Programme

#dhcshef

Thursday (8th September 2016)
09:30 - 11:30
Registration
11:30 - 13:00
Introductions and Plenary 1

Culture, memory and democracy: Digital opportunities in the Global South

  • Marilyn Deegan

King’s College London

13:00 - 14:00
Lunch
14:00 - 15:30
Session 1 — Big Data, Bibliography, and the Early Modern Printed Book Session 2 Session 3

From Paper to Digital: Designing the Universal Short Title Catalogue

  • Graeme Kemp

University of St Andrews

Art History ‘behind the scenes’: understanding the production of knowledge in the digital age

  • Christina Kampiosiori,
  • Claire Warwick,
  • Simon Mahony

UCL

Windows on Waverley: exploring the effect of variations in the construction of literary social networks (20 min paper)

  • Karen Wade

UCD Humanities Institute, Dublin

New Digital Initiatives: Preserving the World’s Rarest Books

  • Shanti Graheli

University of St Andrews

We're Not Gonna Take It: Putting the Web at Musician's Service

  • Albert Meroño-Peñuela,
  • Rinke Hoekstra

VU University Amsterdam

Intertextuality and the Semantic Web: Jane Eyre as a test case for modelling literary relationships with Linked Data

  • Bill Hughes,
  • Sarah Bartlett

University of Sheffield

Developing New Bibliographic Tools for the Digital Age: Distribution of German Books by Sheets in the Early Modern Print World

  • Drew Thomas

University of St Andrews

Film Reception 2.0: Methods for Analysing Audience Responses in Digital Environments

  • Jennifer O'Meara

Maynooth University

15:30 - 16:00
Tea Break
16:00 - 17:30
The Academic Book of the Future

The Academic Book of the Future

  • Marilyn Deegan

King’s College London

18:00
Drinks Reception
Friday (9th September 2016)
09:30 - 11:00
Session 4 — Text Analytics 1: Between numbers and words Session 5 Session 6

How not to read texts: giving context to big data

  • Iona Hine

University of Sheffield

Industrial Memories: Data Analytics as a form of Witnessing

  • Emilie Pine,
  • Mark Keane,
  • Susan Leavy

University College Dublin

Using Primary Sources: creating and using e-textbooks in partnership with University libraries and publishers

  • Jonathan Hogg

University of Liverpool

Quantitative analysis and textual interpretation in Caxton

  • Rosie Shute

University of Sheffield

Industrial Memories: Methodologies for analysing the Data of the Commission to Inquire into Child Abuse Report (Ryan Report)

  • Emilie Pine,
  • Mark Keane,
  • Susan Leavy

University College Dublin

Classifying Echoes: Using network modularity to study historical text reuse

  • Sinai Rusinek

University of Tel Aviv

Comparing like with like? Tools for exploring families of corpora

  • Harri Siirtola,
  • Terttu Nevalainen,
  • Tanja Säily

Worldbuilder: a tool for Text-World annotation and visualization

  • Yufang Ho,
  • Dan McIntyre,
  • Jane Lugea,
  • Jing Wang,
  • Zhijie Xu

University of Huddersfield

11:00 - 11:30
Tea Break
11:30 - 13:00
Session 7 — Text Analytics 2: Identifying complex meanings in historical texts Session 8 Session 9

Distributional semantics as a tool for the humanities: Compatible frameworks or unbridgeable gaps?

  • Seth Mehl

University of Sheffield

Reflections on the development and implementation of an introductory MOOC for DH methodologies.

  • Simon Mahony,
  • Tessa Hauswedell,
  • Ulrich Tiedau

UCL

On building a critical digital archive: The Hogarth Press and The Modernist Archives Publishing Project (MAPP)

  • Nicola Wilson

University of Reading

The Utility of Count-based Models for the Digital Humanities

  • Gabriel Recchia

University of Cambridge

Collaborative Digital Humanities training: the CHASE Arts and Humanities in the Digital Age (AHDA) programme

  • Paul Gooding,
  • Francesca Benatti,
  • Matthew Sillence

Open University

Electrifying Intoxicants: Building a Database of Alcohol, Nicotine, Caffeine, and Opium in Early Modern England

  • James Brown

University of Sheffield

Developing an interface for historical sociolinguistics

  • Eetu Mäkelä,
  • Tanja Säily,
  • Terttu Nevalainen
13:00 - 14:00
Lunch
14:00 - 15:30
Session 10 — Adding Value: Challenging Practical and Philosophical Assumptions in the Digitisation of Historical Sources Session 11 Session 12

Re-Curating and Re-Imagining the Digitised Archive in the Classroom

  • Adam Crymble

University of Hertfordshire

Crime and punishment in three dimensions, 1780-1900.

