193) ODNB
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, suggests that Charles Lyell Lyell, Sir Charles, 1st Baronet (1797–1875) DSB ODNB
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'might connect them with his pre-historic skinners of flints'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 142.

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Passage from the Diary of a Late Physician

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment


    'The fellow got well before I came'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 142.

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A Place for a Perfect Cure

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Hospitals, Religious Authority, Patronage

Institutions mentioned:

St Bartholomew's Hospital, St Bartholomew's Hospital
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St Thomas's Hospital, St Thomas's Hospital
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St Luke's Hospital, St Luke's Hospital
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St George's Hospital St George's Hospital
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    Noting how many London hospitals are named after saints, insists that hospitals are 'peculiarly Christian', pre-Reformation inventions that are not 'among the errors of Popery'. Proceeds to describe All Saints' Hospital, Eastbourne All Saints' Hospital, Eastbourne
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, a 'Convalescent Hospital' that 'is [...] needful to effect [...] a Perfect Cure'. Stresses how many London hospital surgeons have demanded such an institution and calls on anybody 'who has money to spare' to send it to All Saints' Hospital.



Punch,  47 (1864), 142.

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New Idea in Ethnology

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Ethnology, Human Development, Race, Cultural Geography, Exploration


    Notes that a 'distinguished explorer of Africa' has reported that 'the Makololos justify cattle-stealing by the argument that those who cannot keep their cattle have no right to them'. Suggests a comparison between the Makololos and the M'Gregors discussed in Scott 1818 Scott, Walter 1818. Rob Roy, 3 vols, Edinburgh: Archibald Constable and Co.
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, and wonders if Makololos should be spelt M'Cullolo. Concludes by arguing that a supposed 'connection between the Land of the Cakes and the Land of Negroes is corroborated by the fact that Scotland, as well as Africa, abounds in BLACKIES'.



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Issue 1213 (8 October 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 143.

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Advance in Astronomy

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Astronomy, Societies


    Noting that a paper on 'The Invisible Part of the Moon's Surface' was presented to the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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(a version of which was published as Webb 1865 Webb, Thomas William 1865. 'On the Invisible Part of the Moon's Surface', Report of the Thirty-Sixth Meeting of the British Association of the Advancement of Science held at Bath in September 1864, Notices and Abstracts of Miscellaneous Communications to the Sections, 9
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), surmises that 'For all that appears to the contrary' that side of the moon may be made of 'green cheese'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 143.

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The Banting Restaurant Joint Stock Company (Limited)

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Nutrition, Physiology, Chemistry, Scientific Practitioners


    Inspired by William Banting's Banting, William (1796/7–1878) ODNB
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extraordinary claims regarding diet and corpulence, this item advertises an 'Association' for 'enabling persons endowed with a hearty appetite, to gratify it without incurring the penalty of corpulence'. Explains that the company will prepare 'viands which, whilst excluding, as much as possible, saccharine, farinaceous, and oleaginous matters' guarantees pleasure to the palette. Boasts that 'Leading Professors of Chemistry and Gastronomy' have helped the company produce the required dishes.



Punch,  47 (1864), 145.

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'Cold Curate'

Charity Lambswool Lambswool, Charity
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Genre:

Introduction; Diary, Spoof

Subjects:

Religion, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Ornithology


    Presents extracts from an 'elegant Epistle' of 'young lady in the Country', which describes her father's need for a 'little Cold Curate', a species that appears to be a game bird but which could also be a clergyman. The author describes the curate as a 'shy bird', whose scarcity can be explained by the 'hardness of the ground' and the actions of the 'game-keepers of Manors'. Stresses some of the delights of the curate, including the fact that it has a 'tender' tongue and, unlike turtle cutlets, it is not 'too rich', and it also 'endeavours to secure a nice roosting-place in the church'. Urges that something should be done to 'make it more plump and partridge-like' and suggests that Henry J Temple (3rd Viscount Palmerston) Temple, Henry John, 3rd Viscount Palmerston (1784–1865) ODNB
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might throw a 'few bread-crumbs' into the curate's 'soft bill'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 146.

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Mother Goose on Modern Science

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Societies, Scientific Practitioners, Astronomy, Geology, Time, Stratigraphy, Human Development, Evolution, Controversy, Cosmology, Comparative Philology, Gender


    Written to represent a woman of limited literary ability, who is clearly irritated by the claims made by scientific practitioners. She begins by criticising the British Association for the Advancement of Science British Association for the Advancement of Science
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as a 'nasty good-for-nothin' lot' who engage in 'Ass-stronomy, geehology, and all that nonsense, botheration'. Proceeds to dismiss claims about 'the earth's age bein' so old as they makes it out', and ranks 'all them mouldy bones and things they find in them there strater' as worth less than 'a rotten tater'. Questions the value of excavating bones that do not contain any meat, and laments the 'row and rumpus / About Dewelopment and things as we was never meant to compass', disputes that 'comes to nothink'. Anticipates that 'one of these days' British Association members will 'find out that they've been all on 'em mistaken', and will be 'Forced to go back to what folks thought of old about the 'evinly bodies'—that the world is flat and, 'Beneath the crystial firmament' stands 'stock still'. Concludes by delighting in the possibility that 'relyin' on our senses' and 'our ideers' will displace 'all that there philosophy and wain pretences'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 150.

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The Condition of the Army Army
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Medical Officer

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners, War, Mental Illness


    Delighted at news that the Royal College of Physicians Royal College of Physicians
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is to appoint a committee to inquire into the 'condition of army medical officers', but warns that the inquiry does not appear to be 'particularly well defined'. Surmises that since the inquiry will probably not investigate 'the conditions of the army medical service', it will examine 'the conditions of the bodies' of practitioners, as well as their mental health and salaries.



Punch,  47 (1864), 151.

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Perils of Hippophagy

Grimalkin U Grimalkin
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Tabitha U Tabitha
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Genre:

Introduction; Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Nutrition, Animal Husbandry, Breeding, Zoology


    Comprises a spoof correspondence between Grimalkin and Tabitha (two domestic servants) on the revival in France of the fashion for eating horseflesh. Grimalkin, who shares a name with a horse in William Shakespeare's Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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Macbeth, complains that the eating of horses is an infringement 'upon our vested rights', and anticipates the spread of the culinary fashion to English tables, and its political consequences. In reply, Tabitha, discusses the effect of the fashion on the eating habits of 'modern menials', stressing how choosy domestic servants will become in the matter of horseflesh dishes. In a postscript, she denies that there has been a 'deterioration in racers' and compares the much better quality of contemporary horseflesh with that enjoyed by her great-great-grandmother.



Punch,  47 (1864), 151.

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New Appointment

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Astronomy


Punch,  47 (1864), 151.

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Ornithology

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Language


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1214 (15 October 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 153.

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An Awful Operation (Being an Account of a Wonderful Crop)

Professor Hairey Hairey, Professor
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Technology, Invention, Machinery, Accidents, Exhibitions


    The writer informs Mr Punch of his highly unpleasant experience of having his hair cut by machinery. Resolving that he will never endure this experience again, describes the scissors attached to ropes, the 'circular comb', disconcerting whirring noises like 'the deafening sound in a small manufactory, or in the Royal Polytechnic Institution Royal Polytechnic Institution
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during the hours of exhibition', the 'Medicated Balsamic Regenerator', the jet of 'Emollient Capellarion' gushing from the ceiling, and the violent whirrs of the mechanical drying machine.



Punch,  47 (1864), 153.

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A Capital Job for the Conjurors

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Charlatanry


    Announces the attempt by 'several of our best conjurors' to expose the 'means whereby the Spiritualists accomplish what they grandly term their "manifestations"', and the proposal to publish their labours in a book called 'Davenport Done', 'out of compliment' to William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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.



Punch,  47 (1864), 154.

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Where There's Smoke There's Fire

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Accidents, Military Technology, Reasoning


    Discusses news that 'Divers Assurance Companies' are refusing to compensate those injured in a recent gunpowder explosion near Erith. Challenges the juries' claim that 'damage sustained by an explosion is not damage by Fire' and wishes them to declare that 'gunpowder can explode without a fire'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 154.

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Sport and Sport

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Cruelty, Crime, Hunting, Class


    Discusses a trial at a police court in which a young boy was charged with cruelty to a cat. Disagrees with the judge's decision to sentence the boy to the house of correction, believing that 'any respectable, if ragged, school is fitter to instruct [such boys] in humanity'. Proceeds to note differences and similarities between this crime and traditional hunting. Points out that cats, unlike stags and hares, are not 'good for food', but, like stags and hares, they are 'killed for sport', and adds that while the gentry have an 'excuse' for shooting game, 'street-boys have not for killing cats'. However, the writer stresses the similarity between the street-boy and the noble sportsman (who might include the judge in the trial) and accordingly wonders why their respective acts of cruelty towards animals are marked in such different ways.



