[Monuments.] Faringdon Ward within. [Christ's Church.]138

[Monuments.] Faringdon Ward within. [Christ's Church.]

All those that knew her,     
lov'd her, for her Life,
Chaste, Pure and Pious,     
was of all approv'd;
(a rich Possession's     
such a Vertuous Wife;)
All Ill she hated,     
and all Good she lov'd;
Be this his Comfort then,     
bewails her most,
In Heaven she's found.     
that here on Earth is lost.

In a Table in the Quire, hanging upon the Organt, it is written.

Memoriæ Sacrum.
Neer this, lyeth the Body of Joane, Daughter and sole Heire of Edmund Biggs, Gent. and late Wife to Clement Goldsmith, of Gray's Inn, Esquire. Who was in this Church baptized, the 3d of March, 1564. and interred the 17th of February, 1631.

Close by this small Remembrance,     
you may find
That which apparel'd erst,     
an honest Mind;
A Body there inurn'd,     
where once did rest
A charitable Soul,     
that was its Guest.
But see what Sickness, Age,     
and Death have done;
These have they parted:     
Yet the Day shall come,
When they shall meet,     
and re-unite again,
And be assum'd     
above the Heavens to reign:
Until which Time,     
may thy poor Monument
To Readers shew,     
a sad Sons true Intent.
But if this perish,     
yet her Virtue shall
(She Dead) preserve     
her blest Memorial.

These two Stones lie close togethe, and close to the Communion Table.

In which Place, lieth buried the Body of that Learned and Worthy Divine, Dr. Sampson Price.

Fui CLAPHAMUS, Pater istius Johannis nuper defuncti, & hic sepulti. Qui obiit septimo die Februarii, Anno Dom. 1621.

Here lyeth buried the Body of JOHN CLAPHAM, Esquire, one of the Six Clerks of the Chancery. Who dyed the 6th Day of December, Anno 1618. his Father, Luke Clapham, then living.]

In this Parish of Chirst's Church, was a Messuage and Tenement of Robert Egleston, formerly given for the Maintenance of a Priest, to say Mass in Hackney Church. This Tenement, together with all the Shops, Cellars, Solers, Gardens, Commodities, and Implements belonging to it, was given to Thomas Perse and Richard Mody, 2 Edw. VI.

A Tenement in Christ's Church, to maintain a Mass in Hackney.

J. S.


Late MONUMENTS.

 

Since the new building of this Church, there have been Monuments and Stones, with Inscriptions for these Persons. Viz.

Late Monuments.

In the Chancel. For Nicolas Richardson, late of the Island of Jamaica, 1702.

Captain Valentine Pyne, born in Devon, spent most of his Life in India: Highly respected by the King of Bantam, and beloved for his Integrity; died 1691.

Thomas Hollier, Citizen and Chirurgeon of London; Chirurgeon to St. Thomas's Hospital in Southwark, 53 Years, deceased 1690. And Lucy his Wife, 1677. And Thomas their eldest Son, 1672. And James, their second Son, 1686.

Richard Royston, Esq; Citizen of London, and Bookseller to Three Kings; died 1686. in the 86th Year of his Age. And Elizabeth, Wife of Luke Meredith, Grand-daughter to the above Richard, 1689. And Mary Chiswel, late Wife of Richard Chiswel, Bookseller, another Daughter of the above Richard Royston, 1698.

Hatchment of Sir Peter Floyer, Alderman, and sometime Sheriff of this City, lying in a Vault hereabouts.

Martha, late Wife of Nathaniel Sutch, 1688. and their Daughter Mary.

Against the East Wall, North of the Communion Table, a Monument for One buried in the Church-yard; viz. Mary, late Wife of Nehemiah Grew, M.D. 1685.

Edmund Sheringham, sometime Incumbent of this Parish, died 1690.

In the Body of the Church, Flat Stones for, John Grice, 1680. Richard Morton, M.D. 1698. Mary Brown, 1699.

In the Cloisters. Nathaniel Hawes, Esquire, Treasurer of Christ's Hospital, died 1700. Aged

Johana Parey, 1683. Aged 108.

Adam Wood, 1681. Son of Robert and Katharine Wood.

Two Sons and four Daughters of Jarvis and Mary Plumb; as also Anne their eldest Daughter, 1703.

Add to the rest , the Monmument of Mr. Firming, in his time, a Man most remarkable for Charity, and a great Friend to this Hospital, against the South Wall of the Cloisters, with this Inscription.

To the Memory.
Of Mr. Thomas Firmin, late Citizen of London, and one of the Governors of this and St. Thomas's Hospital. He was to the Orphans of this a most tender Father; and for the Sick and Wounded of the other, a careful Provider. He constantly expended the greatest Profits of his Trade, Portions of his Time, and Labour of his Thoughts, in Works of Charity: In providing Work for Thousands of poor People; in Visiting and Relieving necessitous Families, and in Redeeming Debtors out of Prison. [He also gave away, among vast Numbers of Poor, pious Books, writ by Divines of the Church of England.] He took indefatigable Pains in succouring the distressed Refugees of France and Ireland. He was a most eminent Example of improving all Opportunites of doing Good, of successfully provoking others to good Works, and of an unfeigned Charity, both as to Places and Parties. He was very faithful and wise in disposing of publick and private Charities, and zealous for promoting of a Reformation of Manners. Yet after all he ascribed nothing to himself, acknowledging on his Death-bed, that he had been an unprofitable Servant. And he professed, that he hoped for Salvation only from the Mercy of God, through the Mediation of Jesus Christ.
He departed this Life December the 20th, 1697. in the 66th Year of his Age.

This Mounment was erected by his sorrowful Widow.

He that soweth bountifully, shall reap bouuntifully. 2 Cor. ix. 6.

This