  • Zoe Alker,
  • Tim Hitchcock

University of Liverpool

A Question of Style: individual voices and corporate identity in the Edinburgh Review, 1814-1820

  • Francesca Benatti,
  • David King

Open University

Historical TEI: Developing a Portfolio of Common Practice

  • Melodee Beals

Loughborough University

Digital visualization of transnationalism: a case study of Hong Kong migrants in Canada during the handover of Hong Kong period

  • Sheng Zhang

Distorted Projections: Spatial Imaginaries and Desired Trajectories in Christina Stead’s For Love Alone

  • Anouk Lang

University of Edinburgh

London Lives Petitions Project: Remixing and Remaking Digital Histories

  • Sharon Howard

University of Sheffield

Human Rights 3D: A Social Justice Platform for Historical Recovery, Reconstruction & Reconciliation in Digital Humanities

  • Angel Nieves

Hamilton College, Clinton, New York, USA

Chinese Text Project: A Digital Library of Pre-Modern Chinese Literature

  • Donald Sturgeon

Harvard University

15:30 - 16:00
Tea Break
16:00 - 17:30
Plenary 2

Spiralling: teaching undergraduate digital literary studies

  • Stephen H. Gregg

Bath Spa University

19:00
Conference Dinner
Saturday (10th September 2016)
09:30 - 11:00
Session 13 Session 14 — Transforming Musicology Session 15

Text-mining, geo-coding and mapping historic smells

  • Deborah Leem,
  • Daniele Quericia

Cambridge University

Early Music & Digital Technology

  • Tim Crawford,
  • David Lewis

Goldsmiths

“Transcribed by hand. Owned by libraries. Made for everyone” – Whatever happened to EEBO-TCP?

  • Michael Popham

University of Oxford

Visualising Convict Lives

  • Bob Shoemaker,
  • Richard Ward

University of Sheffield

Hearing Opera: Wagner and the human response

  • Daniel Müllensiefen,
  • Richard Lewis,
  • Harri Siirtola,
  • David Baker,
  • Christophe Rhodes

Goldsmiths

Minimal Editions in Practice: The Digital Anthology of Early English Drama

  • Daniel Powell

King’s College London

Reading Along Geographical Lines: Using GIS to Interrogate the Digital Scholarly Edition

  • Caleb Derven

Maynooth University

Semantic Linking and the Workflows of Musicology

  • Kevin Page,
  • Terhi Nermikko-Fuller,
  • Carolin Rindfleisch,
  • David Weigl

University of Oxford

Invisible Interpretations: Quantitative Text Analysis and Intellectual History

  • Mark Hill

London School of Economics

Networks of Musicology

  • Ben Fields,
  • David Lewis

Goldsmiths

Publishing Musicology Digitally

  • Richard Lewis

Goldsmiths

11:00 - 11:30
Tea Break
11:30 - 13:00
Session 16 Session 17 No Session

Active Archives: Building a new archival platform for the discovery of hidden narratives

  • Evan Higgins,
  • Josh Cowls

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Innovation and the Digital Humanities: Early lessons from the King’s Digital Laboratory

  • Simon Tanner,
  • James Smithies

King’s College London

Lost in the Flood: finding and using digital cultural heritage for research

  • Agiatis Benardou,
  • Lorna Hughes

Digital Curation Unit

Reflections on running a collaborative digital humanities center: a libraries-academic partnership to advance DH teaching, research and community building

  • Brian Rosenblum

University of Kansas

“Do you remember the first time?”: Case Studies on digital content reuse in the context of Europeana Cloud

  • Eliza Papaki,
  • Agiatis Benardou,
  • Vicky Garnett

Digital Curation Unit

13:00 - 14:00
Lunch
14:00 - 15:30
Plenary 3

Clouds

  • Matthew Gold

The City University of New York

15:30
Close