Punch,  47 (1864), 156.

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Quiet Watering Places. No. II—Gwrysthlogwdd (Continued)  [8/9]Anon, 'Quiet Watering Places. No. II—Gwrysthlogwdd (Continued)', Punch, 47 (1864), 134–35
Anon, 'Quiet Watering Places. No. II—Gwrysthlogwdd (Continued)', Punch, 47 (1864), 134–35

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Diary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Metaphysics, Ether, Crime


    The narrator describes his experiences of waking early one morning. Likening the 'large round-hand scrawl' in his diary to 'Spirit characters', he dismisses 'Spirits' but begins to imagine 'Unsettled Existences on the confines of space, Beings neither altogether unearthly nor entirely ethereal, Incomprehensible Agencies capable of visiting us mortals even in our own rooms!'. On seeing the door to his room being opened, he momentarily refers this to the action of 'Nothing' and 'Spirits', and speculating that he might confront burglars, decides that he would rather meet spirits than burglars.



Punch,  47 (1864), 161–62.

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A Sybilline Leaf

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Skill, Magic, Commerce, Supernaturalism, Telegraphy, Electricity


    Begins by judging that 'Humbug to spiritualism' is '"looking up", now that the Brothers DAVENPORT [William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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] are making "a sensation" out of their cupboard [the Davenports' site of spiritualistic activity]'. Insists that the conjuror John H Anderson Anderson, John Henry (1815–74) ODNB
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'may outdo all the marvels of all the Mediums', and contends that while it can accept Anderson, whose 'ingenuity and dexterity are legitimately employed in tricking our senses', it cannot accept spiritualism whose '"media" are substituted for mechanism, "spirits" for sleight-of-hand, and the mystical jargon of uneducated impostors' for Anderson's 'clever jugglery'. Proceeds to ridicule a 'circular' entitled 'The Greatest Discovery Ever Made' which it regards as the 'about the biggest dose of "flapdoodle" [nonsense]' to arrive in Britain from American spiritualists. The circular describes 'MEDIATION WRITING direct to, and from, the Spirit World, in One Minute', and Punch attacks the publication for poor grammar, a claim suggesting that only 'incapable ghosts' can communicate with mediums with 'degrading performances', such as 'accordion-playing out of tune'. Gives the false name Mrs Bounce Bubbler to the medium in question. Her powers of spirit communication prompt Punch to sympathise with the 'poor ghosts', unable to rest in peace. Presents the medium's explanation of her 'extraordinary gift' drawing on the analogy between the ability of man to communicate via the electric telegraph and the power of spirits to 'communicate from one sphere to another'. Punch thinks her argument begs the question of whether her gift is 'true' and wonders why the gift should be given to such 'hands' as Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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and Charles H Foster Foster, Charles H (fl. 1900) WBI
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. However, points out that Bubbler wishes to share her gift with others, although she does not explain how to receive answers to questions written out for the spirits of 'loved ones'. Goes on to express bewilderment at the number of spirits with whom Bubbler claims to be acquainted, a claim suggesting that 'Death, like misery, evidently makes men "acquainted with strange bedfellows"; and not the most heterogeneous "crush" at a scientific London conversazione'. These spirits include Isaac Newton Newton, Sir Isaac (1642–1727) DSB
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, who 'gives a philosophical explanation of this mediation writing', Emanuel Swedenborg Swedenborg, Emanuel (1688–1772) DSB
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, Francis Bacon (1st Viscount St Alban) Bacon, Francis, 1st Viscount St Alban (1561–1626) DSB ODNB
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, Benjamin C Brodie Brodie, Sir Benjamin Collins, 1st Baronet (1783–1862) DSB ODNB
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, and John Franklin Franklin, Sir John (1786–1847) ODNB
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. (161) Concludes by noting the low cost of Bubbler's séances and classes on spirit-writing.



Punch,  47 (1864), 163.

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Close of the Exhibition

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Engineering, Gender


    Noting the 'boldness of outline which distinguished the great Works of our modern female Artists', thinks that women's 'works in steel [i.e. crinoline dresses] have swept everything before them'. Insists that, in her crinoline, 'woman has triumphed over obstacles which some of our boldest engineers might have shuddered to approach', and believes Robert Stephenson Stephenson, Robert (1803–59) ODNB
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could not have carried 'a hollow cylinder over Ludgate Hill' single-handed, despite his 'tubular bridge' Britannia Bridge, Menai Straits
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over the Menai Straits.



Punch,  47 (1864), 163.

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The Knot Untied

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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Issue 1215 (22 October 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 165.

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An Experiment Suggested for the Medium Humbugs

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture

Publications cited:

Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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    Shows a male and a female medium, both of whom have their feet locked in stocks and a hand locked onto the same post. The caption urges that the mediums should be left there 'until the spirits release them' and reveals that the 'Old Female Medium' wishes this would happen.



Punch,  47 (1864), 166.

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'Odd's Snails'—Antiquated Oaths

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Physiology, Nutrition, Animal Behaviour, Human Development


    Discusses an extract from an article in Galgnani's Messenger Galignani's Messenger (1821–95) Waterloo Directory
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describing the huge quantities of snails eaten by Parisians. Noting that 'it is now understood that human beings acquire a certain portion of the nature of that on which they feed', anticipates the ways in which 'Parisian nature will assimilate itself to that of the snail'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 166.

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Astrology at Fault (To ZADKIEL Morrison, Richard James ('Zadkiel') (1795–1874) ODNB
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Tao Tze)

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Astrology, Meteorology, Prognostication, Charlatanry, Reason, Quackery


    Thinks that like his 'next year's Almanac Zadkiel's Almanac and Herald of Astrology (1836–1900+) BUCOP
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', Zadkiel is 'just out', because he 'ne'er divined the drought'. Proceeds to argue that if Zadkiel could 'foretell' the weather 'by the stars' then he could 'prophesy' events too, but that the latter could only be trusted if they were based on 'rational pretence' rather than 'transparent impudence'. However, since Zadkiel cannot 'See if the Seasons will be wet or dry', his Alamanac will only trusted by simpletons. Zadkiel is proclaimed a 'quack'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 173.

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The Thieves' Congress

Anon

Genre:

Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Crime, Machinery, Invention


Punch,  47 (1864), 174.

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High Breeding in the Highlands

Jeannie Jeannie
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Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Husbandry, Breeding, Exhibitions


    Written from the perspective of a Scottish cow, Jeannie, who begins by proudly upholding the strength of a 'braw' from the 'Hielands', and boasting of the fact that she and her ancestors have won prizes for their 'guid breeding'. Proceeds to challenge an extract from an article in the Illustrated London News Illustrated London News (1842–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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which claims that cows 'think nothing' of walking forty miles on round trips to cattle shows. Jeannie wonders how the author can know what cows are thinking, although she upholds the article as proof of the genuine superiority of Scottish to the fatter Southern cows. Concludes by challenging any other 'prize coo at the Smithfield Show Smithfield Club—Cattle Show
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ta year to talk frae Lunnon to the Land's Eend wi' a calf a piece beside us'.



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Issue 1216 (29 October 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 176.

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Rayther too Cool

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Politics, Government, Nationalism, War, Navigation, Astronomy

People mentioned:

William Parsons, Parsons, William, 3rd Earl of Rosse (1800–67) DSB
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John F W Herschel Herschel, Sir John Frederick William (1792–1871) DSB ODNB
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Punch,  47 (1864), 177.

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Conservative Magazines

Anon

Genre:

Essay

Subjects:

Periodicals, Politics, Environmentalism, Industry, Utilitarianism, Railways, Pollution, Progress


    Criticises a 'long dreary correspondence' received from a correspondent who 'babbles o' green fields' and generally laments the destruction of the natural environment by industry. Considers the correspondent to be 'an unsocial, ungenial, ridiculous old curmudgeon' and presents the correspondent's argument that to sustain 'poetic faculty and the spiritual mind amongst us' a 'compromise should be struck with the utilitarian proclivity of the age by transferring, to the most beautiful portions of the British scenery still remaining, the various powder-mills and magazines'. Thinks the correspondent 'can't keep pace with these railroad times', and rejects his complaints about polluted rivers and his refusal to accept the 'situation which the inexorable logic of material utilitarianism imposes on him'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 177.

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Demons of the Future

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Commerce, Futurism


    Presents a series of advertisements 'from the London daily papers of ten years hence'. All the advertisements poke fun at the claims and practices of spiritualism by anticipating its future manifestations. For example, it includes an advertisement from the 'Spectral Hands-Club' who meet at midnight, an 'Apology' from a 'Spirit who inadvertently knocked out a gentleman's eye' during a séance, and an announcement that the 'Ghost of Wolfgang A Mozart Mozart, (Johannes Chrysostom) Wolfgang Amadeus (1756–91) CBD
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will be called upon at the Musical Phantom Association Meeting [...] and will play some variations on the supernatural music in Don Giovanni'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 181.

