[Serjeants Inn.] Faringdon Ward without. [The new Temple.]270

[Serjeants Inn.] Faringdon Ward without. [The new Temple.]

"shall continue any longer than seven Years. And my Will and Desire is, that the Children of the several Parishes and Places aforesaid, to be taken into the said Hospital, shall be from time to time preferred before any other, if capable, to go to the University, and to the Allowance before mentioned."
In Witness, &c. the 20th day of October, the 14th of Car. II. Annoq; Dom. 1662.

In pursuance of this, Richard Charm, Orphan of Humphrey Charm, was first admitted into the said Hospital, the 29th of July, 1664. from White Friers Precinct.]

Then is the Serjeants Inn, so called, for that divers Judges and Serjeants at the Law keep a Commons, and are lodged there in Term times.

Serjeants Inn in Fleetstreet.

This Serjeants Inn, seems to have been sometime a Garden belonging to the New Temple; and granted by King Henry III. to a Bishop of Chichester. For such a Patent is found; R. Chichester. Epo. nov. Templ. Gardinum in Vico ante novum Templum London.

Serjeants Inn, a Garden

J. S.

Claus. 10 Hen. 3. m. 19.

This, or some other Messuage of Serjeant Inn, was in the Crown in Edward VI. his Reign. Who in his 3d Year, sold all the said Messuage, Lordship, and Hereditament thereof, to Sir Edward Mountague, and John Champanet.]

Pet. le Neve.

Very near this White Friers, in Fleetstreet, many lewd Women harboured. And the Tumults there so disturbed the Religious, that the King was fain to direct his Letters to the Maior and Aldermen, to rout the naughty People thence. As appears by this Record.

Lewd Women near the White Friers.

J. S.

Rex Maiori & Aldermannis, &c, i.e. "The King to the Maior and Aldermen of the City of London, who now are, or shall be for the Time being, Greeting. Our Beloved in Christ, the Prior and Brethren of the Order of St. Mary of Mount Carmel, London, have besought Us, that whereas the Lord Edward, of famous Memory, heretofore, King of England, our Grandfather, had given them a certain Place in Fleetstreet, London, where now they dwell; and that Women and Whores, and other Men of bad Report, have now for some time made their Abode near the foresaid Place, and yet do abide; Whereby the said Brethren, by divers Clamours and Outcries, by the Resort of Men to those Harlots, near the foresaid Place, Night and Day made, are much hindered in their Celebration of Divine Service. And that they cannot mind other Divine Obsequies, according to the pious Desires of our Grandfather: That We will, that ye cause to be removed the said Women, Whores, and others of bad Fame, from the Houses and Places in which they so inhabit, for the Honour of Holy Church, and the Quiet and Tranquillity of them, the Prior and Brethren, serving God in the same Place. We, minding to yield to their Supplication, for the Cause aforesaid, Command, firmly enjoyning you, that you cause, without delay, to be removed from the foresaid Houses or Places, all such Women, Whores and People of bad Fame, in the West Lane, or elsewhere abiding in the Houses, adjoining to the Places of the aforesaid Prior and Brethren; as often, and whensoever, by them the Prior and Brethren, or any of them, upon this ye shall be required. Firmly forbidding, on our behalf, all and singular Affairs of the foresaid Houses and Places, being in the foresaid Lane, or elsewhere, as afore is said. That for the time to come, they do not let, or cause to be let, by any means, the Houses or Places beforesaid to such Women."

Rot. Claus. 20 Ed. 3. p. 1. m. 26. dorso.

Geo. Holmes.

Witness the King at Westminster, the 18th day of February.]

Next is the New Temple, so called, because the Templers, before the building of this House, had their Temple in Oldbourn. This House was founded by the Knights Templers in England, in the Reign of Henry II. And the same was dedicated to God and our blessed Lady, by Heraclius, Patriark of the Church, called the Holy Resurrection in Jherusalem, in the Year of Christ 1185.

New Temple.

It contained all that space of Ground from the White Friers, Eastward, unto Essex House without Temple Bar; yea, and a part of that too. As appears by the first Grant thereof to Sir Will. Paget, Kt. Secretary of State to King Henry VIII. Pat. 2. Ed. VI.]

The Extent of the New Temple.

J. S.

Origin. Juridic.

These Knights Templers took their beginning about the Year 1118. in manner following. Certain Noblemen, Horsemen, religiously bent, bound by Vow themselves in the Hands of the Patriark of Jeruslaem, to serve Christ after the manner of Regular Canons, in Chastity and Obedience; and to renounce their own proper Wills for ever. The first of which Order were Hugh Paganus, [i.e. Pain] and Geffrey de S. Audomare. And whereas at the first they had no certain Habitation, Baldwin, King of Jherusalem, granted unto them a dwelling Place in his Palace, by the Temple; and the Canons of the same Temple, gave them the Street, thereby to build therein their Houses of Office. And the Patriark, the King, the Nobles, and Prelates, gave unto them certain Revenues out of their Lordships.

Original of the Templers.

Their first Profession was for Safeguard of the Pilgrims, coming to visit the Sepulchre, and to keep the High Ways against the lying in wait of Thieves, &c. About ten Years after, they had a Rule appointed unto them, and a white Habit, by Honorius the second, then Pope. And whereas that had but Nine in number, they began to increase daily. Afterward, in Pope Eugenius's time, they bare Crosses of red Cloth on their uppermost Garments, to be known from others. And in short time, because they had their first Mansion hard by the Temple of our Lord in Jheruslaem, they were called Knights of the Temple.

Profession of the Templers.

Many Noblemen, in all parts of Christendom, became Brethren of this Order; and builded for themselves Temples in every City or great Town. In England, this was their chief House, which they builded after the Form of the Temple near to the Sepulchre of our Lord at Jherusalem. They had also other Temples in Cambridge, Bristow, Canterbury, Dover, Warwick, and divers other Places. This Temple in London, was often made a Store House of Mens Treasure; I mean, such as feared the spoil thereof in other Places.

Matthew Paris noteth, that in the Year 1232. Hubert de Burgh, Earl of Kent, being Prisoner in the Tower of London, the King was informed that he had much Treasure laid up in this New Temple, under the Custody of the Templers. Whereupon he sent for the Master of the Temple, and examined him straightly; who confessed, that Money being delivered unto him and his Brethren to be kept, he knew not how much there was of it. The King demanded to have the same delivered; but it was answered,

Mat. Paris.

Hubert Earl of Kent, his Treasure in the New Temple.

That