SESSION DETAILS

Session 610

Title:            Social Networks of Clergy in Late Antiquity, II
Abstract:         Late antique clerics did not act in a social void.
                  They had friends, partners, allies, patrons, and
                  enemies. These two sessions will examine relations
                  which linked bishops, presbyters, and deacons with
                  lay people, women, heretics, monks, and other members
                  of the clergy, in different regions of Christendom in
                  c. 300-600. While analysing normative texts,
                  narratives, theological treatises, inscriptions, and
                  particularly letters the speakers will seek to
                  explain the range, strength, and character of
                  personal and institutional contacts as well as the
                  mechanisms which helped to establish, maintain, and
                  sometimes break them up.
Sponsor:          Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet Warszawski
Organiser         Robert Wiśniewski, Department of Ancient History,
                  Uniwersytet Warszawski
Moderator/Chair   David Hunter, Department of Modern & Classical
                  Languages, Literatures & Cultures, University of
                  Kentucky

Paper -a          Friends and Enemies: The Female Relationships of Late
                  Antique Clerics in Exile (Language: English)
Speaker:          Julia Hillner, Department of History, University of
                  Sheffield

Indexing Terms:   Byzantine Studies, Ecclesiastical History, Social
                  History, Women’s Studies
Equipment:        Data Projector (“beamer”- requires laptop)

Paper -b          Eating with Heretics: Nicene Clergy toward Homoian
                  Communities in the Successor Kingdoms (Language:
                  English)
Speaker:          Marta Szada, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet
                  Warszawski
Indexing Terms:   Daily Life, Ecclesiastical History, Mentalities,
                  Social History
Equipment:        Data Projector (“beamer”- requires laptop)

Paper -c          Managing Expectations in a Western Ascetic Network:
                  Augustine, Paulinus of Nola, Sulpicius Severus
                  (Language: English)
Speaker:          Michael Williams, Department of Ancient Classics,
                  Maynooth University
Indexing Terms:   Ecclesiastical History, Monasticism, Social History
Equipment:        Data Projector (“beamer”- requires laptop)

Paper -d          Open Courtesy and Hidden Rivalry in Salutatory
                  Formulas of Clerics’ Letters in Late Antiquity
                  (Language: English)
Speaker:          Stanisław Adamiak, Instytut Historyczny, Uniwersytet
                  Warszawski
Indexing Terms:   Ecclesiastical History, Language and Literature –
                  Latin, Social History
Equipment:        None

Session Time:     Tue. 05 July – 11.15-12.45

Session 1311

Title:            Forming Christian Authority in Late Antiquity, II:
                  Heresiology, Hagiography, and Church Politics
Abstract:         Late Antiquity saw many controversial ecclesiastical
                  disputes, which both threatened the legitimacy of
                  individual bishops, clerics and monks, and gave them
                  the chance to claim privileged status as interpreters
                  of correct doctrine. A vast corpus of apologetic
                  Christian literature documents these contests for
                  authority within the church. This session considers
                  various textual strategies adopted by late-antique
                  ecclesiastical controversialists to try to come out
                  on top in church politics. Individual papers consider
                  Augustine’s use of heresiology, Pope Gelasius’
                  development of a polemical definition of communion,
                  and Cyril of Scythopolis’ Chalcedonian appropriation
                  of the career of the revered Palestinian abbot
                  Euthymius.
Sponsor:          Oxford Medieval Studies Programme
Organiser         Robin Whelan, Brasenose College / The Oxford Research
                  Centre in the Humanities (TORCH), University of
                  Oxford
Moderator/Chair   Julia Hillner, Department of History, University of
                  Sheffield

Paper -a          Heresiology as Church Politics (Language: English)
Speaker:          Richard Flower, Department of Classics & Ancient
                  History, University of Exeter
Indexing Terms:   Ecclesiastical History, Religious Life, Rhetoric,
                  Theology
Equipment:        Data Projector (“beamer”- requires laptop), Laptop

Paper -b          Heresy and _communio_ in the Letters and _tractates_
                  of Gelasius I (Language: English)
Speaker:          Samuel Cohen, Department of History, Sonoma State
                  University
Indexing Terms:   Ecclesiastical History, Religious Life, Rhetoric,
                  Theology
Equipment:        None

Paper -c          Creating a Chalcedonian Saint: The Career of
                  Euthymius the Great (Language: English)
Speaker:          Daniel Neary, Corpus Christi College, University of
                  Cambridge
Indexing Terms:   Ecclesiastical History, Hagiography, Monasticism,
                  Theology
Equipment:        Data Projector (“beamer”- requires laptop), Laptop

Session Time:     Wed. 06 July – 16.30-18.00

Session 1437

Title:            Network Science and Medieval Sources: A Round Table
                  Discussion
Abstract:         Building on the success of our session on network
                  analysis and medieval sources at Leeds IMC 2015, this
                  round table will discuss the potential applications
                  of network science to various types of evidence from
                  the Middle Ages, and consider the issues and
                  questions that may arise in such ground-breaking
                  interdisciplinary research. The participants are all
                  exploring new approaches and methodologies in their
                  research and represent a broad range of expertise
                  (Maths/Physics; Late Antiquity; the Viking Age; and
                  Anglo-Saxon England) allowing for a wide-ranging and
                  lively discussion.

                  Participants include Julia Hillner (University of
                  Sheffield), Judith Jesch (University of Nottingham),
                  Ralph Kenna (Coventry University), Helen Lawson
                  (University of Edinburgh), Pádraig Mac Carron
                  (University of Oxford), and Francesca Tinti
                  (Universidad del País Vasco).
Sponsor:          Applied Mathematics Research Centre (AMRC), Coventry
                  University
Organiser         Máirín Mac Carron, Department of History, University
                  of Sheffield
Moderator/Chair   Máirín Mac Carron
Participant       Julia Hillner, Department of History, University of
                  Sheffield, Judith Jesch, Centre for the Study of the
                  Viking Age, University of Nottingham, Ralph Kenna,
                  Applied Mathematics Research Centre (AMRC), Coventry
                  University, Helen Lawson, School of History, Classics
                  & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh, Pádraig Mac
                  Carron, Department of Experimental Psychology,
                  University of Oxford and Francesca Tinti,
                  Departamento de Historia Medieval, Moderna y de
                  América, Universidad del País Vasco
Purpose:          Building on the success of our session on network
                  analysis and medieval sources at Leeds IMC 2015, this
                  round table will discuss the potential applications
                  of network science to various types of evidence from
                  the Middle Ages, and consider the issues and
                  questions that may arise in such ground-breaking
                  interdisciplinary research. The participants are all
                  exploring new approaches and methodologies in their
                  research and represent a broad range of expertise
                  (Maths/Physics; Late Antiquity; the Viking Age; and
                  Anglo-Saxon England) allowing for a wide-ranging and
                  lively discussion.

                  Participants include Julia Hillner (University of
                  Sheffield), Judith Jesch (University of Nottingham),
                  Ralph Kenna (Coventry University), Helen Lawson
                  (University of Edinburgh), Pádraig Mac Carron
                  (University of Oxford), and Francesca Tinti
                  (Universidad del País Vasco).
Equipment:        None

Session Time:     Wed. 06 July – 19.00-20.00

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