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Tests of 'Mediumship'

Ferguson Ferguson
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Skill, Crime


    Points out that the role of Mr Calcraft Calcraft, Mr (fl. 1864) PU1/47/18/4
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in the allegedly spiritualistic feats of William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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has been overlooked. Explains how Calcraft ties the knots in the rope that constrains the Davenports during their performance, and that the brothers are prepared to attempt to undo the knots tied by Calcraft. Adds that Calcraft is willing to tie up the brothers in the Old Bailey Old Bailey Sessions Court
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to 'prove their pretensions'. Concludes by noting that if any mediums are handcuffed after being arrested, the handcuffs would later be 'found unfastened'. The name of the author of this article is probably inspired by Jesse B Ferguson Ferguson, Jesse Babcock (fl. 1864) Fodor 1934
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, the American preacher who acted as the Davenport brothers' secretary.



Punch,  47 (1864), 182.

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Fashionable Arrivals

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Practitioners


Punch,  47 (1864), 184.

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Climbing Fish

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoology, Natural History, Hunting


    Discusses the attempt by the Thames Angling Society Thames Angling Society
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to 'apply for the erection of fish ladders at the weirs of Teddington and Moulsey Locks'. Adds that after consultation with Francis T Buckland Buckland, Francis Trevelyan (1826–80) ODNB
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, the Conservators of the River Thames Conservators of the River Thames
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agreed and instructed their engineer to erect the ladders.



Punch,  47 (1864), 184.

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Motto for the Davenports

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture


    'Shut Up'.



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Issue 1217 (5 November 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 186.

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Quacks and Contemporaries

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Quackery, Charlatanry, Periodicals


    Relates a news story concerning a court case, with the names altered. Chronicles Captain Blank's purchase of a 'popular medical work by Dr. Asterisks and Co.', a book that 'is mainly a record of fictitious cases wherein symptoms similar to his own [including dysfunctional liver and nervousness] are attributed to unphysiological mistakes, which he is conscious of having made at some time of his life' and which will cause him to be ridiculed. Blank then orders medicines which Asterisks claims are the only cure for his symptoms. However, Asterisks threatens to publicise Blank's embarrassing details if he refuses to pay for the medicines. Lambasts Asterisks and Co. as representatives of the 'whole tribe of scoundrels' whose names dirty the newspaper columns and who deserve to serve 'penal servitude'. Urges those newspapers that 'publish the advertisements of obscene quacks' that they are 'accomplices' of quackery, and wonders whether their circulation is so small that they have to accept such advertising. Emphasises the differences between qualified practitioners and quacks, notably that the former do not advertise their addresses, but can be found in Churchill's Medical Directory London Medical Directory (1845–47) London and Provincial Medical Directory (1847–69) Medical Directory (1869–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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.



Punch,  47 (1864), 186.

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Why Sew-Called?

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Domestic Economy, Technology


Punch,  47 (1864), 186.

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Mother Medium

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Communication, Charlatanry, Gender


    Written from the perspective of a female medium of limited literary ability, this poem describes her attempts to communicate with 'sperrits'. She asks the spirits to 'sinnify their presence in the usal way by raps' and then explains to a gentleman how to use 'the halfabet' to decode the raps. She then enquires whether there are any messages from the ladies and gentlemen to the spirits, and vice versa, and asks the 'Sperrit' to 'rap the party' when she sees the appropriate person. She reassures her 'party' that 'there ain't no himposition', that 'sperrit 'ands is what you feels' and that she has 'got no tame monkey what runs up my Crinoline'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 186.

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The Consequence of Dining with the Société Hippophagiène Société Hippophagiène
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Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Zoology


    'Nightmare'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 187.

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Skye High!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Aeronautics, Travel

People mentioned:

Henry T Coxwell, Coxwell, Henry (Tracey) (1819–1900) ODNB
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James Glaisher Glaisher, James (1809–1903) DSB
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Publications cited:

The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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Punch,  47 (1864), 187.

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Election Information

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Politics


Punch,  47 (1864), 187.

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The Original 'Trap to Catch a Sunbeam'

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Comparative Philology, Heat, Light, Invention


Punch,  47 (1864), 188, 191.

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The Naggletons on Spiritualism

Anon

Genre:

Regular Feature, Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Gender, Imposture, Methodology


    Consists of a long dialogue between Mr and Mrs Naggleton on the former's visit to a séance. Mrs Naggleton is very surprised at her husband's actions and reveals her scepticism towards the 'manifestations' that he claims to have seen. She insists that he has been witnessing a 'wicked folly' that has made him nervous and, despite her constant refusals to hear what he saw, she allows him to relate his experiences. He later describes the séance circle during which participants allegedly 'heard some scratchings and knockings, and then music began to play in different parts of the room, the instruments moving about'. Mrs Naggleton remains sceptical, suggesting mechanical explanations for these spiritualistic manifestations: for example, she thinks the 'strong and mysterious wind' felt by her husband was not produced by 'spirits' wings' but by a 'Pair of bellows'. Mr Naggleton later shows his wife a 'spirit hand' that she believes to be fraudulent, but then reveals that the spirit hand confirmed his suspicions about the séance but that he did not articulate such doubts during the séance. Mrs Naggleton subsequently tells him that she is glad he 'had sense enough not to be deceived by the jugglers'.



Punch,  47 (1864), [189].

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The American Brothers; or, 'How Will they Get Out of It?'

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Politics, War, Charlatanry


    This illustration shows Abraham Lincoln Lincoln, Abraham (1809–65) CBD
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and Jefferson Davis Davis, Jefferson (1808–89) CBD
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, the leaders of the Union and Confederate causes in the American Civil War, as the American mediums William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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. Just as the Davenport brothers produced spiritualistic manifestations whilst tied to chairs in a wooden box, so the American leaders are shown tied to wooden benches with ropes. The ropes around both are labelled 'debt': this is a reference to the crippling debts incurred both by the Unionist and Confederate forces, debts from which neither side seemed able to escape.



Punch,  47 (1864), 192.

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The Donkey and the Davenports

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Commerce

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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Punch,  47 (1864), 193.

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Done Brown

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Mechanics

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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    Asks whether spiritualists can show the same items of furniture 'in two places at the same time', and boasts that Punch can: furniture standing in a room in London 'is all in "Holland"'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 193.

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Telegrams

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Telegraphy


Punch,  47 (1864), 193.

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Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism


Punch,  47 (1864), 193.

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A Rap for the Spirits

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Psychology, Mental Illness, Imposture, Charlatanry, Methodology, Force


    Begins by recalling his introduction to 'the Spiritual school' as a child when he 'cowered' in dread from 'Old Boguey', but then describes the change in the fashion for ghosts, with 'Old Boguey' being 'promoted / From nursery to first floor' and spirits being 'employed' to provide 'fools'-caps' rather than 'night-caps'. Describes the dubious feats of Daniel D Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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, Charles H Foster Foster, Charles H (fl. 1900) WBI
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and their gullible audiences. Turns to William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, stressing the ways in which they 'draw fools in' with their ropes, and profit from 'wriggling' themselves loose, much like 'many a politician'. Describes the support given to spiritualism by Dion Boucicault Boucicault, Dion (1820–90) ODNB
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and concludes by pointing out how 'humbug follows science, / As shadow waits on light', and how truth has to fight, and proposes a toast to to '"the great asinine mystery"—/ That oldest "od-force"—folly'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 193.

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Conclusive

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Proof


    Claims that Samuel C Hall Hall, Samuel Carter (1800–89) ODNB
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replied to a request for proof that spirits exist by insisting that 'The Sperrits are above proof'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 193.

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Retreat for Decayed Spiritualists

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Mental Illness


    'The Home Home, Daniel Dunglas (1833–86) ODNB
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for Idiots'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 196.

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The Black Art, Indeed

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Force, Religion


    Suggests that the power apparently exhibited by William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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is 'the Power of Darkness', owing to the gas-light having to be dimmed during a performance.



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Issue 1218 (12 November 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 197.

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Punch's Spirit Meetings. Introduction. Mr Punch has Become a Convert to Spiritualism

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Diary, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Religion, Supernaturalism, Experiment, Astronomy, Extra-Terrestrial Life, Cosmology, Palaeontology


    Begins by explaining how Mr Punch, 'having entirely and dispassionately considered' spiritualism, 'having examined the evidences, having witnessed thousands of experiments', having studied 'spiritual books', and having 'regarded the scholarly, pure, and disinterested character of the well-born and refined persons who practise Spiritualism', has 'convinced himself that the Spirits are genuine'. Explains the seriousness with which Mr Punch has taken his new creed, including his construction of a 'Temple of Spiritualism', and presents a diary of the séance at which his conversion took place. There Mr Punch had observed such notorious spiritualistic phenomena as a fiery object flying across the room and spirits rubbing people's legs. The diary reveals how he communicated with the spirits of Jonathan Swift Swift, Jonathan (1667–1745) ODNB
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, Nicholas Copernicus Copernicus, Nicholas (1473–1543) DSB
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, and others, Copernicus informing Mr Punch that the moon is made from ivory taken 'From the tusks of mammoths, mastodons, and megatheria, existing for fourteen billions of years before the world was created, and it was fused together by the action of volcanoes, and polished by attrition with the Equator or Eqinoxious Line'. However, Copernicus refuses to answer Mr Punch's question regarding the habitation of the moon. Later Mr Punch asks the spirits to help him locate a 'new pair of black trousers' which he has mislaid: although the spirits provide much incomprehensible information regarding other topics, they finally reveal that Mr Punch's trousers have been pawned.



Punch,  47 (1864), 197.

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The End of Table-Turning

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Mental Illness, Mathematics


Punch,  47 (1864), 198.

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Some Compliment to Punch

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Periodicals

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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Publications cited:

Spiritual Magazine Spiritual Magazine (1860–77) Waterloo Directory
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Punch,  47 (1864), [199].

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Medium and Re-Medium

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Gender, Commerce, Supernaturalism, Magic, Cultural Geography, Race, Politics


    This illustration shows two juxtaposed scenes from which the reader is invited to see similarities. In one scene, a woman medium is seen handling bags of money and she sits near the tools of her trade: 'spirit' hands on the end of an extendable wire frame and an accordion. The caption from the 'English Papers' relates the large amounts of money spiritualists make from 'duping fools into the belief that they see supernatural performances'. In the other scene, an Irish witch sits in a gloomy prison cell. The caption from the 'Irish Papers' indicates that she was found guilty of 'pretending to show apparitions to her ignorant dupes' and has been punished.



Punch,  47 (1864), 201.

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Body and Spirit

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Nutrition, Imposture, Magic


    Suggests that two tiresome 'attractions'—William Banting Banting, William (1796/7–1878) ODNB
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(the corpulent writer whose works on diet were proving immensely successful), and the mediums, William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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— should be combined. Proposes that Banting (who 'may surely count' as two men) should go into the Davenports' famous spirit 'cupboard' and 'come out two BANTINGS, of DAVENPORT size, while the two DAVENPORTS should also enter and come out one DAVENPORT, of BANTING size'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 202.

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Medium et Remedium

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Race, Cultural Geography, Gender


    Following John Tenniel, 'Medium and Re-Medium', Punch, 47 (1864), [199], this poem contains puns on the names of Mrs Do-hany in Carrick, and Mrs Do-many in London. While the former 'picks oakum on skilly', the latter 'lives well, and sacks guineas', and both play on the 'folly of credulous ninnies'. Explains that Mrs Do-many makes money from 'sperrits' that perform such feats as 'jingle / Accordions', and concludes that just as Mrs Do-hany has been imprisoned, so should Mrs Do-many.



Punch,  47 (1864), 203.

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Spiritualism

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Industry


Punch,  47 (1864), 204.

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American Trumps

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Music, Instruments

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1219 (19 November 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 205.

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The Black Art at Newcastle

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Crime, Charlatanry


    Challenges the decision of a Newcastle court to dismiss an application from 'a gentleman' who sought to prosecute William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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under the Witchcraft Act, which 'enacts penalties or imprisonment' on those who use 'skills or knowledge in any occult or crafty science'. Thinks that the law should be changed so that it includes 'operations of "the Spirits"', not least to protect the 'few silly women and sillier men who believe in such things'. Claims that it is prepared to 'make allowance' for the feelings of 'Spirit-mongers', but insists on regarding them as the lowest type of 'knave'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 206.

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Knotty Points in Spiritualism

Anon

Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Morality, Industry


    The writer of this letter introduces herself as 'an old woman living far away from the Metropolis', and proceeds to discuss the activities of William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, 'wild young men' who 'repudiate all human ties, excepting, of course, those of a purely moral nature'. Complains about the poor security of parcels and reports that her 'carrier' explained how 'Sperets took to undoing of knots' binding the goods. Likens the 'volatile spirits' to mushrooms in that they 'spring up at night', Noting that the Davenport brothers have been enrolled by 'Spectacle-Makers' and 'Cordwinders', believes 'something should be done to relieve the poor distressed Spirits who perform all the knotty work' and to find them 'more creditable employment'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 207.

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The Oracle of the Delphi Company (Limited)

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Commerce, Spiritualism, Imposture, Religion, Mental Illness


    Introduces the Delphi Company as a 'Society' for taking money 'from the pockets of the confiding public, and performing the wondrous operation of raising the wind by spiritual agency'. Proceeds to compare modern with ancient spiritualism, and explains that the medium employed by their firm is a latter-day 'Pythoness' who sits on a 'three-legged stool', and thus constitutes an 'Oracle'. Stresses that the number of spiritualists who have entered lunatic asylums will answer shareholders' questions about the uses of spiritualism, and that the spiritual provenance of the medium's power should not offend 'religious convictions'. Concludes by insisting that the 'respectability of its projectors will preclude any idea' that they, unlike William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, will 'bolt with the money'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 208.

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Natives and Settlers

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Breeding, Agriculture, Climatology


    Discusses a recent oyster show at the Jardin d'Acclimatation, Paris Jardin d'acclimatation, Paris
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. The author expresses relish for the 'little fat oysters' on show and claims that he will 'give a good account of them' if 'Acclimatising Gardeners, just by way of experiment, would plant some in our larder'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 211.

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Motto for the Society for the Propagation of Cruelty of Animals

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Animal Behaviour, Crime


    'The Cart before the Horse'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 211.

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'Doing' Banting Banting, William (1796/7–1878) ODNB
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Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition


Punch,  47 (1864), 212.

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A Spirited Remark

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Narcotics

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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Punch,  47 (1864), 213.

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The Goshawk and the Hen Harrier (To the HONOURABLE GRANTLEY BERKELEY Berkeley, George Charles Grantley Fitzhardinge (1800–81) ODNB
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)

Bob Moody Moody, Bob
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Hunting, Ornithology, Taxonomy, Class, Reading, Museums


    Written in a style of a rustic who identifies Grantley Berkeley Berkeley, George Charles Grantley Fitzhardinge (1800–81) ODNB
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as a 'Spoortsman' and himself as a poacher, and discusses the differences between a 'patridge and a sparrer'. Anticipating Berkeley's greater knowledge of this question, he notes the sportsman's familiarity with the Hampshire goshawks which are also confused with hen harriers. Explains that he and Berkeley should 'know summut about hawks' and how the owl, 'the bird o'widsom [...] knows a hawk from hen harrier' and wonders why 'English gentlemen' are unaware of this difference. Thinks that the ancestors of such gentlemen, people who 'spent their time in hawkun', would not be impressed by their descendants' inability to distinguish a hen harrier from a goshawk. Explains that ancient barons regarded goshawks as 'first-rate' hawks and could distinguish them from 'long-winged hawks', 'short-winged hawks', and hen harriers. Boasts that he has 'got a new book' which has helped him distinguish the goshawk from the hen harrier and urges Berkeley to inspect the stuffed birds at the British Museum British Museum
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in order to help him make the correct distinction.



Punch,  47 (1864), 213.

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Shakespeare's Shakespeare, William (1564–1616) ODNB
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Library

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Mathematics

People mentioned:

Euclid Euclid (fl. 295 BC) DSB
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Punch,  47 (1864), 214.

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Query for Professor Owen Owen, Richard (1804–92) DSB
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Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Ornithology, Taxonomy


    'Is Neptune a Kingfisher?'.



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Issue 1220 (26 November 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 215.

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An Inquest on an Inquest

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Crime, Natural Theology, Anatomy, Religious Authority


    Introduces a recent inquest held by Mr Punch upon an earlier inquest. The latter revealed that a clergyman, John Hunt Hunt, John (fl. 1864) PU1/47/22/1
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, who 'systematically studied anatomy' in order to search out Nature's 'glorious and miraculous works', had obtained from a physician a stillborn body for 'acquiring anatomical knowledge'. While his actions did not appear to infringe the Anatomy Act or 'the decencies of life or death', a churchwarden took action that resulted in his trial. During the trial, the judge defended the legitimacy of Hunt's medical studies but the jury decided that Hunt should confine his studies to 'matters of a clerical character'. Mr Punch's jury, however, accused the actual jury of 'Snobbish Impertinence' and claimed that it would be better if 'vulgar blockheads' were not 'eligible to serve on Coroner's juries', but were instead 'obliged to mind their own business'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 217.

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The Wonders of Modern Travel  [1/3]Anon, 'The Wonders of Modern Travel', Punch, 47 (1864), 241
Anon, 'The Wonders of Modern Travel', Punch, 47 (1864), 264

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Travel


Punch,  47 (1864), 218.

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First Class Travelling

C K Keene, Charles Samuel (1823–91) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

C K Keene, Charles Samuel (1823–91) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Railways, Travel, Physiology


    Shows the various postures adopted by a Scottish man during his railway journey from Edinburgh to London, 'in the vain endeavour to obtain relief for his legs'. He tries resting with one and then both legs in the air, and then with his legs brought up to his torso.



Punch,  47 (1864), 222.

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Admirable Imitation

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Environmentalism


    Announces the measures taken by John P Spencer (5th Earl Spencer) Spencer, John Poyntz, 5th Earl Spencer (1835–1910) ODNB
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'for the perpetual reservation of Wimbledon Common Wimbledon Common
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for the benefit of the public', moves that have prompted 'similar steps' to be taken 'with respect to Hampstead Heath'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 221.

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The Davenports Done Up

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Display, Medical Practitioners


    Describes how John Scoffern Scoffern, John (1814–82) COPAC
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'exposed the whole concern' of William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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. Explains that Scoffern visited the Davenports' 'exhibition' in London and became suspicious when the brothers prevaricated over the question of 'how they operate', and refused to allow him to tie them up or enter the 'wooden Cabinet' where they performed their allegedly spiritualistic feats. Scoffern instead treated the cabinet as a 'case / Of phthisicial affection' and listened to what was happening inside it. The Davenports, however, proceeded to annoy Scoffern while he addressed the audience, who subsequently 'hissed and hooted' the Davenports. Punch concludes that 'there's an end to public pay / Of impudent deceivers'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 221.

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The Fusibility of the People's

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Miracle, Supernaturalism, Politics, Nationalism

People mentioned:

St Januarius Januarius, Saint (or San Gennaro) (d. c. 305) CBD
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Punch,  47 (1864), 222.

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Wimbledon Preserved

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Environmentalism, Physiology, Health, Feeling, Natural Theology, Progress, Industry


    Evidently following news discussed in Anon, 'Admirable Imitation', Punch, 47 (1864), 222, this poem begins by explaining that just as Ataeus 'ever must renew his force / Upon earth's bosom' so we, to prevent our decline, 'must regard the lilies of the field' and gain inspiration from 'Heaven's hieroglyphics in Earth's book unsealed'. Questions how this can be done 'if always spreading, day by day, / The City creep o'er meadow, heath, and moor'. However, relishes the thought that there will be 'one retreat'—Wimbledon Common Wimbledon Common
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—'Kept sacred' by the 'noble' John P Spencer (5th Earl Spencer) Spencer, John Poyntz, 5th Earl Spencer (1835–1910) ODNB
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.



Punch,  47 (1864), 222.

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P-promise and Pep-performance

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Drollery

Subjects:

Exhibitions, Display

People mentioned:

John H Pepper Pepper, John Henry (1821–1900) ODNB
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Institutions mentioned:

Royal Polytechnic Institution Royal Polytechnic Institution
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Punch,  47 (1864), 222.

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Question for Agriculturists

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Agriculture, Nutrition, Language


Punch,  47 (1864), 223.

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A Fragment

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Fragment, Spoof

Subjects:

Zoology, Hunting

People mentioned:

Konrad Gesner Gesner, Konrad (1516–65) DSB
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    Presents a 'fragment of the long lost Eleventh Chapter of the Compleat Angler Walton, Isaak 1653. The Compleat Angler; or, The Contemplative Man's Recreation. Being a Discourse of Fish and Fishing, Not Unworthy the Perusal of Most Anglers [...] London: Richard Marriot
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', which comprises a dialogue between 'Venator' and 'Piscator' on the characteristics of various fish as connoted by their names. For example, the chub is described as a fish that is 'very difficult to pick' (a reference to the lock company founded by Charles Chubb Chubb, Charles (1772–1846) ODNB
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) and a variety of the 'Bramah' (a lock originally made by Joseph Bramah Bramah, Joseph (1748–1814) ODNB
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). The parr is described as a fish 'that has been known to live upward of a hundred years (a reference to Thomas Parr Parr, Thomas ('Old Parr') (d. 1635) ODNB
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, known as 'Old Parr') and the pike is characterised as 'a solitary, morose, and very voracious' fish that takes a 'toll of all that pass'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 223.

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The Great Sewage Question

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Pollution, Sanitation, Commerce, Politics, Government, Public Health, Engineering, Controversy


    Discusses the 'movements at work in the City' which have 'rudely upset' the author's 'favourite notions'. These include the fact that the Metropolitan Board of Works Metropolitan Board of Works
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has 'of late giv'n up words, / And really taken to working', and that the famous giants of London, Gog and Magog, who lie about in the 'Metropolitan Sewage', are 'getting all by the ears with Thwaites Thwaites, Sir John (1815–1870) ODNB
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and his peers' for not calculating the value of the sewage. Recalls the time when 'Town Boards' rejected the idea of sewers, but observes how 'London's beginning to think gold of winning / From her drains'. Anticipates that 'With our iron and coal fields, we'll boast of our gold-fields, / Irrigated by streams (od) auriferous' and expects sewage to yield guano and that its spreading will 'make the world wiser'. Observes the number of recent battles, including those of 'styles, schools, and gauges', but adds that the 'quarrel that well fits this new age / Which defines Dirt as "matter left in the wrong place"—/ The battle of schemes for sewage'. The conclusion reveals that the battle is being fought between 'THWAITES, NAPIER Napier, Robert (1791–1876) ODNB
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& CO.', and Thomas Ellis Ellis, Thomas (fl. 1864) Palmer's
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, John Brady Brady, John (1812–87) Stenton 1976WBI
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, and Robert Montague Montagu, Lord Robert (1825–1902) ODNB
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, and hopes that the best will win.



Punch,  47 (1864), 223.

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Three Railway Gauges

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Engineering, Controversy


    'Trains made for the Broad Gauge, the Narrow Gauge, and the Lug-gage'.



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Issue 1221 (3 December 1847)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 225.

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Literary Intelligence

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Publishing, Monstrosities, Manufactories, Anatomy, Textbooks


    Announces a list of forthcoming works whose titles bear some relation to the names of their publishers. For example, 'A Treatise on the Skeleton (BOHN's Bohn, Henry George (1796–1884) ODNB
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Series)'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 227.

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A Nice Thing in Caps

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, Accidents


Punch,  47 (1864), 228.

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Two Quacks in Quod

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Crime, Medical Treatment, Imposture


    Relishes news that judge George W W Bramwell Bramwell, George William Wilshere, 1st Baron Bramwell (1808–92) ODNB
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has passed custodial sentences on two advertising quacks, A F Henery Henery, A F (fl. 1864) Palmer's
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and Mr Anderson Anderson, Mr (fl. 1864) PU1/47/23/3
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, who 'traded on the silly fears of a young officer' (cf. Anon, 'Quacks and Contemporaries', Punch, 47 (1864), 186). Warns the governor of the jail to be wary of 'felons with a smattering of medical science' who may feign illness. Ponders the fact that only 'two rascals' have been 'caged', and that Mr Punch's file contains information on many who have not come before Bramwell. Threatens: 'Woe to the first on whom Mr. Punch shall lay the Iron Flail'. Insists that Punch is only mentioning this repugnant subject 'from a sense of duty' to those who may fall victim to 'these cold-blooded extortioners and quacks'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 228.

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'Angels and Ministers'

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Evolution, Human Development, Human Species, Natural Theology, Religion, Supernaturalism


    Reports that Benjamin Disraeli Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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has insisted that the 'question now asked by science of society' is: 'Is man Ape or Angel'. Adds that Disraeli declared himself to be 'on the side of the Angel', a remark suggesting that 'Ministers had best look out' for Disraeli 'shall henceforth be our "Angelic Doctor"'. Concludes by pointing out that Punch 'never thought him in the least like an Ape-man', although it 'fancied him a little of Apemantus'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 231.

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The Patent Restorer for the Hair

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Human Development, Invention, Physiology


    This illustration shows a balding elderly man writing a letter at a desk. With only a few hairs sprouting from his scalp, he feels obliged to write a testimonial to the producers of the hair restorer, noting that his 'hair has already recovered its former luxuriance'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 231.

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Emancipate Your Gas

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Industry, Commerce, Politics


    Calls on Britons to demand cheaper gas, and to join the 'cheap gas movement headed by the gallant GEORGE FLINTOFF Flintoff, George (fl. 1864) PU1/47/23/6
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', and thus 'put the tyrannic Companies' pipes out'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 232.

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The Weather and the Parks

Anon

Genre:

Introduction; Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Meteorology, Expertise, Observatories, Periodicals

People mentioned:

George Bishop Bishop, George (1785–1861) ODNB
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    Presents what Punch believes to be meteorological information 'totally inaccessible to the daily or weekly journals'. This information is presented as if it were exclusive and esoteric, but is in fact quite vague and mundane. For example, 'a friend whose official position gives incalculable weight to any statement that he may make' states that it is 'a very cold day', 'a certain noble Lord' observed that the 'days would now begin to draw in', and the 'Astronomer Royal' (George B Airy Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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) after ordering 'two dozen barometers' was only able to predict a 'wet night'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 232–33.

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Punch's Scientific Register

Anon

Genre:

Introduction, Drollery; Proceedings, Spoof

Subjects:

Societies, Scientific Practitioners, Periodicals, Publishing, Geology, Mineralogy, Magnetism, Palaeontology, Archaeology, Comparative Philology, Industry, Zoology, Zoological Gardens, Botany, Natural History, Animal Behaviour, Human Development, Physical Geography, Exploration, Mapping, Taxonomy, Vulcanology, Photography, Anaesthesia, Light, Astronomy, Extra-Terrestrial Life, Cosmology

Institutions mentioned:

Zoological Society—Gardens, Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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Metropolitan Board of Works Metropolitan Board of Works
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    Explains that, in response to the 'desire of the Scientific World', Mr Punch has decided to present 'a record of the proceedings of the various societies which meet to bewilder themselves with wisdom'. Points out that Mr Punch has edited the proceedings and hopes that these will be regarded by scientific societies as the source for the 'latest and best information on science'. These spoof proceedings describe the activities of six scientific organisations, namely the Geological Society Geological Society of London
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, the Zoological Society Zoological Society of London
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, the Royal Geographical Society Royal Geographical Society
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, the Photographic Society Photographic Society of London
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, the Royal Astronomical Society Royal Astronomical Society
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, and the Royal Archaeological Institute Royal Archaeological Institute
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. Scientific activity is presented as bewildering, abstract, and often absurd. At the Geological Society, Mr Fondlesquaw presented his observations on 'a large number of interesting miocene corals' found on a London street. At the Archaelogical Institute, Mr Grundy 'exhibited an ancient heir-loom, which had evidently been used for looming hair'. (232) At the Zoological Society, Professor Phlunkey 'exhibited an exceedingly fine toad, which he had captured in a pond at Hampstead, and which he stated to be edible'. At the Geographical Society, a letter was received from Mr Wool Gatherer 'who stated that he did not know exactly where he was at present, but that when he found out he would let the Society know': the society then awarded him a gold medal for his efforts. At the Photographic Society there was a paper on the 'Best Mode of Keeping Babies Still for the Photographic Sitting'. At the Astronomical Society, the meeting featured a paper from Mr De Transit on his '"Observations upon the last Solar Eclipse", which he had been unable to see, owing to its being invisible in England'. (233)



Punch,  47 (1864), 233.

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A Man of Peace in the Mediterranean

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Military Technology, War, Steamships, Internationalism


    Reporting that the Admiral Admiral, ship
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, a large wooden ship carrying '121 guns, 1,100 men, and engines of 1,000 horse-power', has been sent to the Mediterranean, surmises that it must have been sent there 'as a hostage' or as an emblem of peace, because it will not be able to sustain an attack from ironclads.



Punch,  47 (1864), 234.

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A Fast Performance

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Skill, Imposture, Steamships


    Thinks the 'clever conjuror' is not only like William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, but faster than a Samuel Cunard Cunard, Sir Samuel (1787–1865) ODNB
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ship: 'he can go at a rate of from sixty to a hundred knots per hour'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 234.

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Ménu of the Future

Anon

Genre:

Miscellaneous, Drollery

Subjects:

Nutrition, Health, Monstrosities, Zoology


    Subtitled 'A Possible Result of the Efforts of the Acclimatisation Society Acclimatisation Society, New South Wales
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', this menu includes dishes prepared from animal species that will become acclimatised in Britain in the future. For example, the fish dishes include 'Crimped Kraken', while 'Pickled Scales of Sea-Serpent' and 'Gorilla's Ears in Sherbet' are served at the end of the meal.



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Issue 1222 (10 December 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 235.

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No Relief on Sunday!

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary

Subjects:

Religious Authority, Religion, Medical Treatment, Class


    Begins by noting that the North British Railway Company North British Railway Company
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supports the campaign of 'Scotch Sabbatarians' on the grounds that it maintains Christian law. Draws their attention to an alarming letter in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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from 'A Medical Officer' who describes 'a most dreadful case of malignant fever' which had not been treated (with a 'drop of wine') on a Sunday because the 'relieving officer' observed the sabbath. Ridicules those who believe it to be 'wicked to heal on the Sabbath Day' and hopes that the 'large London Union' to which the relieving officer belongs never need a 'drop of wine' on a Sunday.



Punch,  47 (1864), 235.

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The Song of the Drains

Anon

Genre:

Song

Subjects:

Pollution, Public Health, Politics, Engineering


    Begins by contemplating the prospect of a multitude of sewers in London, and proceeds to describe the political controversy over the state of the Thames, one politician in Erith complaining that 'You have poisoned us all on the rive, / By the mess you have made with the drains'. Turns to a farmer who laments the waste in sewage and how much money he could make from it, and then describes how Lord Robert Montagu Montagu, Lord Robert (1825–1902) ODNB
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held a meeting to discuss 'what's to be done with the drains'. Notes the conflicting contributions to the meeting from 'mudlarking contractors' and 'those who wanted the drains', the people of Edinburgh who drew attention to the drainage system of their city, 'the contractors of Rugby' who want to water their land with drains owing to poor rainfall, Robert Napier Napier, Robert (1791–1876) ODNB
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and W Hope Hope, W (fl. 1864) Palmer's
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who promise to make 'A Paradise all from the drains', and 'the owners of lands and terrains' in Highgate and Hampstead who want sewage irrespective of smell. Notes that these different parties argue over 'their filthy old mains' in The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, and looking forward to the end of the debate, promises to make he who 'Cleans the Water from Sheerness to Stained', 'King of the Drains'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 235.

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Ministers of the Interior—With a Seat in the Cabinet

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Magic, Politics


    'The Davenport Brothers'—i.e. William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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.



Punch,  47 (1864), 236.

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Indignation Meeting of Quacks

Anon

Genre:

Proceedings, Spoof

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

[Trident], pseud.  [Henry R Howard] Howard, Henry R (fl. 1853) Spielmann 1895
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Quackery, Crime, Periodicals, Commerce, Sanitation


    The initial letter forms part of an illustration showing several animals (including a frog, an owl, a snake, and a bird) discussing what appear to be medicines being presented by the owl and bird. The text describes a meeting 'attended by all the advertising quacks in the kingdom', a meeting prompted by the prosecution of A F Henery Henery, A F (fl. 1864) Palmer's
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and Mr Anderson Anderson, Mr (fl. 1864) PU1/47/23/3
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. The participants have names that reflect their shady characters: for example, Mr Stoat and Mr Larogue. Mr Stoat, the chairman, rallies support for Henery and Anderson and uses 'strong language' against the court that convicted them. Mr Foumart warns that the press now threaten to 'crush them' but points out that some 'newspaper proprietors' will continue to print their advertisements for financial reasons. Mr Larogue warns that 'the so-called respectable part of the Press' will 'proceed from bad to worse' and notes that they, like the Lancet Lancet (1823–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, will 'denounce the advertisers by name' and stigmatise the papers where such advertisements appear. Dr De La Rue reminds the meeting of the uses of 'posters and handbills', while Mr Skunk thanks Parliament Houses of Parliament
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for the libel laws, which allow him to take action against assailants. Concludes with the formation of a 'Mutual Protection Society' for quacks, and finally the entrance of an 'Officer from the Board of Health Board of Health
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' who sprinkles the place with chloride of lime.



Punch,  47 (1864), 236–37.

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Mr John Thomas on the Cattle Show

John Thomas Thomas, John
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Genre:

Drollery, Letter, Poetry

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Animal Husbandry, Breeding, Animal Development, Exhibitions, Nutrition


    Written from the perspective of a rustic who describes his visit to the annual Smithfield Club Cattle Show Smithfield Club—Cattle Show
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. He notes that he and his 'guvnor' 'tested of the beasts with knowing pinches, pokes, and nudges', draws attention to the obesity of the pigs and sheep on display, and sympathises with the animals for being out of breath. Proceeds to describe the mammoth-sized 'Prize Oxes', animals with 'Hend moddles all for simmetry and eligance of Ed', and the cows, 'their coat without a seam'. The illustration (on 237) shows three large pigs in a sty, one of which is reading a work by William Banting Banting, William (1796/7–1878) ODNB
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, the writer on corpulence.



Punch,  47 (1864), 238.

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'Ape or Angel?'

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Evolution, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Religion, Supernaturalism, Politics, Religious Authority, Controversy, Universities


    Begins with an extract from Benjamin Disraeli's Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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recent speech at the University of Oxford University of Oxford
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, in which he claimed that in answer to the pressing question of whether man is an 'ape or an angel', he was 'on the side of the angels'. The poem opens by noting 'How happy the angels should be' that he has joined them, and how busy their 'mission' will be now that they have recruited one with 'brain big with schemes' and 'tongue glib of phrase'. Thinks Disraeli will now raise a 'dagger' at the 'Broad Church' and 'Reviewers and Essayists' (a reference to Temple 1860 [Temple, Frederick et al.] 1860. Essays and Reviews, London: J. W. Parker
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) with 'Wit's edge with Hate's poison annoiting'. Lists Disraeli's range of talents, but warns that 'scarce the best mimes can from Nature escape' and that Disraeli might therefore be 'most of the Ape, / When bent on enacting the Angel'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 238.

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A Fair Challenge

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Crime, Supernaturalism, Miracle, Proof


    Reports that in a recent book, William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, reveal that they were imprisoned by 'magistrates of Oswego' as 'unlicensed jugglers'. Toasts the health of Oswego and then describes how 'angels' helped the brothers escape from their cell. Since the brothers presented this as a 'challenge to unbelievers' in their 'preternatural powers', Punch suggests that a 'crucial test' of their powers would be to 'commit them to prison' and see whether 'an angel delivers them five minutes before the time that their sentence expires'.



Punch,  47 (1864), [239].

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Dressing for an Oxford Bal Masque

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Evolution, Human Development, Supernaturalism, Religion, Natural Theology, Politics, Universities


    Shows Benjamin Disraeli Disraeli, Benjamin, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (1804–81) ODNB
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, clad in large angel wings, a star-spangled robe, and floral headdress, admiring himself in a full-length mirror. The caption quotes from Disraeli's recent address to the University of Oxford University of Oxford
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: 'The question is, is man an ape or an angel? (A Laugh) Now, I am on the side of the angels. (Cheers)'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 241.

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The Wonders of Modern Travel  [2/3]Anon, 'The Wonders of Modern Travel', Punch, 47 (1864), 217
Anon, 'The Wonders of Modern Travel', Punch, 47 (1864), 264

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Anon

Genre:

Serial, Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Travel, Accidents, Engineering, Psychology


    This article contains a long list of anxieties suffered by a railway traveller, each of which begins with the word 'Wonder'. Divided into anxieties about the 'Journey', the 'First Station', the 'Refreshment-Room', the 'Platform', and the 'Carriage', these include such worries as 'Wonder what makes the carriage wiggle-waggle about so', 'Wonder if we're going off the line', 'Wonder if any one understands what the guard says', 'Wonder if that is our bell', 'Wonder which is my carriage', 'Wonder, being safely in my seat, that there are no more accidents from people crossing the rails in a large station', and 'Wonder if the engine has broken down'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 241.

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An Anti-Gas League

Punch Punch
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Commerce, Industry, Imposture, Light, Heat, Invention


    Addressed to 'Englishmen, and Englishwomen', the writer asks his audience to recall how they have been cheated by tradesmen with a range of adulterated goods, and then asks them to 'be unto gas as it was unto sugar and butter, and again we shall triumph'. Calls on them to resort to such temporary alternatives to gas lighting as 'the sanatory Photogenic Generator', in the attempt to 'defeat the extortionate vendors of bad gas', which causes such problems as poisoning the air. Anticipates the use of 'Magnesium, the loveliest light in the world', although 'as yet this is too dear'. Puffing himself as spearheading the fight, he illustrates his earnestness by boasting that he recently 'blew up a gas collector'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 242.

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Advice to Medical Men

Anon

Genre:

Instructions, Drollery

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Narcotics


Punch,  47 (1864), 242.

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The Brothers Moses

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Imposture, Periodicals, Scientific Practitioners, Methodology, Controversy


    Discusses two items in the Morning Post Morning Post and Daily Advertising Pamphlet (1772–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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, the first being an advertisement for 'farewell Séances' for William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, the second being a letter from William Howitt Howitt, William (1792–1879) ODNB
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castigating 'the Press' for its hostility and apparently blinkered attitude towards the Davenport brothers, and observing the continuing spread of spiritualism. Punch reminds Howitt that his friends, the Davenports, 'refuse to do what you say they should do' and give 'opponents of Spiritualism' enough rope to bind them. Punch laments the fact that the Davenports' 'showman', Mr Palmer Palmer, Mr (fl. 1864) PU1/47/24/12
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, abuses the 'man of science' who tries to make 'decisive tests', and ridicules Howitt's comparison of the Davenports to ancient prophets. Proceeds to attack Howitt, accusing him of having 'many bright faculties' but lacking that of 'the discernment of quacks'. Presenting an additional extract from the advertisement of the Davenports' séances, Punch explains that 'Public writers are only vexed to see an eminent brother-chip [Howitt] incapable of seeing through the transparent gammon of a regular and common puff'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 244.

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The Right Man in the Right Place

Anon

Genre:

Reportage, Spoof

Subjects:

Nutrition, Animal Husbandry, Human Development


    Announces that William Banting Banting, William (1796/7–1878) ODNB
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is to deliver a lecture on the 'art' and 'evils' of 'getting fat' at the Smithfield Club Cattle Show Smithfield Club—Cattle Show
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, and expects his remarks to be aimed at obese pigs and humans.



Punch,  47 (1864), 244.

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Something of Billy's for Certain Sillies

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Light, Religion, Charlatanry


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1223 (17 December 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 246.

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To a Firm too Fond of 'The Streets of London'

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Steamships, Military Technology


Punch,  47 (1864), 246.

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Lines by a Ty-Coon

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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Punch,  47 (1864), 246.

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Question for Mr Buckland Buckland, Francis Trevelyan (1826–80) ODNB
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Anon

Genre:

Catechism, Drollery

Subjects:

Zoological Gardens, Zoology


    Identifies the 'visitors to the Phocae at the Zoological Gardens Zoological Society of London —Gardens
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' as the 'Perpetual Succession and a Common Seal'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 247.

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The Present Spiritualistic Excitement

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Disease, Mental Illness


    'The Tie-fuss fever'—a reference to the sensational William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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who displayed powers of mediumship whilst tied to chairs in a wooden box.



Punch,  47 (1864), 247.

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Question in Ancient Zoology

Anon

Genre:

Exam Paper, Spoof

Subjects:

Zoology, Palaeontology, Comparative Philology


    Identifies 'the biggest Don that ever lived' as the 'Masto-don'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 248.

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The Quack in the Pillory

Anon

Genre:

Discourse, Spoof

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment, Imposture, Crime, Pharmaceuticals


    Evidently inspired by the recent trial of the quacks A F Henery Henery, A F (fl. 1864) Palmer's
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and Mr Anderson Anderson, Mr (fl. 1864) PU1/47/23/3
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, this article is written from the perspective of a quack doctor confined in a pillory and being pelted with, amongst other things, his own medicine. He begins by describing the pain caused by the pillory and the 'nasty things' being thrown at him. He then wishes he had gained 'all the fees I could by legal means', and agrees that he deserves to be punished for threatening 'violation of confidence [of his customer] in black and white' and thereby furnishing 'evidence of extortion against myself'. However, he castigates the 'howling rabble' who throw his 'own filth' at him, and insists that 'Considering how many fools there are amongst you, I cannot help feeling that, standing here all filth as I am, I constitute the very best advertisement of myself that could possibly be exhibited'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 248.

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Physical Phenomenon

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Physiology, Light, Health


    Reports that an 'Eminent Oculist' has revealed that 'an intimate friend' 'finds great relief' in 'allowing [his eyes] to rest' on a 'green covered sofa'.



Punch,  47 (1864), [249].

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A Quack in the Right Place; or, What we Should Like to See

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

J T Tenniel, Sir John (1820–1914) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Treatment, Imposture, Pharmaceuticals


    Following Anon, 'Physical Phenomenon', Punch, 47 (1864), 248, shows a balding quack doctor confined to a pillory on a stage, whilst being pelted with bottles of potion, pills, and other examples of his own medicine.



Punch,  47 (1864), 253.

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Situations Wanted

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof; Drama, Drollery

Subjects:

Amusement, Telegraphy, Zoology


    Advertises 'Situations of Thrilling and Sensational Interest' to 'Dramatic Authors' capable of writing 'Novelties, with as much Reality as possible'. Provides a specimen scene set on the ocean floor and featuring numerous fish and the submarine telegraph.



Punch,  47 (1864), 254.

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How to Squash the Quacks

A Crusher Crusher, A
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Genre:

Letter, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Crime, Commerce, Periodicals


    The author outlines three ways in which he thinks quack doctors can be 'crushed'. He suggests that the General Medical Council General Medical Council
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should 'proceed' against unqualified persons giving 'medical advice', that the 'Law Courts' be able to 'nonsuit' those 'unqualified' practitioners who demand a fee, and that the press should be allowed to reject 'quack advertisements' and to expose quackery. Reveals that he refuses to buy papers featuring 'vile quack advertisements' and castigates those papers that do. Concludes by praising 'Dr Punch' for his 'philanthropic efforts to annihilate these vermin' and in a postscript argues that quacks should be removed in a police van.



Punch,  47 (1864), 254.

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Interesting Departure

Anon

Genre:

Poetry, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Observation, Gas Chemistry, Physiology


    Inspired by a report of the 'unusual absence of ozone', this poem begins by pondering the location of 'our usual ozone' and the reasons for its departure. Asking where 'our usual ozone' dwelt, answers ''Twas somewhere in the atmosphere, but where I cannot tell / You must ask PROFESSOR AIREY Airy, Sir George Biddell (1801–92) DSB ODNB
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, or some other learned swell'. Concludes by wondering whether ozone is 'in the sky' and whether we can exist without it.



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Issue 1224 (24 December 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 255.

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Song of the Advertising Quack

Anon

Genre:

Song, Drollery

Subjects:

Quackery, Commerce, Medical Practitioners, Medical Treatment, Pharmaceuticals, Crime


    Begins by boasting of his position as a quack, an 'infamous trade' that allows him and his fellow tradesmen to make a 'large income' by the 'vilest of plunder' and extortion from dupes. The chorus toasts 'success to the trade, / By which dirty hands are made' and identifies the singer as the chief of the 'filthy scoundrels'. The last verse describes quacks' dubious credentials, including the 'sham' diploma and lack of 'medical skill' or knowledge of 'drugs', and notes that the author thrives by lying to his frightened patients about their diseases, and by 'advertisements daily'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 256.

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Letter from Mr Whalley

G H Whalley Whalley, G H
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Invention, Religion


    This letter is apparently from the staunchly protestant statesman, George H Whalley Whalley, George Hammond (1813–78) ODNB
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, who warns readers of a new invention, a 'Rafrânchisseur'. Believes that this glass apparatus for allowing a lady to 'blow perfume [...] over the face of any friend' is 'a Popish device, intended to familiarise people with sprinkling'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 256.

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The Greatest Wonder of Spiritualism

Anon

Genre:

Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry


    Notes from 'a book published on behalf of' William H H Davenport Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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and Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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, that the 'jugglers' are 'declared' to have been 'transported through the air', but wonders why, since arriving in Britain, they have neither been transported nor 'taken up'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 257.

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Forensic Medicine and Political Pathology

Anon

Genre:

Essay, Drollery

Subjects:

Disease, Medical Treatment, Politics, Language


    Noting how 'Titles and truth separated many years ago by mutual consent', how 'Mottoes make no pretensions to veracity', and how 'many sciences [...] have long enjoyed' the 'privilege' of 'concealing in curious phraseology their cherished mysteries', the author presents extracts from 'two popular manuals' which describe various aspects of financial and political life as if they were medical symptoms. 'Rickets in Bankruptcy', for example, causes many 'stunted objects of legislative negligence' to crowd London's 'Superior Courts', whose 'natural flaccidity' can be 'aggravated' by being 'injudiciously puffed'. 'Cacoëthes loquendi—Maxillary Convulsions' refers to the 'irrespressible desire' of 'the youngest members of the legislative family' to 'get on his legs' and then to throw off a 'large amount of declamation'. The account warns that if 'long confined to the House of Commons House of Commons
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' the patient may 'sink into a state of chronic boredom'. 'Tories' Nostalgia—Home-Office Sickness' refers to the Tory opposition's 'long involuntary absence' from government, and includes the tendency of 'The melancholy Member, separated from patronage and all he holds most dear', to 'sit for hours on a bench, gazing at a vacancy'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 258.

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The Aristocracy Manufacturing their Wares for an Industrial Exhibition

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
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Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Industry, Class, Amusement


    This illustration shows several aristocrats constructing objects in a large lounge on whose walls hang several large paintings. The captions explain who is making which object: for example, 'The Duke is knitting a stocking' and The Duke's sister-in-law has been building a model ironclad'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 262.

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The Awful Apparition

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Light, Magic


    Shows a man in a room, lit only by a large oil lamp on a shelf. The lamp illuminates two hats hanging on an adjacent wall, making the combined image of the lamp and hats resemble a face. The caption reveals that the man, Mr Skeary, has just returned from a 'spiritual seance', and the latter image 'has such an effect on his nerves that he could not go to business the next day'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 263.

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Meteorological Appointment

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Meteorology, Government


    Observes that no-one 'ever supposed' that the 'Clerk of the Weather Office' (i.e. the office of the imaginary functionary supposed to control the weather) was a real government office, 'notwithstanding the existence of ADMIRAL FITZROY'S Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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department' (i.e. the Meteorological Office Meteorological Office
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). Noting that Fitzroy is 'not generally imagined to have any control over the weather', observes from an announcement in the Edinburgh Courant Edinburgh Evening Courant (1715–89) Daily Courant (1760–59) Edinburgh Evening Courant (1860–71) Edinburgh Courant (1871–86) BUCOP
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, that the engineer of the 'Lighthouse Steamer' Pharos Pharos, ship
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, has become the 'Superintendent of Northern Lights' and wonders whether this refers to the 'Aurora Borealis'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 263.

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To Cambridge Students

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Universities, Education, Spiritualism

People mentioned:

William H H Davenport, Davenport, William Henry Harrison (1841–77) WBI
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Ira E Davenport Davenport, Ira Erastus (1839–1911) WBI
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Punch,  47 (1864), 264.

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The Wonders of Modern Travel  [3/3]Anon, 'The Wonders of Modern Travel', Punch, 47 (1864), 217
Anon, 'The Wonders of Modern Travel', Punch, 47 (1864), 241

Close

Anon

Genre:

Serial, Notes, Drollery

Subjects:

Railways, Travel


^^ Back to the top of this issue

Issue 1225 (31 December 1864)Expand    Contract

Punch,  47 (1864), 265.

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No More Bursting of Water-Pipes

A Plumber and Glazier Plumber and Glazier, A
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Genre:

Letter, Spoof

Subjects:

Meteorology

People mentioned:

Robert Fitzroy Fitzroy, Robert (1805–65) DSB
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Publications cited:

The Times The Times (1777–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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Punch,  47 (1864), 265.

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No Cure and High Pay

Anon

Genre:

Notes

Subjects:

Quackery, Charlatanry, Medical Treatment


Punch,  47 (1864), 265.

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Cannibalism in the Land of Cakes

Anon

Genre:

News-Commentary, Drollery

Subjects:

Anthropology, Human Development, Animal Behaviour, Race, Proof


    Discusses remarks made by 'a native of Caithness', M Clay Clay, M (fl. 1864) PU1/47/27/3
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, at a meeting of the Anthropological Society Anthropological Society of London
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. Clay focused on evidence of a child's jawbone among shells and bones, found in Scotland, but denies that this constitutes proof that his ancestors were cannibals. Punch agrees that 'An isolated fact is no proof', but suggests that if it did 'prove cannibalism' then it 'would establish nothing more than the existence of a pre-historic Sawney Bean Beane, Sawney (fl. 15th–16th century ) ODNB
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'—a late thirteenth- and early fourteenth-century Scottish cannibal.



Punch,  47 (1864), 265.

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The Great Rope-Tying Mystery

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Magic, Charlatanry


Punch,  47 (1864), 266.

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No More Quack Medicine

Anon

Genre:

Announcement, Spoof

Subjects:

Medical Treatment, Quackery, Periodicals


    Puffs Punch's Almanack Punch's Almanack (1842–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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as the cure of a range of medical complaints. The almanac has displaced 'quack brain pills, or other useless medicines' and 'given relief to Thousands upon Thousands of poor sufferers'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 267.

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Spirits! Spirits! Spirits!

Anon

Genre:

Advertisement, Spoof

Subjects:

Spiritualism, Charlatanry, Periodicals


    Puffs Punch's Almanack Punch's Almanack (1842–1900+) Waterloo Directory
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as the 'best Medium in the world for introducing Spirits into stupid social séances', a publication that will put everybody 'under the influence of good Spirits'.



Punch,  47 (1864), 268.

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Education for the Middle Classes

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
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Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Illustrators:

D M Du Maurier, George Louis Palmella Busson (1834–96) ODNB
Close   View the register entry >>
Spielmann, Marion Harry Alexander 1895. The History of "Punch", London: Cassell
Close   View the register entry >>

Subjects:

Education, Class, Physics, Pneumatics, Gender


    Shows a young girl, Lucy, studying at a table and an older man (her father) looking on. The man asks his daughter what 'Miss Trimmer has set you to do to-morrow' and Lucy replies that 'It's on pneumatics in relation to—but you really wouldn't understand it, if I told you'.



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Punch,  47 (1864), 271–72.

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Index

Anon

Genre:

Illustration, Drollery

Relevant illustrations:

wdct.

Subjects:

Quackery, Imposture, Periodicals


    Shows Mr Punch using a giant volume of Punch, volume 47, to strike the heads of several quack medicine vendors, whose pills, ointments and balms are shown (272).






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